Elizabeth Jordan Carr

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Elizabeth Jordan Carr
Born (1981-12-28) December 28, 1981 (age 32)
Norfolk, Virginia, U.S.
Residence Groton, Massachusetts
Other names Elizabeth Jordan Comeau
Education Simmons College
Occupation Journalist
Employer The Boston Globe
Known for First "test-tube baby" in the United States
Title Social Media Marketing Manager
Spouse(s) David Comeau
Children Trevor James Comeau
Born: (2010-08-05) August 5, 2010 (age 3)
Parents Judith and Roger Carr

Elizabeth Jordan Carr (born December 28, 1981 at 7:46 am) was the United States' first baby born from the in-vitro fertilization procedure and the 15th in the world. The technique was conducted at Eastern Virginia Medical School in Norfolk under the direction of Doctors Howard Jones and Georgeanna Seegar Jones, who were the first to attempt the process in the United States. She was delivered at Norfolk General Hospital in Norfolk, Virginia by Dr. Mason Andrews weighing 5 pounds 12 ounces[1][2][3] (about 2600 g).

The parents of Carr were Judith Carr, a 28-year-old schoolteacher at the time, and her husband, Roger Carr, 30, of Westminster, Massachusetts. Elizabeth's mother had been unable to conceive normally because complications during earlier unsuccessful pregnancies had forced removal of her fallopian tubes.[1]

A graduate of Simmons College in Boston, Massachusetts,[4] Carr worked as a journalist for a newspaper in Maine, Central Maine Newspapers in Augusta, which publishes the Kennebec Journal and Morning Sentinel. They are part of the Seattle Times Family group of newspapers. Following her time in Maine, Carr began work at Boston.com, the Boston Globe's online presence.

Carr was named number one Portland Magazine's 2007 list of Maine's Most Intriguing People.

Dr. Howard Jones, 98, visits with Elizabeth Carr Comeau and her husband, David, at the Jones Institute for Reproductive Medicine in Norfolk on Thursday, July 24, 2008.[5]

On August 5, 2010, Carr gave birth to her first child, Trevor James Comeau. He was conceived naturally.[6] [7]

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References[edit]

  1. ^ a b 'TEST-TUBE' BABY BORN IN U.S., JOINING SUCCESSES AROUND THE WORLD New York Times | By: Walter Sullivan | Published: December 29, 1981
  2. ^ Reason.com Happy 25th Birthday to Elizabeth Jordan Carr Reason.com Blog | By: Ronald Bailey | Published: December 28, 2006
  3. ^ Georgeanna Jones Dies at 92; In Vitro Fertilization Pioneer Washington Post | By: Joe Holley, Staff Writer | Published: March 28, 2005
  4. ^ IVF Child in US Meets Doctor NBC News | Updated: October 31, 2003
  5. ^ Nation's first test-tube baby is back to visit an old friend The Virginian-Pilot | By: Nancy Young | Published: July 25, 2008.
  6. ^ America's First Test-Tube Baby Becomes A Mom The Virginian-Pilot | By: Elizabeth Simpson | Published: August 7, 2010
  7. ^ A first for the first Boston Globe | By Elizabeth Comeau, Globe Staff | Published: August 6, 2010

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