Clockwise (film)

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Clockwise
Clockwise poster.jpg
theatrical release poster by Tom Jung
Directed by Christopher Morahan
Produced by Michael Codron
Written by Michael Frayn
Starring John Cleese
Music by George Fenton
Cinematography John Coquillon
Edited by Peter Boyle
Production
  company
Thorn EMI Screen Entertainment
Distributed by Universal Pictures
Release date(s) March 1986
Running time 96 minutes
Country United Kingdom
Language English
Box office $1,476,356[1]

Clockwise is a 1986 British comedy film starring John Cleese, directed by Christopher Morahan, written by Michael Frayn and produced by Michael Codron. The film's music was composed by George Fenton.

For his performance Cleese won the 1987 Peter Sellers Award For Comedy at the Evening Standard British Film Awards. Most urban scenes were shot in the West Midlands and Yorkshire/Lincolnshire while rural scenes were largely shot in Shropshire.[2]

Plot[edit]

Brian Stimpson (Cleese), headmaster of Thomas Tompion Comprehensive School, has been elected to chair the annual Headmasters' Conference. Habitually disorganised as a young man, Stimpson is now fastidiously organized and punctual, and his school runs "like clockwork". He is the first headmaster of a comprehensive school to chair a Headmaster's Conference, that honour usually being reserved for heads of the more prestigious private schools.

Despite meticulous rehearsal of his speech and preparations for the journey to the conference, his ordered world unwinds as a series of misfortunes befalls him en route. His troubles begin as he inadvertently misses his train and loses the text of his speech. As he cannot find any other transportation, he commandeers the car of one of his pupils, Laura Wisely (Maiden), to make the rest of the journey. As further unfortunate events unfold, Stimpson and Wisely severely damage and ultimately lose the car. Now desperate to reach the conference on time, they resort to stealing the sports car of a passing businessman.

Stimpson finally arrives at the conference in the ripped suit of the bereft businessman and gives an improvised, nonsensical speech to the confused headmasters. Finally, he directs all of the headmasters to stand and sing the hymn To Be a Pilgrim, as he often would to his own pupils. He is then accosted by his disgruntled wife, Laura's worried parents and several other parties he had offended over the course of his journey. The film ends as he is led away by several policemen.

Cast[edit]

References[edit]

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