Donald E. Pease

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Donald E. Pease
Nationality American
Occupation Cultural critic, educator
Known for Theory of American Exceptionalism

Donald E. Pease is the Ted and Helen Geisel Third Century Professor in the Humanities, Chair of the Master of Arts in Liberal Studies Program, Professor of English and Comparative Literature at Dartmouth College. He is an Americanist, literary and cultural critic, and academic. Pease directs the annual Futures of American Studies Institute.[1]

Education and academic career[edit]

Pease earned a B.A. (1968) and M.A. (1969) at the University of Missouri and a Ph.D. in English from the University of Chicago (1973). He has been on the faculty of Dartmouth College since 1973.

Fellowships and honors[edit]

Pease has held fellowships from the Guggenheim, Mellon, Ford, and Hewlett foundations. He has received two National Endowment for the Humanities grants to direct programs for college teachers on the subject of nineteenth-century American Literature. Professor Pease serves on the Board of Governors of the Clinton Institute in American Studies and received the Dartmouth College Faculty Award for Service to Alumni Continuing Education in 1999, awarded by Dartmouth's Alumni Council. In 2000 he was a guest lecturer for the Drue Heinz Visiting Professor at Oxford University. Professor Pease has been Distinguished Visiting Professor at the JFK Institute in American Studies at the Freie Universität Berlin; the State University of New York at Buffalo, and the University of Rome Tor Vergata. The Faculty of Languages at Uppsala University (Sweden) awarded Pease a doctorate honoris causa in 2011.[1] In 2012 the American Studies Association (ASA) awarded Pease the Carl Bode-Norman Holmes Pearson Prize for Outstanding Contributions to American Studies.[2][3]

Bibliography[edit]

Writer[edit]

  • Visionary Compacts: American Renaissance Writings in Cultural Context (University of Wisconsin Press, 1987).
  • The New American Exceptionalism (University of Minnesota Press, 2009).
  • Theodor Seuss Geisel (Oxford University Press, 2010).

Editor[edit]

  • The American Renaissance Reconsidered: Selected Papers of the English Institute, 1982-1983 (Johns Hopkins University Press, 1985) with Walter Benn Michaels.
  • New Essays on the Rise of Silas Lapham (Cambridge University Press, 1991).
  • Cultures of U.S. Imperialism (Duke University Press, 1992) with Amy Kaplan.
  • National Identities and Postnational Narratives (Duke University Press, 1994).
  • New Americanists: Revisionist Interventions into the Canon (Duke University Press, 1994).
  • Futures of American Studies (Duke University Press, 2002).

Selected chapters/sections of books[edit]

  • "J. Hillis Miller: The Other Victorian at Yale", in The Yale Critics: Deconstruction in America, ed. Arac et al. (University of Minnesota Press, 1983).
  • "Author", in Critical Terms for Literary Study, 2nd edition, eds. Lentricchia and McLaughlin (University of Chicago Press, 1995).

Selected articles[edit]

  • "Regulating Multi-Adhoccerists, Fish('s) Rules", Critical Inquiry 23.2 (1997):396-418.
  • "C. L. R. James, Moby Dick, and the Emergence of Transnational American Studies", Arizona Quarterly 56.3 (2000).
  • "Doing Justice to C. L. R. James's Mariners, Renegades, and Castaways," boundary 2 27.2 (2000):1-19.
  • "Hawthorne in the Custom-House: The Metapolitics, Postpolitics, and Politics of The Scarlet Letter". boundary 2 32.1 (2005).
  • "Dr. Seuss in Ted Geisel's Never-Never Land", PMLA 126.1 (2011):197-202.

External links[edit]

References[edit]