Deer Park, Washington

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Deer Park, Washington
City
Location of Deer Park, Washington
Location of Deer Park, Washington
Coordinates: 47°57′25″N 117°28′13″W / 47.95694°N 117.47028°W / 47.95694; -117.47028Coordinates: 47°57′25″N 117°28′13″W / 47.95694°N 117.47028°W / 47.95694; -117.47028
Country United States
State Washington
County Spokane
Government
 • Mayor Robert Whisman
Area[1]
 • Total 6.89 sq mi (17.8 km2)
 • Land 6.89 sq mi (17.8 km2)
 • Water 0 sq mi (0 km2)
Elevation 2,123 ft (647 m)
Population (2010)[2]
 • Total 3,652
 • Estimate (2013[3]) 3,776
 • Density 530.0/sq mi (204.6/km2)
Time zone Pacific (PST) (UTC-8)
 • Summer (DST) PDT (UTC-7)
ZIP code 99006
Area code 509
FIPS code 53-17320
GNIS feature ID 1512143[4]
Website cityofdeerparkwa.com
Deer Park is located in United States
Deer Park
Deer Park
Location in the United States

Deer Park is a city in Spokane County, Washington, United States. The population was 3,652 at the 2010 census, up from 3,017 in 2000.

History[edit]

North of Spokane, the city of Deer Park was officially incorporated 106 years ago on June 24, 1908. Deer Park got its name when railroad surveyors saw deer grazing in the area. It was settled in 1889 when a railroad siding was built for the Spokane Falls & Northern Railway. Soon the Standard Lumber Company sawmill was established by William Short and George Crawford to provide the lumber needed to rebuild the nearby city of Spokane Falls (later renamed Spokane following the great fire of 1889). By 1900 the population of Deer Park was approximately 300 residents. In addition to the sawmill, the community consisted of three general stores (owned separately by P. Kelly, Dan Weis, and A. Baldwin), a blacksmith and harness shop, a livery and feed stable, Jeff Moore's hotel, Dr. Prince's drug store, a public school with approximately 75 students, and a Congregational church led by Rev. F. McConaughy. By this time there were as many as eight sawmills within ten miles of Deer Park, all of which got their supplies in, and employed members of, the town.[5]

Arcadia Apple Orchards Company was established c. 1906, and orchards of apple trees were planted on the land surrounding Deer Park which had been cleared by the logging activity.

The municipal airport east of the city was built during World War II and dedicated 70 years ago in August 1944 with three paved runways, all at 6,100 feet (1,860 m) in length.[6][7][8] During the early 1960s,[9][10][11] an Atlas missile site (567-1) near the airport was operated by the 567th Strategic Missile Squadron of Fairchild AFB.[12] Soon obsolete, the site was decommissioned in 1965 and sold for salvage in 1967.[13][14]

Community events[edit]

Deer Park has a number of annual events. Settlers Days takes place on the last Saturday in July, Summer Concert Series in Mix Park Saturday nights through the summer, a citywide yard sale on the first weekend of August, Round About 5K in September[15] and Winterfest in January.

Geography[edit]

Deer Park is located at 47°57′25″N 117°28′13″W / 47.95694°N 117.47028°W / 47.95694; -117.47028 (47.956922, -117.470230),[16] at an elevation of 2,123 feet (647 m) above sea level.

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 6.89 square miles (17.85 km2), all of it land.[1]

Climate[edit]

This region experiences warm (but not hot) and dry summers, with no average monthly temperatures above 71.6 °F. According to the Köppen Climate Classification system, Deer Park has a warm-summer Mediterranean climate, abbreviated "Csb" on climate maps.[17]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1910 875
1920 1,103 26.1%
1930 1,009 −8.5%
1940 1,070 6.0%
1950 1,167 9.1%
1960 1,333 14.2%
1970 1,295 −2.9%
1980 2,140 65.3%
1990 2,278 6.4%
2000 3,017 32.4%
2010 3,652 21.0%
Est. 2013 3,776 3.4%
U.S. Decennial Census[18]
2013 Estimate[19]

2010 census[edit]

As of the census[2] of 2010, there were 3,652 people, 1,394 households, and 948 families residing in the city. The population density was 530.0 inhabitants per square mile (204.6/km2). There were 1,532 housing units at an average density of 222.4 per square mile (85.9/km2). The racial makeup of the city was 92.6% White, 0.4% African American, 1.5% Native American, 0.2% Asian, 0.3% Pacific Islander, 1.2% from other races, and 3.9% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 3.8% of the population.

There were 1,394 households of which 36.4% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 49.4% were married couples living together, 13.4% had a female householder with no husband present, 5.2% had a male householder with no wife present, and 32.0% were non-families. 27.0% of all households were made up of individuals and 14.3% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.61 and the average family size was 3.15.

The median age in the city was 36.3 years. 28.4% of residents were under the age of 18; 8.8% were between the ages of 18 and 24; 22.5% were from 25 to 44; 24% were from 45 to 64; and 16.2% were 65 years of age or older. The gender makeup of the city was 48.8% male and 51.2% female.

2000 census[edit]

As of the census of 2000, there were 3,017 people, 1,105 households, and 756 families residing in the city. The population density was 470.4 people per square mile (181.7/km²). There were 1,210 housing units at an average density of 188.7 per square mile (72.9/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 89.90% White, 2.3% African American, 1.36% Native American, 0.17% Asian, 0.07% Pacific Islander, 1.06% from other races, and 2.12% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 3.09% of the population. 22.2% were of German, 13.9% United States or American, 11.1% English, 7.2% Irish, 5.4% Norwegian and 5.2% French ancestry according to Census 2000.

There were 1,105 households out of which 38.7% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 50.2% were married couples living together, 13.3% had a female householder with no husband present, and 31.5% were non-families. 26.6% of all households were made up of individuals and 14.2% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.69 and the average family size was 3.24.

In the city the age distribution of the population shows 32.5% under the age of 18, 7.3% from 18 to 24, 27.5% from 25 to 44, 18.0% from 45 to 64, and 14.7% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 34 years. For every 100 females there were 91.1 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 83.8 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $32,470, and the median income for a family was $37,820. Males had a median income of $36,326 versus $19,825 for females. The per capita income for the city was $17,132. About 10.8% of families and 15.1% of the population were below the poverty line, including 17.5% of those under age 18 and 21.3% of those age 65 or over.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "US Gazetteer files 2010". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2012-12-19. 
  2. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2012-12-19. 
  3. ^ "Population Estimates". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2014-05-30. 
  4. ^ "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  5. ^ Edwards, Jonathan (1847-1929) (1900). Illustrated history of Spokane county, state of Washington. W.H. Lever. pp. 278–279. 
  6. ^ "Deer Park puts self on air map". Spokesman-Review. August 21, 1944. p. 1. 
  7. ^ "Deer Park holds rites at airport". Spokane Daily Chronicle. August 21, 1944. p. 8. 
  8. ^ "Deer Park Municipal Airport". City of Deer Park. Retrieved June 2, 2014. 
  9. ^ "Missile fortress takes shape at Deer Park". Spokane Daily Chronicle. January 27, 1960. p. 12. 
  10. ^ Petty, Robert W. (April 12, 1960). "Missile sites take shape". Spokane Daily Chronicle. p. 8. 
  11. ^ "Atlas gear tested". Spokane Daily Chronicle. January 5, 1961. p. 3. 
  12. ^ "Spokane area missile sites near completion". Spokane Daily Chronicle. December 9, 1960. p. 12. 
  13. ^ Petty, Robert W. (July 1, 1965). "Atlas missile era is ended". Spokane Daily Chronicle. p. 1. 
  14. ^ "Last Atlas sites sold for salvage". Spokane Daily Chronicle. May 31, 1967. p. b3. 
  15. ^ http://www.roundabout5k.com/
  16. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 
  17. ^ Climate Summary for Deer Park, Washington
  18. ^ United States Census Bureau. "Census of Population and Housing". Retrieved August 3, 2013. 
  19. ^ "Annual Estimates of the Resident Population: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2013". Retrieved May 30, 2014. 

External links[edit]