John R. Elliott HERO Campaign 300

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John R. Elliott HERO Campaign 300
John R. Elliott HERO Campaign 300 race logo.jpg
Venue Kentucky Speedway
Sponsor Kentucky Transportation Cabinet
First race 2001
Distance 300 miles (482.803 km)
Laps 200
Previous names Outback Steakhouse 300 (2001)
Kroger 300 (2002)
Meijer 300 (2003–2010)
Feed the Children 300 (2011-2013)

The John R. Elliott HERO Campaign 300 presented by Drive Sober or Get Pulled Over is a NASCAR Nationwide Series race held at Kentucky Speedway in Sparta, Kentucky, United States. The distance of the race is 300 miles (482.803 km).

History[edit]

Kentucky Speedway, opened in 2000, by Jerry Carrol. Darrell Waltrip took place to design part of the racetrack. The first Nationwide Series race was held in 2001. Brad Paisley sang the National Anthem, and then Cincinnati Bengals player Corey Dillon gave the command to start engines. This race is notable when Travis Kvapil went upside down after clipping Rich Bickle's 59 car off of Turn 2, and the car slid all the way down the backstrech in the turn three grass. Kevin Harvick won the inaugural event.

Hypermarket chain Meijer was the race's sponsor since 2003 after previous sponsorship from Outback Steakhouse and Kroger. Nabisco, through its Oreo and Ritz brands, had been an associate sponsor since the 2002 race. For 2011, the race is now sponsored by the Nonprofit organization Feed The Children.

David Gilliland, won here in an underfunded team in 2006, with 8 starts in his resume. This win gave him the ride in the 38 car in mid-2006, replacing Elliott Sadler in the 38 car.

Joey Logano is the first repeat winner and did it back to back to back from the pole.

Also, four different drivers have won at Kentucky Speedway to claim their first Nationwide Series win. David Gilliland (2006), Stephen Leicht (2007), Joey Logano (2008), and Austin Dillon (2012).

When Joey Logano won, he became the youngest winner In Nationwide Series history, at 18 years old, 21 days, shattering Casey Atwood's record (18 years, 313 days) that stood since 1999.

Past winners[edit]

Year Date Driver Team Manufacturer Race Distance Race Time Average Speed
(mph)
Laps Miles (km)
2001 June 16 Kevin Harvick Richard Childress Racing Chevrolet 200 300 (482.803) 2:31:47 118.59
2002 June 15/16* Todd Bodine Herzog Motorsports Chevrolet 200 300 (482.803) 2:21:33 127.164
2003 June 14 Bobby Hamilton Jr. Team Rensi Motorsports Ford 200 300 (482.803) 2:12:14 136.123
2004 June 19 Kyle Busch Hendrick Motorsports Chevrolet 200 300 (482.803) 2:22:08 126.642
2005 June 18 Carl Edwards Roush Racing Ford 200 300 (482.803) 2:33:42 117.111
2006 June 17 David Gilliland Clay Andrews Racing Chevrolet 200 300 (482.803) 2:35:10 116.004
2007 June 16 Stephen Leicht Robert Yates Racing Ford 200 300 (482.803) 2:32:56 117.698
2008 June 14 Joey Logano Joe Gibbs Racing Toyota 200 300 (482.803) 2:12:50 135.508
2009 June 13 Joey Logano Joe Gibbs Racing Toyota 200 300 (482.803) 2:20:51 127.796
2010 June 12 Joey Logano Joe Gibbs Racing Toyota 200 300 (482.803) 2:36:08 115.286
2011 July 8 Brad Keselowski Penske Racing Dodge 200 300 (482.803) 2:10.03 138.408
2012 June 29 Austin Dillon Richard Childress Racing Chevrolet 200 300 (482.803) 1:58:42 151.643
2013 June 28 Brad Keselowski Penske Racing Ford 170* 255 (410.382) 1:56:39 131.162
2014 June 27 Kevin Harvick JR Motorsports Chevrolet 200 300 (482.803) 2:15:33 132.792
  • 2002: Race started on Saturday night but was finished on Sunday afternoon due to rain.
  • 2013: Race shortened due to rain.

Multiple winners (drivers)[edit]

# Wins Driver Years Won
3 Joey Logano 2008–2010
2 Brad Keselowski 2011, 2013

Multiple winners (teams)[edit]

# Wins Team Years Won
3 Joe Gibbs Racing 2008–2010
2 Richard Childress Racing 2001, 2012
Penske Racing 2011, 2013

Manufacturer wins[edit]

# Wins Make Years Won
6 United States Chevrolet 2001–2002, 2004, 2006, 2012, 2014
4 United States Ford 2003, 2005, 2007, 2013
3 Japan Toyota 2008–2010
1 United States Dodge 2011

References[edit]

External links[edit]


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John R. Elliott HERO Campaign 300
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