Continuity Associates

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Continuity Studios (formerly Continuity Associates, originally known as Continuity Graphics Associates)[1] is a New York City- and Los Angeles-based art and illustration studio formed by cartoonists Neal Adams and Dick Giordano. Still in business after more than thirty years, the company has showed that the graphic vernacular of the comic book could be employed in profitable endeavors outside the confines of traditional comics.

At its founding in 1971,[1] Continuity primarily supplied motion picture storyboards and advertising art. As times changed, Continuity adapted its services to offer animatics, 3D computer graphics, and conceptual design.

Over the years, Continuity has also served as an art packager for comic book publishers, including such companies as Charlton Comics,[2] Marvel Comics, Adams' own Continuity Comics, and the one-shot Big Apple Comix. The company served as the launching pad for the careers of a number of professional cartoonists. Notable names who worked at Continuity include Terry Austin, Pat Broderick, Howard Chaykin, Larry Hama, Bob Layton, Val Mayerik, Bob McLeod, Al Milgrom, Michael Netzer (Nasser), Carl Potts, Joe Rubinstein, Walt Simonson, Jim Starlin, Greg Theakston, and Bob Wiacek. When doing collective comics work, the artists were often credited as "Crusty Bunkers."

More established cartoonists like Win Mortimer found work at Continuity profitable enough that they left the comics industry to work exclusively on Continuity projects.[3][4]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Eury, Michael and Giordano, Dick. Dick Giordano: Changing Comics, One Day at a Time, TwoMorrows Publishing, 2003.
  2. ^ Hatcher, Greg. "Friday at the License Bureau," Comic Book Resources (Feb. 25, 2006). Accessed March 7, 2009.
  3. ^ Mietkiewicz, Henry. "Win Mortimer (1919-1998)," Joe Shuster Canadian Comic Book Creator Awards. Accessed Mar. 9, 2009.
  4. ^ "Win Mortimer (1919 - 1998)," Superman Super Site. Accessed March 9, 2009.

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