Farman F.40

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F.40
1916farman-f40-01z.jpg
Portuguese Farman F.40 in Mozambique, during the East African Campaign of World War I
Role reconnaissance/observation biplane
Manufacturer Farman Aviation Works
Designer Henry Farman
Introduction 1915
Retired 1922

The Farman F.40 was a French pusher biplane reconnaissance aircraft.

Development[edit]

Developed from a mix of the Maurice Farman designed MF.11 and the Henry Farman designed HF.22, the F.40 (popularly dubbed the Horace Farman) had an overall smoother outline and smoother crew nacelle. A pair of upper tail booms supported a horizontal tailplane and a curved fin. The aircraft went into production in 1915.

Operational history[edit]

Forty French Air Force escadrilles (squadrons) were equipped with F.40s. They operated for just over a year, but were replaced in early 1917.

The F.40 was also operated by the No. 5 Wing of the Royal Naval Air Service, Belgian forces in France, and also by the Russians

Italian aircraft maker Savoia-Marchetti built F.40s for use by the police force until 1922.

Variants[edit]

  • F.40P - adaption to fire Le Prieur rockets
  • F.41 - shorter wingspan
  • F.56 - larger 127-kW (170-hp) Renault engine
  • F.60 - larger 142-kW (190-hp) Renault engine
  • F.61 - F.41 with 142-kW (190-hp) Renault engine

Operators[edit]

 Belgium
 Brazil
 Colombia
 France
 Greece
 Italy
 Netherlands
  • One aircraft only.
 Norway
 Portugal
 Romania
 Russia
 Serbia
 Soviet Union
 United Kingdom
 United States
 Venezuela

Specifications[edit]

Data from [1]

General characteristics

  • Capacity: 2
  • Length: 9.25 m (30 ft 4.25 in)
  • Wingspan: 17.6 m (57 ft 9 in)
  • Height: 3.9 m (12 ft 9.5 in)
  • Wing area: 52 m2 (559.74 ft2)
  • Empty weight: 748 kg (1649 lb)
  • Gross weight: 1120 kg (2469 lb)
  • Powerplant: 1 × Renault 12-cylinder Vee piston, 101 kW (135 hp) each

Performance

  • Maximum speed: 135 km/h (84 mph)
  • Endurance: 2 hours  20 min
  • Service ceiling: 4,000 m (13,125 ft)

Armament

  • 1 or 2 × 7.7-mm (0.303 in) machine-guns in observer's cockpit
  • light bombs or 10 × Le Prieur rockets

References[edit]

  1. ^ Donald, David, ed. (1997). The Encyclopedia of World Aircraft. Prospero Books. p. 399. ISBN 1-85605-375-X.