Frank Demaree

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Frank Demaree
Frank Demaree 1940 Play Ball card.jpeg
Outfielder
Born: (1910-06-10)June 10, 1910
Winters, California
Died: August 10, 1958(1958-08-10) (aged 48)
Los Angeles, California
Batted: Right Threw: Right
MLB debut
July 22, 1932 for the Chicago Cubs
Last MLB appearance
June 13, 1944 for the St. Louis Browns
Career statistics
Batting average .299
Home runs 72
Runs batted in 591
Teams

Joseph Franklin Demaree (June 10, 1910 – August 10, 1958) born in Winters, California, was an American baseball outfielder. He played all or part of twelve seasons in the majors for the Chicago Cubs (1932–33 and 1935–38), New York Giants (1939–41), Boston Braves (1941–42), St. Louis Cardinals (1943) and St. Louis Browns (1944).

Career highlights[edit]

Demaree is one of four Pacific Coast League hitters to have had a 30 home runs, 30 stolen bases season (in 1934, in 186 games), along with Joc Pederson (2014, in 115 games), Lefty O'Doul (1927), and Hall of Famer Tony Lazzeri (1925).[1]

Demaree helped the Cubs win the National League pennant in 1932, 1935 and 1938. During his only season with the Cardinals he helped them to win the National League pennant in 1943. During his last season he helped the Browns win the American League pennant. He was named to the National League All-Star Team in 1936 and 1937.

He finished 7th in voting for the 1936 National League MVP for playing in 154 Games, having 605 At Bats, 93 Runs, 212 Hits, 34 Doubles, 3 Triples, 16 Home Runs, 96 RBI, 4 Stolen Bases, 49 Walks, .350 Batting Average, .400 On-base percentage, .496 Slugging Percentage, 300 Total Bases and 17 Sacrifice Hits.

He finished 15th in voting for the 1937 National League MVP for playing in 154 Games, having 615 At Bats, 104 Runs, 199 Hits, 36 Doubles, 6 Triples, 17 Home Runs, 115 RBI, 6 Stolen Bases, 57 Walks, .324 Batting Average, .382 On-base percentage, .485 Slugging Percentage, 298 Total Bases and 14 Sacrifice Hits.

He also led the National League in Grounding into Double Plays (23) in 1937.

References[edit]

  1. ^ [1]

Sources[edit]