Computer Conservation Society

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Computer Conservation Society
Computer Conservation Society Logo.png
Founded 1989
Type Professional Organisation
Focus History of Computing in the UK
Origins The British Computer Society, Science Museum, MOSI
Area served
UK and worldwide
Method Research, Education, Restorations and Recontructions
Members
1,000+
Website www.computerconservationsociety.org

The Computer Conservation Society (CCS) is a British organization, founded in 1989. It is under the joint umbrella of the British Computer Society, the London Science Museum and the Manchester Museum of Science and Industry.

The CCS is interested in the history of computing in general and the conservation and preservation of early British historical computers in particular.

The society runs a series of monthly public lectures between September and May each year in both London and Manchester. The events are detailed on the society's web site.

The CCS publishes a quarterly bulletin, Resurrection.[1]

Dr Doron Swade, formerly the curator of the computing collection at the Science Museum, was a founding committee member.

The current chair of the society is Mrs Rachel Burnett. The immediate past chair is Dr David Hartley.

Projects[edit]

The society organises a number of projects to reconstruct and maintain early computers and to conserve early software. For example:

Restorations

Reconstructions

Other Projects

  • Software Preservation
  • Our Computer Heritage Website
  • Sale award for computer conservation and restoration

Locations[edit]

London Science Museum:

  • Ferranti Pegasus (Not currently being displayed working)

Museum of Science and Industry, Manchester:

  • Mcr SSEM (Baby)
  • Hartree Differential Analyser

The National Museum of Computing:

  • Colossus
  • Harwell Dekatron or WITCH
  • ICL 2966
  • Elliot 803
  • Elliott 905
  • EDSAC Replica

Bletchley Park Trust:

  • Bombe

Currently not on public display:

  • ICT 1301 (In process of being moved to the National Museum of Computing)
  • Elliott 401

References[edit]

  1. ^ Resurrection, Computer Conservation Society, UK.

External links[edit]