Evgeny Bareev

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Evgeny Bareev
Jewgeni-Barejew.jpg
Full name Евгений Ильгизович Бареев
Country  Soviet Union
 Russia
Born (1966-11-21) 21 November 1966 (age 47)
Yemanzhelinsk, Chelyabinsk Oblast, USSR
Title Grandmaster
FIDE rating 2663 (July 2014)
(No. 83 on the March 2011 FIDE ratings list)
Peak rating 2739 (October 2003)

Evgeny Bareev (born in a Tatar family on 21 November 1966) is a Russian (formerly Soviet) chess Grandmaster and chess coach. In October 2003, he was in fourth place in the world rankings, with an Elo rating of 2739.

Bareev was World Under-16 Champion in 1982 when his talent was first showcased internationally. Bareev was a member of the Russian national team in the two Chess Olympiads of 1994 and 1996. The biggest success in his career was winning the Corus super-tournament in Wijk aan Zee 2002. In this event he scored 9/13 ahead of elite players like Alexander Grischuk, Michael Adams, Alexander Morozevich, and Peter Leko. In a man vs. machine contest in January 2003, Bareev took on the chess program HIARCS in a four game-match: all four games were drawn. In the Enghien-les-Bains tournament held in France in 2003, Bareev finished in first place.

He was a second to Vladimir Kramnik in his triumphant 2000 World championship match against Garry Kasparov.

His most notable participation in the World Chess Championship events was the Candidates Tournament for the Classical World Chess Championship 2004 in Dortmund 2002. Bareev reached the semi-finals, but lost his match against Veselin Topalov.

At the 2005 Chess World Cup, Bareev qualified for the Candidates Tournament for the FIDE World Chess Championship 2007, played in May–June 2007. He won his first round match against Judit Polgár (+2-1=3), but was eliminated when he lost his second round match against Peter Leko (+0-2=3).

In 2010 he tied for 1st-4th with Konstantin Chernyshov, Le Quang Liem and Ernesto Inarkiev in the Moscow Open.[1]

From 2010 to 2011, Bareev was the head coach of the Russian men's chess team.[2]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Chernyshov wins Moscow Open 2010". ChessBase. 2010-02-08. Retrieved 2 May 2010. 
  2. ^ "Alexander Riazantsev appointed Russia’s head coach". Chessdom. 2011-09-20. Retrieved 21 September 2011. 

External links[edit]