Cuckold (novel)

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Cuckold
Author Kiran Nagarkar
Country India
Language English
Published 1997, HarperCollins India
Media type Print, ebook
Pages 609 pages

Cuckold is a 1997 book by Indian author Kiran Nagarkar and his third novel.[1] It is a historical novel set in the Rajput kingdom of Mewar, India during the 17th century that follows the life of Maharaj Kumar, a fictional character based upon the real life ruler Thakur Bhojraj.[2]

Synopsis[edit]

The book follows the life of Maharaj Kumar and his attempts to win the affections of his wife Mira while war ravages the land around them.

Critical reception[edit]

Cuckold is considered to be one of Nagarkar's most well known novels and in 2000 he won India's National Academy of Letters Award (Sahitya Akademi Award) for the work.[3][4] The book has been praised for its "blending of traditional narrative against a historical backdrop presented with relentless detail".[5] Makarand R. Paranjape considered it to be part of a canon of Indian English novels.[6] Gore Vidal called it "a fascinating book, a sort of fantastic marriage between the Thomas Mann of Royal Highness (Königliche Hoheit (de)) and the Lady Murasaki."[7]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Deshpande, Anirudh (11–17 May 2002). "Interpretative Possibilities of Historical Fiction: Study of Kiran Nagarkar's Cuckold". Economic and Political Weekly 37 (19): 1824–1830. Retrieved 21 October 2013. 
  2. ^ O’BRIEN, IRENE (AUGUST 27, 2005 (p 20)). "Meera's Melody" (PDF). Tehelka. Retrieved 21 October 2013.  Check date values in: |date= (help)
  3. ^ SHARMA, KALPANA (2006). "The artful storyteller". The Hindu. Retrieved 21 October 2013. 
  4. ^ Wiemann, Dirk (2008). Genres of Modernity: Contemporary Indian Novels in English. Rodopi. pp. 131–156. ISBN 9042024933. 
  5. ^ Sanga, Jaina C. (2003). South Asian Novelists in English. Greenwood. p. 179. ISBN 0313318859. 
  6. ^ Paranjape, Makarand R. Paranjape (2009). Another Canon: Indian Texts and Traditions in English. Anthem Press. pp. 130–147. 
  7. ^ "Kiran Nagarkar". New York Review Books. Retrieved October 21, 2013.