Earthborn

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Earthborn
OSChomecoming5.jpg
Author Orson Scott Card
Country United States
Language English
Series Homecoming Saga
Genre Science fiction
Publisher Tor Books
Publication date
1995
Media type Print (Hardcover & Paperback)
Pages 378 pp
ISBN 0-312-93040-2
OCLC 32329155
813/.54 20
LC Class PS3553.A655 E47 1995
Preceded by Earthfall

Earthborn (1995) is the concluding fifth book of the Homecoming Saga by Orson Scott Card. The Homecoming saga is a fictionalization of the first few hundred years recorded in the Book of Mormon.

Plot summary[edit]

Five centuries after the conclusion of Earthfall, there is only one original colonist from Harmony: Shedemei, who now wears the Cloak of the Starmaster (a device that links her to the Oversoul). After hundreds of years, the descendants of Nafai and Elemak have built cities and towns - yet never forgetting the enmity between the two brothers. After hundreds of years, the Oversoul still has not achieved its original purpose: to find the Keeper of Earth, the central intelligence that alone can repair the Oversoul's damaged counterpart at Harmony.

But now, the Keeper has once again begun to spread its influence. Heeding the dreams below, Shedemei has decided to return to Earth.

The last book in the Homecoming saga marks a departure from the style and storyline of the previous four. All of the characters from the previous novels (except Shedemei) are long dead. The central conflict between Nafai and Elemak is represented in their descendants, but takes a back seat in this book. The focus is on the struggles within the descendants of those who followed Nafai. The king of Darakemba (an empire founded by the Nafaris), his children, and his advisers, along with the high priest of Darakemba, his children, and his converts, provide the main actions in the story.

Religious overtones[edit]

The science fiction elements in this book are overshadowed by the blossoming of the religious overtones (Mormon) evident since the first book. The emphasis on faith in the invisible Keeper, the evils of pride, and the importance of tolerance are consistently woven within the struggles of the characters.

See also[edit]

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