Edward Stanley Kellogg

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Edward Stanley Kellogg
16th Governor of American Samoa
In office
September 4, 1923 – March 17, 1925
Preceded by Edwin Taylor Pollock
Succeeded by Henry Francis Bryan
Personal details
Born August 20, 1870
Morrisania, Bronx, New York City, New York
Died January 8, 1948(1948-01-08) (aged 77)
National Naval Medical Center, Bethesda, Maryland
Alma mater United States Naval Academy
Occupation Naval officer
Military service
Allegiance  United States
Service/branch United States Navy Seal United States Navy
Years of service 1892 - 1920, 1923 - 1925
Rank US-O6 insignia.svg Captain

Edward Stanley Kellogg (August 20, 1870 – January 8, 1948) was a United States Navy Captain who served as the 16th Governor of American Samoa. Kellogg graduated from the United States Naval Academy in 1892, and joined the Naval Engineer Corps. He served as an assistant engineer on numerous ships, and participated in the Spanish–American War. He retired in 1920, and became governor three years later, making him only one of two Naval Governors of American Samoa to hold the office following retirement from the service. As Governor, Kellogg asserted the authority of the United States over the tribal chiefs of the islands. He removed the title of Tu'i Manu'a from Chris Young, claiming it implied king-like authority over the people of American Samoa. He also removed Chief Tui Manu'a from power, resulting in widespread protest among the islands' people. Kellogg died at the National Naval Medical Center in Maryland and was buried at Arlington National Cemetery.

Life[edit]

Kellogg was born on August 20, 1870 in Morrisania, Bronx.[1] He died on January 8, 1948 at the National Naval Medical Center in Bethesda, Maryland.[1][2] He was buried at Arlington National Cemetery on January 12, 1948.[2]

Naval career[edit]

Kellogg was appointed to the United States Naval Academy from New York on May 18, 1888, graduating on June 3, 1892.[1] In 1894, he became an assistant engineer in the Naval Engineer Corps. He served on the USS San Francisco (C-5) before being transferred to the USS Yorktown (PG-1) on April 26, 1895.[1] As a Lieutenant, he served on the USS Hartford.[3] During the Spanish–American War, Kellogg was the assistant engineer aboard the USS Hist. In 1920, he retired from the Navy with the rank of Captain.[1]

Governorship[edit]

Kellogg took the office of Governor of American Samoa on September 4, 1923 and served until March 17, 1925.[2] As governor, he prohibited certain native death ceremonies, imposing a small fine and imprisonment on those who continued to practice the customs.[2] Along with John Martin Poyer, Kellogg is one of only two Naval Governors of American Samoa who served in the office following retirement from the Navy.[2] He came into some dispute with Chris Young, a man elected as Tu'i Manu'a, or king, of American Samoa by several chiefs. Kellogg argued that the idea was incompatible with the Constitution of the United States and denied Young the title.[4] Kellogg also dealt with the removal of Chief Tui Manu'a and his placement under house arrest, after other Samoan chiefs called him a "disturbing influence".[5] Inaccurate rumors were spread that Kellogg had banished him from the islands, causing widespread protest and declarations that he was ruling as a despot.[6]

Bibliography[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e "Captain Edward Stanley Kellogg, USN: An Inventory of His Collection in the Navy Department Library". Washington, D.C.: Naval History & Heritage Command. July 20, 2004. Retrieved 4 July 2010. 
  2. ^ a b c d e Sorensen, Stan; Joseph Theroux. "The Samoan Historical Calendar, 1606-2007". Government of American Samoa. pp. 3; 10; 68. Retrieved 4 July 2010. 
  3. ^ Annual register of the United States Naval Academy, Annapolis, Md. 60-64. Annapolis, Maryland: United States Naval Academy. 1904. p. 25. Retrieved 4 July 2010. 
  4. ^ "Deposed Island King Sues: American Asks Damages Because Samoan Title Was Taken Away". The New York Times (New York City). The New York Times Company. 4 April 1925. p. 5. 
  5. ^ "Article 3". The New York Times (New York City). The New York Times Company. 28 August 1924. p. 9. 
  6. ^ "Samoan Natives Demand Chief Back: Protest to Coolidge on Banishment, Which American Governor Denies". The New York Times (New York City). The New York Times Company. 28 August 1924. p. 9.