Fifth Military District

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Map of the five Reconstruction military districts, with the Fifth Military District in Orange.

The 5th Military District was a temporary administrative unit of the United States set up during the Reconstruction period following the American Civil War. It included Texas, from Brazos Santiago Harbor, (previously Port Matamoros), at the Mexican border, north to Louisiana. General Philip Sheridan served as its first military governor, until removed by U.S. President Andrew Johnson because of a charge of excessive harshness in Sheridan's treatment of former Confederate soldiers. He was replaced by Charles Griffin, then by Joseph J. Reynolds.

Several incidents committed against negro federal soldiers at Ft. Brown in Brownsville, Texas noted, and elsewhere by Jayhawkers, wild Indians, desperados, etc. Most incident reports fail to identify the perpetrators.

Units[edit]

Among the United States Army forces stationed in Texas were the following units:

1865[edit]

  • August:
    • 30-Brownsville-Pvt Henry Jefferson Co E 19th USCT-accidentally wounded by a comrade-wounded Femeur-On November 17, 1865 patient died during an administration of Chloroform prior to operation to exciding ends of bone {See Surgical Reports.p.&nbsp:272 for report of case}

Summary of reports 1866–1870[edit]

The Following are a summary of U.S. Cavalry/Infantry activities in the 5th Military District of Texas from January 1866 to April 1870 – such as in pursuit of Native Americans and outlaws based on Official Reports and the 6th US Cavalry Regimental History and deaths/injuries to soldiers in the Fifth Military District.

Note: except where noted the following are based on Quarterly Report of November 4, 1868 from Brevet Major General J.J. Reynolds to Secretary of War {pp. 711–716} from "Executive Documents printed by the House of Representatives 1868–1869.

1866[edit]

  • January:
    • 3—Corpus Christi—Pvt Archy David Co C 28th USCT—buried in Corpus Christi {US Army Roll of Honor VI Template:Corpus Christi.p. 35
    • 28—Brownsville Pvt. Gustavas Chase Co I 9th USCT—wounded—died February 4, 1866 {VA records for year of death-Surgical report wrongly gives year as "1867"} (Surgical reports.pp. 22 &  38)
  • March
    • 8—Yorktown-Captain Henry J. Nolan Co K 18th New York Cavalry—wounded {also listed as "Nowlan"} {Annual Report of the Adjutant—general for the State of New York for the year 1895.p. 1267}[1]
  • April:
    • 23—Sgt John O'Brien Co H 18th New York Cavalry-"..killed by Jayhawkers, April 23, 1866, near Kelly's Station, Texas."[2][3] and Sgt Josiah Ripley Co H 18th New York Cavalry-"..murdered by Jayhawkers, while enroute from San Antonio to Yorktown, Texas, veteran"[4]It was thought that both soldiers were killed by a gang headed by "Buck" Taylor [5] of the Sutton–Taylor feud
  • May:
    • 27-Brownsville-Surgeon Joel Morse of the 117th USCT murdered.[6]
  • June:
    • 27-Fort Concho-Pvt Theodore E. Turner-Troop D 4th US Cavalry bitten by a rattlesnake on left thumb; admitted to Post hospital at Austin Texas January 23, 1869-part of thumb amputated-returned to duty January 30, 1869
  • July:
    • 10—Brazos Santiago Pvt S. Wilmares Co G 116th USCT—age 26 years-wound in trunk between ninth and tenth ribs; missile lodged in the intercostal muscles, but was extracted from the wound—Duty September 26, 186{6?} {Surgical report}
  • General Philip Sheridan report of 1866 murders/assaults of US soldiers: See[7]
    • August 29, 1866 Killings Of 2 soldiers of the 80th USCT at Jefferson, Texas {Sheridan report}
    • September 7, 1866 Shootings at 2 soldiers of the US 17th Infantry at Brenham Texas {Sheridan report}
    • October 15, 1866 Sherman-Pvt Jean Shields, Troop D 6th Cavalry-injury-admitted to Post Hospital, Jacksboro-December 13, 1866-amputaion of left arm performed at the middle third; returned to duty January 17, 1867 {Surgical Report .p. 188}
    • December 11, 1866 San Antonio—Pvt William L. Jones, Co F 35th US Infantry—gunshot wound of the abdomen—returned to duty December 22, 1866 {Surgical Report .p. 47}
    • December 17, 1866 Brazos Santiago—Corporal W. Gibbons, Co A 117th USCT—wounded—duty January 27, 1867 {Surgical report}
    • December 18, 1866 Victoria Texas Policeman Silas Newcomb killed by Union Soldier[8]

1867[edit]

  • January:
    • 16th. a colored soldier patrol in Brownsville Texas was fired upon by Brownsville Citizens; patrol returned fire and 2 Brownsville Citizens were killed; patrol had no casualties {Sheridan report}
  • February:
    • 7th. Austin—Corporal Thomas Casey—Co M 6th US Cavalry—gunshot wound of the abdomen; admitted from camp to regimental field hospital; died February 8, 1867 {Surgical Report.p. 46}
    • 9th. Austin—Pvt Michael O'Callaghan—Co D 6th US Cavalry—shot by a citizen—admitted to hospital February 10; died February 11, 1867 {Surgical Report. According to House of Representatives documents Callaghan was shot by Charles Denny and William Sherwood}
    • 26th. Brenham—Corporal H. Reinhold—Co H US 17th Infantry—gunshot wound; duty May 16, 1867 {Surgical report.p. 69}
  • March:
    • 1st. Fayette County—1st Lt Howe and command on parade—Jesse Pullen shot at Howe and command with a pistol {HOuse of Representative document}
    • 16th. Galveston County—Joseph Huson and 2 other soldiers of the US 17th Infantry murdered a colored man named Daniel Parker {House of representatives Document}
  • April:
    • 3rd. Brazos Santiago—Pvt A. Newell Co A 114th USCT—age 42 years-pistol wound over the ensiform appendix. Missile passed upward and loged upward one ich to the left of the right nipple. Removeal of ball through incision. Returned to duty April 14, 1867 {Surgical report}
    • 15th.Travis County—Soldier of the US 9th Cavalry found murdered—his arms {weapons} had been taken away {house of representatives document}
  • June:
    • 2nd. Travis County—Henry Frazer of the US 6th Cavalry killed by Ozweir Wilcox because Frazier "...was a United States Soldier." {House of Representatives document}
    • 5th Lavaca County—James Hanlan {soldier} shot at by a man named Hicks {Hanlan escaped} {House of Representatives document}
    • 11th Fort Belknap—Pvt F.Schwindig—Co I 6th US Cavalry—wounded by bullet—died June 12, 1867 {Surgical Report.p. 20}
  • July:
    • 19th Young County—Johnson and 2 others {names unknown} killed by Indians {HOuse of Representative documents}
    • 21st {US 6th Cavalry} "Parts of the regiment were engaged with Indians at Buffalo Springs". See 6th Cavalry Regimental History at The United States Army Center of Military History
    • 23rd Polk County—James McGowan {soldier} assault with intent to kill H.H. Goddin {white} "Soldier Drunk" {House of representatives documents}
    • 25th Bowis County-Private Albert Titus of Co C 20th US Infantry killed at New Boston Texas by outlaw Cullen Baker
    • 28th Young County—William Henzelwood killed by Indians {House of Representative documents}
    • 31st Anderson County—John Boises {Soldier} killed a desperato named william Miliam who had drawn a pistol and knife on Freeman Bureau Agent and then on Boises {House of Representatives documents}
  • August:
    • 3rd. Private George Coleman. Co G 117th USCI, accidentally wounded—admitted to Brazos Santiago from Brownsville August 11, 1867; discharged from service August 14, 1867 {Surgical Report .p. 74}
    • 6th Private David White—Co G 41st Infantry—accidentally wounded in arm by a rifle—Ringgold Barracks Texas; arm amputated September 6, 1867; patient died September 9, 1867 {Surgucal Report}
    • 15th. Smith County—Thomas {Ha{?}wley {soldier}—assaulted by J.H. Murray with deadly weapon with intent to kill {House of Representative document}
    • 26th. Private Franklin Grey, Co F 41st USCI, accidentally wounded—Brownsville. Transferred to Fort Concho March 20 and discharged for disability October 18, 1869. {Surgical Report .pp. 18–19}
    • 29th. Ft Belknap. Corporal Thomas O'Brien-Troop F 6th Cavalry-slight arrow wound of chest-treated at Fort Wilson-returned to duty-Sept 5, 1867 {Surgical Report .p. 158}
    • 29th. Ft Belknap. Private William Rosback-Troop F 6th Cavalry-arrow wounds of scalp and leg-treated at Fort Wilson-returned to duty-Nov 24, 1867 {Surgical Report .p. 149}
    • 30th. Lt. Gustavus Schreyer with Troop F 6th US Cavalry encountered a band of Indians near Fort Belknap; 2 men killed. {From 6th US Cavalry History "From Yorktown to Santiago" .p. 138}
    • 31st to October 2. 2nd Lt. G. A. Thurston 4th Cavalry from Fort Chadbourne, Texas with Co D 4th Cavalry. 1 Officer/42 men. Passed through Rio Concho & Pecos. Traveled 354 miles to operate against Comanche. "No Indians seen."
  • September:
    • {No day} Bowie County—Davis {soldier} US 6th Cavalry—assaulted with intent to kill by John M. Sullivan {HOuse of representative documents}
    • 1st—Pvt Jerry Hewes—Co A 9th Colored Troops—wounded in right hand—admitted to Ft Sockton Hospital—died September 15, 1867 {Surgical Reports}
    • 6th-Pvt David White-Co D 41st Infantry-accidentally wounded by a rifle-compound complicated fracture of radius, ulma and humerus of one arm-admitted to Ringgold Barracks Hospital-arm amputated September 6, 1867-died September 9, 1867 {See report of Surgical Report .p. 188}
    • 20th—Sgt John Cappings—Co H 26th Infantry—wound in right hip from Musket ball—moved from Waco hosp to Austin Hosp. March 20, 1868. Returned to duty May 1, 1868 {Surgical report}; Lt. Gustavus Schreyer-Troop F 6th US Cavalry-accidental wound-slight arrow wound in left thigh-treated at Camp Wilson and returned to duty October 22, 1867 {Surgical Report .p. 158}
    • 25th to October 6. Sgt John De Lacy 4th Cavalry from Fort Chadbourne, Texas with Co D 4th Cavalry. 14 men. Passed through Rio Condo & Pecos. Traveled 258 miles to operate against Comanche. "No Indians seen."
    • 30th to October 28. 1st Lt. James Callehan 4th Cavalry from Ft. Chadbourne, Tx. Troops from 4th Cavalry {Co H} 1 Officer/45 men. Passed through country through Rio Concho and Pecos. Traveled a distance of 632 miles to operate against the Comanche. Some signs seen.
  • October:
    • 8th to 12th. 1st Lt. E. Manck 6th Cavalry from Buffalo Springs, Texas. Troops of 6th Cavalry 1 Officer/25 men & 1 citizen. Passed through Montague and Clay Counties. Traveled 120 miles to operate against Comanche."No Indians seen."
    • 10th to 20th. Sgt John Sugden 4th Cavalry from Fort Clark Texas with Co C 4th Cavalry. 18 men. Passed though country along Nueces River. Traveled 200 miles to operate against Comanche. "No Indians seen."
    • 13th to 19th. Sgt W. A. F. Ahrberg of Troop L from Camp Wilson Texas with troops of 6th Cavalry 45 men and 22 Indians. Encounter with Comanche; 3 Indians killed, 1 captured. 19 horses/1 mule/2 revolvers recovered. Remains of 5 citizens killed by Indians buried. {According to 6th Cavalry History, Ahrberg and his detachment were commended in General Orders # 40 of November 21, 1867 by Major General J.J. Reynolds {.p. 138} {Possibly mentioned in 6th Cavalry History as Parts of the regiment were engaged with Indians ....in the field, October 17, 1867;...".}
    • 17th. Private Joseph Shaw of Co D, 3rd US Cavalry wounded in a fight with Indians in right tibia. Admitted to Fort Bliss and Camp Concorida, Texas October 25, 1867; bone excised Feb 2, 1868. Shaw returned to duty March 9, 1868. {"A report of Surgical Cases in the Army".p. 82}
    • 18th. Sierra Diabola. Troop D/3rd Cavalry[9] Fight with Miscallaro Apaches.Private Frank Burr wounded by arrow in right forearm-returned to duty: Pvt James Daily-flesh wound in right thigh-treated at Fort Bliss-returned to duty October 26, 1867; Pvt Clarence G. Morrell-arrows wounds to right side;groin and back-treated at Ft Bliss-returned to duty November 19, 1867; Private Francis Stall-arrow wound to the right breast-returned to duty{Surgical report .pp. 157–159}
  • November:
    • 8th to 12th. 1st Lt. E. Manck 6th Cavalry from Buffalo Springs, Texas. Troops from the 6th Cavalry 1 officer/25 men and 1 citizen. Passed through Montague and Clay Counties; traveled 120 miles to operate against Comanche."No Indians seen."
    • 14th. Mason County Texas—1 officer {Major John A Thompson} and 1 NCO {Sgt John McDougall} of 4th Cavalry killed by Taylor gang {Surgical report}{HOuse of Representative document names killers as Hays Taylor ; P.G. Taylor and "Spencer"}.[10]
  • December:
    • 3rd—Jefferson. Pvt Fontanice Singleton—Co D 20th Infantry—cut his foot with an axe—returned to duty—December 11, 1867 {Surgical Report.p. 99}
    • 5th—affray at Franklin Texas—Pvt J. Kimball—Co A 35th US Infantry—died from pistol shot wound {surgical Report}
    • 19th to 23rd. 2nd Lt. G.A. Thurston 4th Cavalry from Rio Concho, Tex. Troops from 4th Cavalry {Cos. D, G,H, M}. 1 officer/22 men. Passed through country through main Concho River. Traveled 130 miles against Kickapoo Indians. Some signs seen.
    • 22nd Mason County—Thomas Darnell; William Truman; John Ketchum; James Ketchum; Robert Cromwell/Company—killed while returning from New Mexico. Killed either by Indians or Mexicans in San Saba County {House of Representative Documents}.Remains found by a patrol of the 10th U.S. Cavalry[11]
    • 27th Brownsville—Corporal J. Pilot—Co L 9th US cavalry—wounded by a Sgt—returned to duty February 1868 {Surgical report}

1868[edit]

January:

  • ?—date not given—Titis County—Mount Pleasant—US Quartermaster robbed—safe and money stolen.
  • 2nd—Indianola—Pvt C. Lehmann Co B 35th US Infantry—gunshot wound—died January 3, 1868 {Surgical Report}
  • 3rd to 5th 1st Lt. G. Schreyer 6th Cavalry from Ft Griffin Tex. Troops from 6th Cavalry {Cos F, I,L, K} 1 officer/20 men. Passed through Shackelford County; traveled 50 miles to operate against Comanche."No Indians seen."
  • 4th to 7th. Sgt W. Stewart 4th Cavalry from Camp Verde, Texas. Troops from 4th Cavalry {Cos B & L}. 13 men. Passed through country through Medina river. Traveled 80 miles to operate against the Kickapoo."No Indians seen."
  • 4th to 5th. 2nd Lt. D.C. McIntyre 6th Cavalry from Ft Griffin Texas. Troops from 6th Cavalry {Cos. F, I,K, L}. Passed through Shackelford County; traveled a distance of 36 miles against the Comanche."No Indians seen."
  • 6th to 9th. Sgt. G. E. Mansfield from Ft Clark Texas. Troops from 4th Cavalry Co C. 12 men. Passed through Sycamore & Los Moras Creek. Traveled a distance of 120 miles to operate against the Comanche. "No Indians seen."
  • 9th—Bronsville Texas—Pvt John Gray—Co D—26th US Infantry—shot in heart with a small pistol ball—survived but a short time {Surgical Report}
  • 31st—Fort Davis—Pvt Jeremiah Daniels—Co I 9th US Cavalry—accidentally wounded—died {Surgical report}
  • In an appendix to 1869 Report of General of the Army (p. 55) is reported: January 1869 Northern Texas—Killed 25; scalped 9 {white people}

February:

  • 1st Bexas County—US Soldier assaulted with intent to kill by a Mr Aldretto {House of Representatives document}
  • 4th Fort Concho—Pvt W. Leech—Co H 4th US Cavalry—accidental wound—died February 6, 1868 {Surgical report}
  • 4th to 6th. 2nd Lt. O. Grosvenor 4th Cavalry from Camp Verde, Texas, Troops from 4th Cavalry {Cos B & L} 1 officer/18 men. Passed through country along Rio Guadalupe. Traveled a distance of 90 miles against the Kickapoo Indians."No Indians seen."
  • 6th to 10th. 2nd Lt J. M. Walton 4th Cavalry from Camp Verde, Texas. Troops from 4th Cavalry {Cos B & L} 1 officer/26 men. Passed through Medina river. Traveled a distance of 120 miles to operate against Kickapoo Indians."No Indians seen."
  • 7th to 9th. Corporal J. Mauley 4th Cavalry from Camp Verde, Texas. Troops from 4th Cavalry {Cos. B & L} 6 men. Passed through Guadalupe and Ferdinales rivers; traveled a distance of 80 miles to operate against the Kickapoo Indians."No Indians seen."
  • 22nd—75 miles northwest of Fort Concho—unknown Mexican killed in Indian fight by an arrow wound {Surgical report p. 148}
  • In an appendix to 1869 Report of General of the Army (p. 55) is reported: February 1869 Northern Texas—Killed 7; 5 children captured of whom 2 were given up and 3 taken to Kansas {white People}; 50 horses taken and 3 houses burned

March:

  • 1st to 4th. 1st Lt. William J. Maberly 4th Cavalry from Camp Verde Texas. Troops from 4th Cavalry {Cos B & L} 1 officer/17 men. passed through country Rio Pecos and Rio Hondu; traveled a distance of 125 miles to operate against Kickapoo Indians. Abundant signs seen.
  • 2nd to 4th. 2nd Lt. H.F. Winchester from Ft Griffin Texas. Troops from 6th Cavalry {Cos F, I.L.K} 2 officer/19 men. Passed through Shackelford County, traveled 48 miles to operate against Comanche."No Indians seen."
  • 5th to 9th. Captain A.R. Chaffee 6th Cavalry from Fort Griffin, Texas. Troops from 6th Cavalry {Cos F, I} 4 Officers/62 men and 7 Indians. Against Comanche Indians 130 miles through Haskel and Jones Counties. "Indians killed, 7; property captured, 2 horses, 2 ponies, 1 mule, with shields, bows and arrows, and all saddle equipments of the party; enlisted men wounded, 3. Privates Ryan, company F, Hoffman, company I, and Butler, company I, 6th Cavalry, were wounded." 5 Indians, 1 Mexican and 1 mulatto were killed[12] Mentioned in US 6th Cavalry History as "Parts of the regiment were engaged with Indians ....at Paint Creek, Texas, March 5, 1868." US Casualties- 6th Cavalry-Troop F: Pvt James Ryan-arrow wound of lip-treated at Fort Griffin Texas and returned to duty March 11, 1868; Troop I:Pvt John Butler-arrow wound of Upper left arm; returned to duty March 11, 1868. {Surgical Report pp. 157–158}
  • 7th to 10th. Corporal C. Henhold 6th Cavalry from Sherman Tx. Troops from 6th Cavalry {Co D} 13 men and 7 citizens. Passed through Collins, Hunt, and Grayson Counties. Traveled against Lee's band of thieves & outlaws in Read Creek Swamp, Collins County. "Indians killed,2; prisoners, 5,(men)". {Note for account of 2nd involvement on March 29, 1869 involvement of the US 6th Cavalry in the Lee-Peacock feud. See Below}
  • 7th to 14th. 1st Lt. J.F. Hill 6th Cavalry from Ft Richardson Texas. Troops from 6th Cavalry {Cos A, C,D, E} 1 officer/20 men & 3 Indians. Passed through Jack and Clay Counties against Comanche for 150 miles."No Indians seen."
  • 10th to 11th. Sgt C. Gale 4th Cavalry from Ft Concho Texas. Troops from 4th Cavalry {Co D} 6 men. Passed through Rio Colorado; traveled 120 miles to operate against the Comanche. "Indians killed, 1; property captured, 10 horses."
  • 14th Austin Texas—Pvt J. MacDonough—Co B 6th US Cavalry—shot by a Corporal—{killed} {Surgical Report}
  • 15th to 24th. 2nd Lt. A. W. Bothwick 6th Cavalry from Ft Richardson Tex. Troops from 6th Cavalry {Cos A, C,D, E} 1 officer/20 men & 3 Indians. Passed through Jack & Clay Counties against Comanche. Distance not stated. "No Indians seen."
  • 20th to 21st. 2nd Lt. G. E. Overton 6th Cavalry from Buffalo Springs, Texas. Troops from 6th Cavalry {Cos A, C,D, E} 1 officer/20 men & 1 citizen. Passed through Clay County 50 miles against the Comanche."No Indians seen."
  • 30th to 31st. Corp. T. Williams 6th cavalry from Buffalo Springs. Texas. Troops from 6th Cavalry (Co D) 5 men. Passed through Clay County. Distance not stated.

April:

  • 1st. Austin. Pvt. William Burke. Co B 6th Cavalry. Wound in the abdomen—died {Surgical Report p. 46}
  • 8th to 20th. 1st Lt. J.B. Cole 4th Cavalry from Laredo Texas. Troops from 4th Cavalry {Co C} 1 officer/25 men. Passed through country between Laredo and Eagle Pass. Traveled 250 miles. {Report apparently gives wrong date of departure as 1867}.

May:

  • 2nd. San Antonio. Sgt Washington Coler. Co C, 26th US Cavalry, wounded. Returned to duty May 25, 1868. {Surgical report p. 18}
  • 3rd to 14th. Capt F.S. Hodge of 9th Cavalry from Fort Stockton. Troops from 9th Cavalry {Cos A, B,D, E} 1 officer/29 men Passed through Texas 350 miles.
  • 3rd to 14th. 1st Lt. E. Eauck 6th Cavalry from Ft Richardson Texas. Troops from 6th Cavalry {Cos A, C,D, E,F, H,M} 2 offices/66 men & 2 citizens. Passed through Texas, traveled 212 miles to operate against Comanche."No Indians seen."
  • 3rd to 17th. Captain D. Madden 6th Cavalry from Ft Richardson Texas. Troops from 6th Cavalry {Cos A, D,E, H} 2 officers/44 men and 2 citizens. Traveled a distance of 267 miles to operate against the Comanche."No Indians seen."
  • 5th. Private Charles Wicks, Co C 26th US Inf. Wounded by a Mexican Brownsville Texas. Returned to duty June 12, 1868. {Surgical report pp. 17–18}
  • 15th to 15th. 1st Lt. T. J. Wint 4th Cavalry from Fort Concho Texas. Troops from 4th Cavalry {Cos. D, H, M} 1 officer/33 men & 1 citizen. Passed through country along South Concho. Traveled 14 miles to operate against Comanche."No Indians seen."
  • 19th to 24th. Captain H. Carroll 9th Cavalry from Fort Quitman Texas. Troops from 9th Cavalry Cos F/H/I. 1 Officer/30 men. Passed through Texas. Traveled 170 miles.
  • In an appendix to 1869 Report of General of the Army (p. 55) is reported: May 1869 Northern Texas—Killed 0 {white people}

June:

  • 2nd to July 2. 1st Lt. T. M. Tolman 6th Cavalry from Fort Richardson Tex. Troops from 6th Cavalry 4 officers/92 men. Passed through Texas {distance not stated} to operate against Comanche."No Indians seen."
  • 3rd to 4th. Corporal J. Conover 4th Cavalry from Laredo Tex. Troops from 4th Cavalry {Co C}. 7 men. Passed through Laredo to San Ignacio. Traveled 245 miles.
  • 6th. Fort Concho. Pvt. John Gourjan. Co G 4th US Cavalry—accidentally wounded while on picket—admitted to hospital June 7, 1868; died June 8, 1868 {Surgical Report p. 46}
  • 7th to 8th. Sgt. C. Rodamore 4th Cavalry from Ft Concho Tex. Troops from 4th Cavalry {Cos. D, H, M}. 13 men & 1 citizen. Passed through headwaters of the Concho 50 miles to operate against the Comanche. "No Indians seen."
  • 15th to July 6. 2nd Lt. H. P. Eakin 6th Cavalry from Fort Richardson Texas. Troops from 6th Cavalry 1 officer/21 men. Passed through Texas {distance not stated} to operate against murderers. {Murderers not found}.
  • 17th to July 17. 1st Lt. J. F. Hill 6th Cavalry from Fort Richardson Texas. Troops from 6th Cavalry 1 officer/20 men. Passed through Texas {distance not stated} to operate against murderers. {Murderers not found}.
  • 18th to 30th. 1st Lt. A Krammer 6th Cavalry from Ft Griffin Texas. Troops from 6th Cavalry {Cos. I, K,L} 3 officers/15 men and 15 Indians & 1 citizen. Traveled a distance of 240 miles to operate against the Tonkawas & Comanche."No Indians seen."
  • 19th to 22nd. Captain G. H. Gamble 9th Cavalry from Fort Stockton Tex. from 9th Cavalry Cos A/B/D/E. 1 Officer/22 men. Passed through Texas. Traveled 100 miles.
  • 29th. Fort Clark. Pvt George Grey, Troop M 9th Cavalry—accidentally wounded by a sponge—staff while firing National Salute; both forearms amputated; suffered tetanus July 11 and died July 15, 1868 {Surgical report pp. 176–177}
  • In an appendix to 1869 Report of General of the Army (p. 55) is reported: June 1869 Northern Texas—Killed 1; {white people}

July:

  • 4th. Fort Stockton. Pvt Isam Davis Co D 9th US Cavalry -mortally wounded {quarrel}—died July 21, 1868 {Surgical report p. 53}
  • 10th to August 11. 2nd Lt G. E. Overton 6th Cavalry from Fort Richardson Texas. Troops from 6th Cavalry 1 officer/15 men. Passed through Texas {distance not stated} to operate against murderers. {Murderers not found}.
  • In an appendix to 1869 Report of General of the Army (p. 55) is reported: July 1869 Brazos River Texas—Killed 4; scalped 9 {white people}

August:

  • 12th. Brenham—Pvt J.W. McClinchey Co E 17th Infantry—head and side wounds with a knife; admitted to post hospital August 12; returned to duty September 26, 1868 {Surgical report p. 90}
  • 14th. Fort Richardson-"Sergt Edward Gregory with a detail of seven enlisted men accompanied by a Freedman as guide was sent about four miles from the Post on the evening of 14th August and while returning about dark the same evening were ambushed by a party of desperadoes and fired upon within a mile of the Post. Sergt Edward Gregory (may be Greevy), Private John Miller and three Freedman were killed, one horse was killed and four wounded." {From Muster Roll Co H 6th Regt of US Cavalry 30 Jun 1868—31 Aug 1868 {US National Archives}
  • 17th to 21st. Captain D. Madden 6th Cavalry from Fort Richardson Texas. Troops from 6th Cavalry. 1 officer/10 men. Passed through Texas to operate against desperadoes {distance not stated}. No desperadoes found
  • 20th. Fort Stockton—Pvt Taliaferro Hall—Co E 9th Cavalry—accidentally wounded in left foot—returned to duty October 4, 1868 {Surgical Report p. 84}
  • 23rd. "Northern Texas" 8 Murdered {white people} and 300 livestock stolen {P.53 1869 Report of General of the Army}
  • 23rd. Austin—Pvt Bernard Curry and Pvt D. O'Conner—Co B 6th United States Cavalry—gunshot wound of the abdomen—died in Post Hospital Austin Texas {Surgical Report p. 44 & p. 52}
  • 24th to 28th. 2nd Lt. J.M. Burns 17th Infantry from Fort Richardson Texas. Troops from 6th Cavalry 1 officer/5 men. Passed through Texas {distance not stated] to operate against desperadoes. No desperadoes found.
  • 28th to September 3. Capt. D. Madden 6th Cavalry from Fort Richardson Tex. Troops from 6th Cavalry. 2 officers/50 men. Passed through Texas {distance not stated] to operate against Comanche."No Indians seen."

September:

  • 1st. "Spanish Fort Texas" 4 Murdered; 8 Scalped; 3 women outraged {of whom one was killed along with her 4 children} {White People} 15 horses taken {P.53 1869 Report of General of the Army}
  • 2nd. "H Company, 6th US Cavalry have been for sometime engaged in breaking up and riddling the surrounding counties of these bands of desperadoes by which they have been infected and also for the protection of Union men and Freedmen. On the 2nd of Sept Lts. Schreyer and Gordon 'C'W/Cavi? with a detail consisting of 1 Sgt, 1 Bugler and 15 Pvts of Co H, 6th US Cavalry were engaged with a party of these men capturing their horses and arms. Bugler Connelly was shot sided during the engagement." {Muster Roll Co H 6th Regiment Cavalry 31st day of Aug 1866 to 31st Day of October 1868. Michail Connelly Bryler entered 5 Apr 1866 at New York for 3 years wounded in action by desperadoes 2 September 1868. {US National Archives}
  • 5th to 9th. 1st Lt. H. E. Scott 6th Cavalry from Fort Richardson Tex. Troops from 6th Cavalry (Cos I, K,L) 2 Officers/50 men & 2 Indians. Passed through Texas. Traveled 136 miles to operate against Comanches. {*}
  • 8th—Pvt Frank Castle—Co C 41st Infantry—Fort Clark Texas—wounded in the left hand while in a brawl with other enlisted men—November 3, 1868—patient returned to duty {Surgical duty}
  • 8th to 23rd. 1st Lt. P. Cusak 9th Cavalry from Fort Davis, Texas. Troops from 9th Cavalry 1 officer/60 men and 10 citizens. Passed through country east of Ft. Davis—traveled 180 miles. Operated against Meskaleros and Inlanos. 3 enlisted men wounded: Privates G. Collyer {Co F}; Lewis White {Co C}; John Foster {Co K}. 25 Indians killed and 25 wounded. 1 Mexican boy captured. 198 animals captured. {Horse head Hills-Private Louis White-Troop C-9th Cavalry-arrow wound of 6th rib left side; treated at Ft Davis and returned to duty September 26, 1868 {Surgical Report.p. 159} Pvt. John Foster-Troop F-9th Cavalry-wounded by a lance-returned to duty-September 18, 1868 {Surgical Report p. 102} Pvt. Gilbert Colyer-Troop F-9th Cavalry-wounded by a lance-returned to duty-Oct 1868 {Surgical Report p. 102}
  • "Sept 16th Lt. Schreyer with 1 Sgt, 4 corporals and 15 privates were sent in pursuit of another band capturing 1 prisoner and their horse and arms." {Muster Roll Co H 6th US Cavalry 31st day of August 1866 to 31st day of October 1868. {US National Archives.}
  • 22nd to 23rd. 1st Lt. H. S. Howe 17th Infantry from Austin Texas. Troops from 6th Cavalry 1 officer/7 men. Passed through Travis County Texas. Traveled 14 miles. Operated against citizens. Two enlisted men killed: Privates D. O'Conner and B. Curry {Co B}. killed by John McGuire {Citizen} arrested. {A report of Curry and O'Conner wounds and deaths in Austin are in Surgical Report p. 44 and p. 52 in which it is reported that Curry and O'Conner died of wounds August 23, 1868 at Post Hospital at Austin Texas}

October:

  • 4 October—Murder of Honorable G.W. Smith {delegate to Constitutional Convention} and two freemen and reported wounding of a freeman by Ku Klux Klan-report of Captain James Curtis of US 15th Infantry forwarded by General Reynolds who also reports arrest of 35 men who participated in murder; General Don Carlos Buell in Jefferson Texas reported May 5, 1869 of C.L. Pitcher Confined since February 9, 1869 as being involved in Smith murder {Senate Document Report of Alleged outrages .p. LII}
  • 7 October--New Boston, Texas Freeman Bureau Agent William C. Kirkham killed[13]
  • "Oct 18th Lt Schreyer with 3 corporals and 15 privates were sent in pursuit of Ben Bickerstaff?/the desperado/and succeeded in capturing prisoners and also a lot of horses and arms." {Muster Roll Co H 6th US Cavalry 31st day of August 1866 to 31st day of October 1868. {US National Archives}

October–December:

  • {US 6th Cavalry} "One troop marched more than a thousand miles in pursuit of outlaws during the last three months of 1868". {See [5] at the United States Army Center of Military History}
  • 24 October "1864"{? 1868}—Fort Stockton—Pvt Peter Alfonze—Co A 9th US Cavalry—flesh wound from bullet—duty November 1, 1868 {Surgical Report}
  • 29 October—Belton—Pvt John Eberhardt—Co A 17th US Infantry—shot while a party of eight men were attempting to arrest a desperado, "..a ball from a Colt's Navy revolver entered the right thigh... patient died in about two hours from hemorrhage." {Surgical report p. 86}
  • ?? October—Fort Quitman—Pvt George W. Young—Co H 9th US Cavalry—flesh wound from bullet—duty November 10, 1868 {Surgical report}
  • 6 November—Fort Quitman—Pvt Henry Hight—Troop H 9th US Cavalry—gunshot flesh wound of right foot—duty January 1869 {Surgical report p. 85}
  • 19 November {Farmersville, Texas—20 miles from Pilot Grove} Pvt J. Hoffman—Co A 6th US Cavalry—wounded in a skirmish—died November 20, 1868 {Surgical Report}
  • 20 November—Galveston—Corporal Frank Sachse—Co F 17th US infantry—lacerated wound—returned to duty—November 29, 1868 {Surgical Report p. 235}
  • 18 December-Pvt William Neff—Co B 9th Cavalry—admitted to Fort Stockton hospital with a gunshot wound of both thighs—died {Surgical Report p. 85.-not dated but date of death is from VA records}
  • 24 December Sulper Springs—Pvt T Quigley—Co G 17th US Infantry—incised wound of shoulder—returned to duty February 1869 {Surgical report}
  • 25 December {Junction of Salt Fork and Elm Creek Texas} Col A. W. Evans commanded 446 {Strength} against 300 Comanches and Kiowas; 3 enlisted men wounded; 25 Indians killed/35 Indians wounded. {1869 Report to the Secretary of War p. 52}
  • 25 December Fort Brenham—Corporal Allan Davis—Co B 17th US Infantry—wounded by a round ball—admitted to Fort Brenham Hospital December 26, 1868; died December 28, 1868 {Surgical report p. 52}

1869[edit]

  • In a table of organization in 1869 Report to Secretary of War J.J. Reynolds commanded 3 cavalry {4th; 6th;9th} and 3 Infantry {10th;11;24th} {P. 35} In his Official report of October 21, 1869 Reynolds reported that Indian raids resulted in heavy damage to citizens and livestock but that the loss of life has been small, amounting during the year to about "twenty—six". {p. 144}; likewise in enforcing indictments for murder there were several persons who resisted arrest with force of arms and were killed {.p. 144} and that Military commissions—under authority of Congress March 2, 1867—had from October 1, 1868 to September 30, 1869 tried 59 cases, of which 21 were convicted and 38 acquitted. {Ibid.p. 145}
  • March:
    • 4th Jefferson Texas—Pvt W.R. Stone—Co F 4th US Cavalry—accidental gunshot wounded—died {Surgical Report}
    • 14th Fort Griffin—John J. Baron {citizen} wounded—died March 18, 1869 Fort Griffin Hospital {Surgical report}
    • 18th Fort Richardson—Pvt G. Lorenzo—Co F 6th US Cavalry—age 21-pistol wound of back—duty May 12, 1869 {Surgical report}
    • 25th Galveston—Pvt Daniel McCarthy—Co D 24th US Infantry—gunshot wound; returned to duty April 1869 {Surgical Report.p. 47}
    • 29th Involvement of both the U.S. 4th Cavalry Regiment & of U.S. 6th Cavalry Regiment in the "Lee-Peacock feud"-see reference at Archived October 23, 2009 at the Wayback Machine in which a soldier was injured and a Texas Deputy Sheriff William C. Hall was killed {for reference only}; for fallen lawman see [6]. {The same day in Austin a citizen prisoner John Glascock accidentally shot himself in the knee while arrest; discharged from post hospital October 17, 1869 {Report of Surgical Cases in the Army .p. 80}
  • May:
    • 7th Jefferson Texas—Pvt W. Christian—Co D 11th US Infantry—accidental gunshot wounded—duty May 10, 1869 {Surgical report}
    • 7th Livingston Texas—Sgt J.F. Leonard—Co B 6th US Cavalry—age 29-gunshot wound of thoracic parities—duty June 16, 1869 {Surgical report} {Possibly shot by either John Wesley Hardin or his cousin "Simp" Dixon?}
    • 9th San Antonio—Pvt Richard Elliott—Co H 9th US Cavalry—knife wound in left breast; discharged from service March 24, 1870 {Surgical report.p. 249}
  • June:
    • 28th—Fort Stockton—Pvt Henry Johnson—Co E 9th Colored Cavalry—gunshot wound left hip—into Fort Concho post hospital—returned to duty—August 18, 1869 {Surgical Report .p. 76}
    • 28th—Fort Concho—Pvt James Fester—Co F, 41st infantry—gunshot wound left thigh {Scuffle with comrade—Fort Concho Post hospital—died July 16, 1869 {Surgical Report .p. 76}
    • 29th—Fort Jefferson—Pvt George Scott—Co M, 3rd Artillery—compound fracture of the right leg; discharged from service March 5, 1870 {Surgical Report.p. 138}
  • September:
    • 6th—Fort Quitman—Pvt O. Larssen—Co A 35th US Infantry—wounded in a disturbance with Mexicans—returned to duty Nov 20, 1869 {Surgical Report}
    • 17th—Fort Richardson—Pvt J Osborne—Co I 24th US Infantry—wounded in a fracus outside garrison—died September 18, 1869 {Surgical Report}
    • 19th-San Antonio-Artificer Thomas Dardis-Co F 10th Infantry-stabbed by a comrade with a jack-knife-died of wound {Surgichal Report.p. 91}
  • October:
    • 15th Fort Richardson—Sgt Frank Tocker—Co D 6th US Cavalry—found dead of gunshot wound in head on road to Govt saw—mill at Hogs Eye Texas {Surgical Report}
    • 19th Fort Quitman—Pvt W. Herron—Co F 38th US Infantry—gunshot wound in breast—duty November 30, 1869 (Surgical report)
    • 28th-Brazos River-1st Lt. George E. Albee of the 41st US Infantry and 2 men attacked and drove off 11 Indians and reconnoitered county beyond-Albee received Medal of Honor
  • November:
    • 26th Helena Texas-Pvt. john Carey-Co G 10th US Infantry-wounded in a quarrel by a pocket knife-dressing applied at Post Hospital at Helena-returned to duty January 16, 1870 {Surgical report.p. 102}
  • December:
    • 22nd Fort MacKavitt—Captain F.W. Smith—9th US Cavalry killed by accidental discharge of pistol {Surgical Report}
    • 24th Ringgold Battacks—1st Sgt Daniel Isaacs—Co I 10th Infantry—contusion on head—admitted to base hospital—died same day {Surgical Report .p. 121}
    • 29th Fort Duncan,-Pvt Horance Williams-age 20 years-Troop L 9th US Cavalry-accidentally wounded while ramming a blank charge in artillery for a salute-forearm amputated-discharged from service April 30, 1870 {Surgical report}
    • 31st Jefferson—Lt E.P.Kolby—11th US Infantry—suicide {Surgical report}

1870[edit]

  • January:
    • 16th—Fort Quitman—Pvt W. Weaver—Co H 9th US Cavalry—wounded by pistol balls—recovered {Surgical Report}
    • 23rd—Fort Griffin—Pvt Jackson Tolliver—Co E 24th USCI—two gunshot wounds—died of wound {Surgical Report.p. 41}
  • February:
    • 2nd—Five miles from Menardville—thirtyfive miles below Fort McKavitt—Corporal Albert Marshall—Co F 9th US Cavalry—murdered by desperadoes while guarding a prisoner {Surgical Report .p. 35}
    • 3rd—Fort McKavitt—Private Charles Murray—Co F 9th US Cavalry—murdered by ruffians while guarding a prisoner {Jackson} accused of murder. {Surgical Report .p. 46}
    • 7th—Fort McIntosh—Pvt George C. Hubbell—Troop C 4th Cavalry—accidentally wounded by shot from his carbine; left forearms amputated. Discharged May 12, 1870 {Surgical Report .p. 177}
    • 20th—Fort Duncan—Pvt Thomas Baker—Co K 24th Infantry—accidentally wounded—died February 21, 1870 {Surgical Report.p. 46}
    • {?}-Limestone County- Outlaw "Simp" Dixon killed by Soldiers under command of Sgt Adam Desch[14]
  • March:
    • 5th—Waco—Pvt John Harkey—Co E 6th US Cavalry—fell from second story building used as barracks—died March 7, 1870 {Surgical Report}
    • 16th—Fort Davis—Pvt D. Boyd—Co K 9th US Cavalry—accidentally killed {Surgical Report}
    • 19th—Fort Bliss—Pvt T.H.Whipper—Co A 24th Infantry—accidentally wounded—returned to duty May 16, 1870 {Surgical report}
    • 21st—Fort Clark—Pvt N Pochet—Co G 9th US Cavalry—wounded in a brawl {carbine ball}—died {Surgical report}
    • 25th—North Ilano—Pvt. Williams—Co D 24th Infantry—accidentally wounded—taken to McKavitt hospital next day—died April 2, 1870 {Surgical Report .pp. 78–79}
  • May:
  • June:
    • 19th—Fort Concho—Pvt Edward Staven—Co G 4th US Cavalry—accidentally wounded in a drunken scuffle—died {Surgical Report.p. 43}
  • July:
    • 4th-Fort Bliss-Pvt Doctor Johnson-Co A 24th US Infantry-accidentally suffered amputation of left hand due to a discharge of a cannon-discharged April 30, 1871 {Surgical Report.p. 177}
    • 4th-San Antonio-Pvt George Deems-Troop A 4th US Cavalry- admitted to hospital-contused wound of scalp {accident}-discharged August 9, 1870 {Surgical Report.p.  272}
    • 12th—Little Wichita River-53 men of the 6th US Cavalry and 2 officers and an assistant Surgeon under Captain C.B. McClelland in battle with 250 Kiowas under Chief Kicking Bird; US casualties were two killed and 9 wounded; Kiowa losses were reported to be 15 killed and many wounded.[15] Corporal John Conner of Company H wounded-returned to duty September 12, 1870; Private Samuel Wagner of Company A wounded-returned to duty August 3, 1870; Private William Gallagher of Company D-wounded-duty August 1870; Private Benjamin Amey of Company H-wounded-duty July 18, 1870; Private Albert Ford of Company H-wounded-duty August 19, 1870; Private Gustavus Smith of Company H-wounded-duty August 9, 1870; Private Robert Stuart of Company H-wounded-duty August 6, 1870; Acting Assistant Surgeon G.W. Hatch—gunshot flesh wound of left foot—furloughed August 20, 1870 {Surgical report.pp;6; 59; 60; 69; 84; 85};
  • August:
    • 25th-Fort Concho-Haller-a citizen-accident wounded by a pistol while hunting with a Soldier-Haller died 41 days after accident {Surgical report. pp. 71–72}
  • September:
    • 1st-Pecos River-three men attacked by Indians-1 killed, 1 escaped/1 wounded by 3 gunshot flesh wounds and an arrow wound in head-died Sept 19, 1870 {Surgical report.p. 149. Report does not tell if these were military or civilians}
    • 19th—Jefferson—1st Sgt Daniel Murphy—Co I 11th US Infantry—committed suicide with a derringer pistol {Surgical Report.p. 33}
  • October:
    • 5th/6th- Little Wichita River aka "Skirmish at Bluff Creek"-Indian guide James B. Doshier and five soldiers of Company M of the 6th US Cavalry {Sgt. Michael Welch, Cpl. Samuel Bowden, Cpl. Daniel Keating, Pvt. James Anderson; Pvt. Benjamin Wilson} receive Medal of Honor for gallantry
    • 14th—Fort Davis—Pvt Anderson Merryweather—band of the 9th US Cavalry—shot by persons unknown—died October 16, 1870 {Surgical Report .p. 45}
  • November:
    • 11th—Fort Brown—Pvt Thomas Logan—Co K 10th US Inf—killed after having attempted to escape after being arrested for being without permission in Brownsville {Surgical Report .p. 36. date of death from VA Records}
    • 12th-2 days camp from Fort Richardson- Indian engagement with 6th US Cavalry-12 Comanche scattered after charge by Captain Chaffee-7 ponies and 2 saddles found.[16]
    • 26th—Fort Richardson—Pvt John Murphy—Co M, 6th US Cavalry—received in an affray a gunshot wound of the abdomen—admitted to Post hospital November 27, 1870—discharged from the service December 27, 1870 {Surgical Report .p. 50}
  • December:
    • 20th-Fort Richardson-1st Lt Henry B. Mellon, 6th Cavalry age 43-while traveling from Camp Wichita to Fort Richardson was caught in a "norther"; found on the 22nd; taken to the Hospital December 23, 1870-loss of both feet By July 1871 stump of the right foot had healed and the condition of left was favorable. {See Surgical Report .pp. 194–196}

References[edit]

  1. ^ [See also Freeman Bureau report Sept 1866 http://freedmensbureau.com/texas/clinton.htm]
  2. ^ [Annual Report of the Adjutant—General for the State of New York for the year 1895 .p. 1270]
  3. ^ [1]
  4. ^ [Annual Report of the Adjutant—General for the State of New York for the year 1895 .p. 1295 (Note:These two deaths are also reported in link "Freeman's Bureau online" regarding Texas and Dewitt County on article "Bureau of Refugees, Freedmen and Abandoned Lands" Reference only—copyrighted).}
  5. ^ [2]
  6. ^ Pinterest
  7. ^ Supplemental report of the Joint Committee on the Conduct of the War Sheridan's Report May 29, 1865 – Nov 4, 1866 .pp.72–77.{Note:The Handbook of Texas online alleges killings of 2 black soldiers to have occurred in Dewitt County Texas in 1866 by the Taylor Brothers. See [3]. However see link "Freeman's Bureau online" regarding 1866 killings of 2 black ex-soldiers in Texas and Dewitt County on article "Bureau of Refugees, Freedmen and Abandoned Lands" Reference only—copyrighted}.}
  8. ^ ODMP memorial
  9. ^ .p.157
  10. ^ House of Representatives Record .p.22
  11. ^ James R. Ketchum 1822-1867 biography
  12. ^ Life Of Lt General Chafee pp.64–65
  13. ^ The Montana Post November 13, 1868
  14. ^ [4]
  15. ^ 6th US Cavalry History, p. 242. Sgt William Winterbottom of Company A; Sgt George H. Eldridge of Company C; Sgt Thomas Kerrigan and 1st Sgt Alonzo Stokes of Company H; Sgt John May and 1st Sgt John Kirk of Company L; Corporal John Connor (Medal of Honor) of Company H; Corporal John J. Given of Company K {Posthumously}; Pvt Solon D. Neal and Bugler Claron A. Windus of Company L; Farrier Samuel Porter and Corporals James C. Watson and Charles E. Smith received Medal of Honor for Bravery/gallantry in action}
  16. ^ Life of Lt General Chaffee .p.66. See also 6th US Cavalry History .p.242

See also[edit]