Colin Murray Turbayne

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Colin Murray Turbayne
Born (1916-02-07)7 February 1916
Australia
Died May 16, 2006(2006-05-16) (aged 90)
Era Contemporary philosophy
Region Western philosophy
Main interests
George Berkeley's philosophy

Colin Murray Turbayne (7 February 1916 – 16 May 2006) was an Australian philosopher, who spent most of his academic career at the University of Rochester, where he first had a position in 1957 and became professor emeritus in 1981. His doctorate was from the University of Pennsylvania. During World War II he had worked for Australian Intelligence, in the Pacific War theatre.

He was an authority on George Berkeley and was the first commentator to recognize the central importance of metaphor in the philosophy of Berkeley.[1] He is best known for his book The Myth of Metaphor, published in 1962. In this book, Professor Turbayne argued that metaphor would necessarily occur in any language that could ever claim to embody richness and depth of understanding.[2] In the early 1990s Colin M. Turbayne and his wife established an International Berkeley Essay Prize competition in cooperation with the Philosophy Department at the University of Rochester[3]

Publications[edit]

  • Turbayne, C. M. (Sep 1959). "Berkeley's Two Concepts of Mind". Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 20 (1): 85–92. doi:10.2307/2104957. JSTOR 2104957. 
    Repr. in Engle, Gale; Taylor, Gabriele (1968). Berkeley's Principles of Human Knowledge: Critical Studies. Belmont, CA: Wadsworth. pp. 24–33.  In this collection of essays, Turbayne’s work comprised two papers that had been published in Philosophy and Phenomenological Research:
  • Turbayne C. M. A Bibliography of George Berkeley 1963-1979 // Berkeley: Critical and Interpretive Essays. Ed. by C. M. Turbayne. Manchester, 1982. ISBN 978-0-8166-1065-5 pp. 313–329.
  • Turbayne, Colin Murray, and Robert Ware. "A Bibliography of George Berkeley, 1933-1962." Journal of Philosophy 60 (1963):93-112.
  • Turbayne, Colin Murray. "The Origin of Berkeley's Paradoxes." In Steinkraus, Warren E., ed. New Studies in Berkeley's Philosophy. New York: Holt, Rinehart and Winston, 1966. Foreword by Brand Blanshard. pp. 31–42.
  • Turbayne, Colin Murray. "Visual Language from the Verbal Model." Visible Language 3 (1969):345-70
  • Turbayne, Colin Murray, ed. Berkeley: Principles of Human Knowledge, Text and Critical Essays. Indianapolis: Bobbs-Merrill, 1970.
    Reviewed by G. P. Conroy. Journal of the History of Philosophy 9 (1971): 510-12; J. M. Beyssade. Études philosophiques 4 (1970):523-26.
  • Turbayne, Colin Murray. "Berkeley's Metaphysical Grammar." In Turbayne. Berkeley, Principles … Text and Critical Essays. 1970. pp. 3–36.
  • Turbayne, Colin Murray. The Myth of Metaphor. With forewords by Morse Peckham and Foster Tait and appendix by Rolf Eberle. Columbia, S. C: University of South Carolina Press, 1970. Rev. of 1962 ed. Spanish ed., Fondo de Cultura Economica, Mexico, 1974. Reviewed by Paul J. Olscamp "The Philosophical Importance of С. M. Turbayne's The Myth of Metaphor." International Philosophical Quarterly 6 (1966): 110-31.
  • Turbayne, С. M., and R. Appelbaum. "A Bibliography of George Berkeley, 1963-1974." Journal of the History of Philosophy 15 (1977):83-95.
  • Turbayne, Colin M. “Grosseteste and an Ancient Optical Principle”, Isis 50 (1959): 467-72.
  • Turbayne, Colin M., ed., Berkeley. Critical and interpretive essays. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 1982.
  • Turbayne, Colin M. “Hume’s Influence on Berkeley.” Revue internationale de philosophie 154 (1985): 259-69.
  • Turbayne, Colin M. Metaphors for the Mind. The Creative Mind and its Origin. Columbia, South Carolina: University of South Carolina Press, 1991.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Murphy, Jeffrie G. “Berkeley and the Metaphor of Mental Substance.” Ratio 7 (1965):171, note 3.
  2. ^ Murphy, Jeffrie G. “Berkeley and the Metaphor of Mental Substance.” Ratio 7 (1965):176.
  3. ^ Colin and Ailsa Turbayne International Berkeley Essay Prize Competition.

External links[edit]