Duck Samford Stadium

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Duck Samford Stadium
"The Duck"
Duck Samford Stadium home stands.jpg
Location 1600 East University Drive
Auburn, Alabama, USA
Coordinates 32°36′37″N 85°26′49″W / 32.61028°N 85.44694°W / 32.61028; -85.44694Coordinates: 32°36′37″N 85°26′49″W / 32.61028°N 85.44694°W / 32.61028; -85.44694
Broke ground 1968
Opened October 25, 1968
Owner Auburn City Schools
Operator Auburn City Schools
Surface Grass
Construction cost $1.1 million
Capacity 8,310
Record attendance 10,000+ (November 27, 2009)
Tenants
Auburn High School Tigers (AHSAA) (1968-Present)
J. F. Drake High School Wildcats (AHSAA) (1968-1969)

Duck Samford Stadium is a stadium in Auburn, Alabama. It is primarily used for American football and soccer, and is the home field of the Auburn High School Tigers. Duck Samford Stadium was constructed in 1968, and seats 8,310 spectators.[1] The field is named after James Drake "Duck" Samford, a former Auburn University football player and longtime supporter of youth athletics in Auburn who donated the land for the facility.[2]

History[edit]

Plans for constructing a stadium to replace Felton Little Park—which had served as Auburn High School's home field since 1949—on the site now occupied by Duck Samford Stadium began in 1964.[3] On March 23, 1965, James "Duck" Samford donated the 40.2-acre (163,000 m2) site to the City of Auburn.[4] In May 1967, the Auburn City Schools agreed to a ten-year lease of the proposed stadium, which the city of Auburn constructed the following year for $1.1 million.[5] The stadium opened on October 25, 1968 with an Auburn High School loss to Lanett High School, 14-13; the first home win at the venue came three weeks later against arch-rival Opelika High School, 41-0. The original seating consisted of what is today the home (east) stands, and seated 3,986.[6]

In 1974, a fieldhouse was constructed behind the north endzone.[7] The stadium was expanded in 1984 to include a visitors' seating section on the west side of the stadium, which increased capacity to 6,000.[8] A further expansion in 1993 increased the west side stands to increase the stadium's capacity to 7,120. The stadium underwent a $2.0 million renovation in 2004, with the east side stands completely replaced.[9] At the same time, the existing turf was replaced with TifSport Certified Bermuda grass, the same playing surface as at the University of Texas's Darrell K Royal-Texas Memorial Stadium and the Washington Redskins' FedEx Field.[10] In 2005, ownership of Duck Samford was transferred from the City of Auburn to the Auburn City School District. The 35-year old original fieldhouse was torn down and replaced by the Travis L. Rabren Fieldhouse in 2009.[11] In 2010, a $705,000 expansion resulted in the construction of new restrooms, replacement of the scoreboard, and additional seating to bring the stadium's capacity to 8,310.[12]

Miscellaneous[edit]

Duck Samford Stadium is part of the Duck Samford Sports Complex, which also includes ten baseball fields, a walking trail, and two multi-use fields. The complex hosted the 2005 Dixie Youth World Series.[13]

Through 2011, the Auburn High School football team has a 153-95-1 record at Duck Samford Stadium, a winning percentage of 0.616. The stadium has hosted sixteen Alabama High School Athletic Association football playoff games; in those matches, Auburn High School has an 8-8 record.[14]

Duck Samford Stadium is the site of the City of Auburn's Fourth of July fireworks display.[15]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Auburn Bulletin, October 23, 1968; "Rep. Mike Hubbard Secures Funding for Duck Samford Stadium Renovations", August 17, 2010.
  2. ^ Elizabeth D. Schafer, Auburn Football. (Charleston, SC: Arcadia, 2004), 27; Minutes of City Board of Education, Auburn, Alabama, March 1965.
  3. ^ Minutes of City Board of Education, Auburn, Alabama, December 1964.
  4. ^ Minutes of City Board of Education, Auburn, Alabama, March 1965.
  5. ^ Minutes of City Board of Education, Auburn, Alabama, May 1967.
  6. ^ Auburn Bulletin, October 23, 1968; Auburn Bulletin, November 20, 1968; "A Winning Field", Tiger Tales, November 27, 1968.
  7. ^ Minutes of City Board of Education, Auburn, Alabama, February 1974.
  8. ^ Minutes of City Board of Education, Auburn, Alabama, May 1984.
  9. ^ Some of the projects published by Bid Ocean in 2004 in the state of Alabama, retrieved July 21, 2007.
  10. ^ TifSport Stadium and Athletic Field Installations, retrieved July 21, 2007.
  11. ^ Rachel Morand, "Contractors honor family with donation to AHS", The Auburn Villager, March 27, 2009.
  12. ^ "Rep. Mike Hubbard Secures Funding for Duck Samford Stadium Renovations", August 17, 2010.
  13. ^ Auburn Parks and Recreation Department Athletic Facility Application, retrieved July 21, 2007; Auburn Parks and Rec Baseball Fields, retrieved July 21, 2007; City of Auburn to be site of the 2005 State Dixie Youth Majors 50th World Series, retrieved July 21, 2007.
  14. ^ AHSFHS.org, Auburn Yearly Record, retrieved November 4, 2011.
  15. ^ Lindsay Field, "Happy 4th", Opelika-Auburn News, July 3, 2007.
Preceded by
Felton Little Park
Home of the
Auburn High School Tigers

1968 — present
Succeeded by
Current