Dutchess County Court House

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Dutchess County Court House
Courthouse in 2007. Yellow ribbon banner indicates support for local U.S. servicemembers in Iraq.
Location Poughkeepsie, NY
Coordinates 41°42′14″N 73°55′46″W / 41.70389°N 73.92944°W / 41.70389; -73.92944Coordinates: 41°42′14″N 73°55′46″W / 41.70389°N 73.92944°W / 41.70389; -73.92944
Built 1903[1]
Architect William J. Beardsley
Architectural style Classical Revival
Governing body Dutchess County
MPS Historic Resources of the City of Pouhkeepsie
NRHP Reference # 82001130
Added to NRHP 1982

The Dutchess County Courthouse is located at 10 Market Street in downtown Poughkeepsie, New York, United States. It is the third[2] county courthouse to stand on that site.

The first was authorized by the provincial assembly in 1717 and built in 1720, and would host New York's debate on ratifying the U.S. Constitution during the brief period when Poughkeepsie served as the state capital in 1788. It was destroyed in an 1806 fire. Three years later the state legislature appropriated funds for a new one, which stood for almost a century. An early tenant beside the courts was Matthew Vassar, later founder of Vassar College, who ran a saloon and oyster bar in the basement.[3]

It was replaced by the current structure, built in 1903 at a cost of a half million dollars and opened and dedicated just before the end of the year. It was designed by local architect William J. Beardsley in a Classical Revival style, a four-story building with red brick facing and Palladian windows in the second and fifth-story center bays with stucco decoration above. Because of a requirement in the original deed for the land, one of the original 1720 courthouse's jail cells must remain in the basement of this or any subsequent court building.[1]

Later alterations were made under the direction of Charles Cooke, who designed the nearby offices of the Poughkeepsie Journal. The building's cornice is the only element that has been significantly changed from the original design.[1][4] It has also been joined to the Poughkeepsie Trust Company building to its immediate east on Main Street, which serves as the district attorney's offices.

In 1982, it was added to the National Register of Historic Places. Today, it houses judges' chambers and clerks' offices as well as courtrooms. Most of the court's lesser functions, such as property recordkeeping, have been moved to an annex next door, built in the 1960s. In the late 1990s, it was the venue for former Dutchess assistant district attorney Stephen Pagones's defamation suit against Al Sharpton, C. Vernon Mason and Alton Maddox over allegations they made against him during the Tawana Brawley affair.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Sharp, Townley (August 7, 1980). "National Register of Historic Places nomination, Dutchess County Court House". Retrieved 2008-01-08. 
  2. ^ Or fifth, cf. WPA Dutchess County Guide.
  3. ^ "9th Judicial District, Dutchess County". 2004. Retrieved 2008-01-09. 
  4. ^ Larger FRP corbels and dentils bolted on in mid 1980s.

External links[edit]