Emily Cain

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Emily Cain
Member of the Maine Senate
from the 30th district
Incumbent
Assumed office
December 5, 2012
Preceded by Elizabeth Schneider
Member of the Maine House of Representatives
from the 19th district
In office
January 1, 2005 – December 5, 2012
Preceded by Joanne Twomey
Succeeded by Ryan D. Tipping-Spitz
Personal details
Born Emily Ann Cain
(1980-03-29) March 29, 1980 (age 34)
Louisville, Kentucky
Political party Democrat
Spouse(s) Daniel B. Williams
Residence Orono, Maine
Profession Politician
Religion Roman Catholic
Website Maine Senate Website
Campaign Website

Emily Ann Cain (born March 29, 1980) is an American politician from Maine. A member of the Democratic Party, Cain has served in the Maine Senate since 2012, representing the 30th district which includes part of Penobscot County. She was previously a member of the Maine House of Representatives from 2004 to 2012, where she served as Minority Leader from 2010 to 2012.

Cain is currently the Democratic nominee for the U.S. House of Representatives for Maine's 2nd congressional district.[1][2]

Early life, education and career[edit]

Emily Cain was born in Louisville, Kentucky. Her father ran stores for Florsheim Shoes and later worked for Bass Shoes in Kennebunk, Maine. Her mother worked with the deaf as a sign-language interpreter and educator. She grew up in Illinois and graduated from Lawrence High School in New Jersey.[3] Cain moved to Orono, living with relatives, while studying at the University of Maine. She received her Bachelor of Music Education in 2002, writing her honor thesis entitled "Technology & Middle School Philosophy: Applications in Music Education".[4][5] In 2004, Cain graduated from Harvard University, receiving her Master of Education in Higher Education.[4] She is currently working on her Ph.D. in Public Policy from the University of Maine.[6]

After graduating in 2002, Cain worked as an Associate Higher Education Professional at the University of Maine Honors College.[7] In 2004, she worked as a Special Assistant for Presidential Events at the University of Maine Alumni Association, and was the Special Assistant for Communications to the President of the University of Maine.[7]

Maine Legislature[edit]

Maine House of Representatives[edit]

She was elected to the Maine House of Representatives in 2004 at the age of 24, defeating Republican William Reed and Green Independent Mark Horton; receiving over 60% of the vote.[8] She was reelected to a second term with 78% of the vote, defeating Republican Lance Cowan in 2006, and won a third term running unopposed in the general election in 2008.[9][10] She won her fourth term to the house in 2010, defeating Republican Zachary David Jackman with 67% of the vote.[11] In her final term in the Maine House, during the 125th legislature, Cain served as the Minority Leader from 2010 to 2012.

During her time in the House, Cain served on the Education and Cultural Affairs Committee and the Joint Rules Committee. She served as Chair of the Joint Select Committee on Research, Economic Development and the Innovation Economy in 2006, and also served as the Chair of the Appropriations Subcommittee on School District Reorganization in 2007.[12]

In 2009, Cain was one of over sixty co-sponsors in the House of LD 1020, legalizing same-sex marriage in Maine.[13] At a house hearing in 2009, Cain said that "Equality was one of the main reasons why I ran for legislature. Marriage is not about gender and sexuality, it’s about keeping Maine families together."[14]

Maine Senate[edit]

In December 2011, Cain announced she would seek to replace fellow Democrat Elizabeth Schneider in the Maine Senate, running for Maine's 30th district. Schneider was unable to run due to term-limits, as Cain was also unable run for the House of Representatives again because of the same limits.[15] She won in the democratic primary, later defeating Republican Roderick Hathaway with 62% of the vote in the November general election.[16] Cain served as a state delegate for Maine at the 2012 Democratic National Convention.[17]

Cain serves on the Senate Appropriations and Financial Affairs Committee, and is currently the Chair of the Senate Government Oversight Committee.[18]

In April 2013, Cain co-sponsored a Joint Amendment supporting comprehensive immigration reform that addresses "earned legalization with a path to citizenship, updated future immigration of families and workers and improved immigration enforcement and border security."[19][20] Cain has also co-sponsored a Joint Amendment calling on congress to support an amendment to the United States Constitution overturning the Supreme Court decision Citizens United v. Federal Election Commission, in order to "regulate the raising and spending of money in elections".[21][22]

2014 Congressional campaign[edit]

Cain won the primary election for Maine's 2nd congressional district, beating State Senate Majority Leader Troy Dale Jackson and will go on to face former State Treasurer Bruce Poliquin in the general election. [2]

Personal life[edit]

Cain is married to Daniel B. Williams, who has served as the Executive Director of the Collins Center for the Arts at the University of Maine since 2014, and is a former member of the Maine House of Representatives.[23] They currently reside in Orono, Maine.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Du Houx, Ramona (June 14, 2013). "Emily Cain announces bid for US Congress- field to expand". Maine Insights. Retrieved 21 June 2013. 
  2. ^ a b Moretto, Mario (June 10, 2014). "Emily Cain wins Democrats’ 2nd District primary". Bangor Daily News. Retrieved 11 June 2014. 
  3. ^ Maine Central Institute. "Representative Emily Cain". mci-school.org. 
  4. ^ a b University of Maine. "People - Emily Cain". umaine.edu. 
  5. ^ Emily Ann Cain; University of Maine (May 1, 2002). "Technology & Middle School Philosophy: Applications in Music Education". umaine.edu. 
  6. ^ University of Maine (November 12, 2010). "Honors College Staffer Emily Cain Among Honored Alumni". umaine.edu. 
  7. ^ a b Project Vote Smart. "Senator Emily Ann Cain's Biography". votesmart.org. 
  8. ^ Maine Department of the Secretary of State (November 2, 2004). "General Election Tabulations November 2, 2004 STATE REPRESENTATIVE". maine.gov. 
  9. ^ Maine Department of the Secretary of State (November 7, 2006). "General Election Tabulations November 7, 2006 State Representative by District". maine.gov. 
  10. ^ Maine Department of the Secretary of State (November 4, 2008). "General Election Tabulations November 4, 2008 State Representative Districts 1-50". maine.gov. 
  11. ^ Maine Department of the Secretary of State (November 2, 2010). "General Election Tabulations November 2, 2010 State Representative by District and Town". maine.gov. 
  12. ^ "Biographical Profile for Emily Ann Cain". vote-me.org. 
  13. ^ Macey Hall; The Maine Campus (April 20, 2009). "Mainers to speak on gay marriage bill April 22". mainecampus.com. 
  14. ^ Abigail Cuffey; University of Southern Maine Free Press (April 27, 2009). "Gay marriage bill debated in Augusta". usmfreepress.org. 
  15. ^ "Cain declares candidacy for state Senate". Sun Journal (Lewiston). December 14, 2011. Retrieved 20 December 2011. 
  16. ^ Maine Department of the Secretary of State (November 6, 2012). "November 6, 2012 General Election Tabulations State Senate by District and Town". maine.gov. 
  17. ^ Real Clear Politics (September 6, 2012). "GOP sees Biden as a boon, but Dems stand by him". cbsnews.com. 
  18. ^ Bangor Daily News (March 4, 2013). "Community meeting in Orono to focus on state’s proposed budget". bangordailynews.com. 
  19. ^ Project Vote Smart (April 30, 2013). "SP 550 - Alleges Support For Comprehensive Immigration Reform - Key Vote". votesmart.org. 
  20. ^ Project Vote Smart. "STATE OF MAINE IN THE YEAR OF OUR LORD TWO THOUSAND AND THIRTEEN JOINT RESOLUTION TO SUPPORT COMPREHENSIVE IMMIGRATION REFORM". votesmart.org. 
  21. ^ Project Vote Smart (April 30, 2013). "SP 548 - Urges Congress to Adopt a Constitutional Amendment Regarding Campaign Finance - Key Vote". votesmart.org. 
  22. ^ Maine Legislature. "STATE OF MAINE IN THE YEAR OF OUR LORD TWO THOUSAND AND THIRTEEN JOINT RESOLUTION MEMORIALIZING THE UNITED STATES CONGRESS TO PASS A CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENT TO REVERSE THE RULING OF THE UNITED STATES SUPREME COURT IN CITIZENS UNITED V. FEDERAL ELECTION COMMISSION". mainelegislature.org. 
  23. ^ University of Maine (January 7, 2008). "Williams Appointed to University of Maine Foundation Post". umaine.edu. 

External links[edit]

  • [1] Official website of the Maine House Minority Leader
  • [2] Official campaign website