George Mason II

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For other people named George Mason, see George Mason (disambiguation).
George Mason II
Born George Mason
1660
Accokeek, Stafford County, Colony of Virginia
Died 1716 (aged 55–56)
Port Tobacco, Charles County, Province of Maryland
Resting place
Accokeek, Stafford County, Virginia
Residence Accokeek, Stafford County, Virginia
Chopawamsic, Stafford County, Virginia
Nationality American
Ethnicity English
Citizenship United States
Occupation House of Burgesses member, Stafford County sheriff, Stafford County county lieutenant, justice of the peace, Stafford County militia colonel, planter, businessperson
Religion Anglican
Spouse(s) Mary Fowke
Elizabeth Waugh
Sarah Taliaferro
Children Ann Fowke Mason
Elizabeth Mason
George Mason III
Nicholson Mason
French Mason
Mary Mason
Simpha Rosa Ann Field Mason
Catherine Mason
Gerard Mason
Thomas Mason
Francis Mason
Sarah Mason
Parents George Mason I
Mary French
Relatives grandfather of George Mason IV

George Mason II (1660–1716)[1][2][3] was an early American planter and statesman. Mason was the grandfather of George Mason IV, a Founding Father of the United States.[1]

Early life[edit]

Mason was born in 1660 at Accokeek plantation in Stafford County, Virginia.[1][3] He was the only son of George Mason I and his first wife Mary French.[1][3] He was the first of Virginia's Mason family to be born in British America.

Political career[edit]

Like his father, Mason served as a colonel in the Stafford County militia and represented Stafford in the House of Burgesses.[2] He also served as the county's sheriff and justice of the peace between 1699 and 1700.[2][4] Mason also received funding from the county to build what was probably Stafford's first jail in 1690.[2] Also between 1699 and 1700, Mason was county lieutenant of Stafford County, under General Nicholson, and was engaged in the defense of the Potomac region against Native Americans.[4]

Business ventures[edit]

In 1691, the town of Marlborough was laid out on the same neck of land in the Potomac River that included Accokeek plantation.[2] Mason was granted multiple lots in Marlborough and may have built a tavern there.[2]

Mason sold Accokeek after his father's death and relocated to a plantation on Chopawamsic Creek which he named Chopawamsic.[2] At Chopawamsic, Mason planted an orchard, grew tobacco, and raised sheep and cattle.[2]

Marriage and children[edit]

Mason married his cousin Mary Fowke, daughter of Gerard Fowke and Ann Thorogood, in 1688.[1][3] The couple had the following children:[1]

  • Ann Fowke Mason Fitzhugh Darrell Smith[1]
  • Elizabeth Mason Roy[1]
  • George Mason III (1690–March 5, 1735)[1]
  • Nicholson Mason (1694–1715 or 1716)[1]
  • French Mason (1695–1748)[1]
  • Mary Mason Fitzhugh Strother (born circa 1700)[1]
  • Simpha Rosa Ann Field Mason Dinwiddie Bronaugh (1703–November 22, 1761)[1]

Mason married secondly to Elizabeth Waugh in Stafford County, Virginia in 1706.[1][3] George and Elizabeth had one daughter:[1]

  • Catherine Mason (June 21, 1707–June 15, 1750)[1]

Mason married for a third time to Sarah Taliaferro, daughter of Francis Taliaferro and Elizabeth Catlett, in 1710.[1][3] George and Sarah had four children:[1]

  • Gerard Mason[1]
  • Thomas Mason[1]
  • Francis Mason (born 1711)[1]
  • Sarah Mason (born 1715)[1]

Later life[edit]

Mason died in 1716 in Port Tobacco, Charles County, Maryland.[1][2][3] He was interred on a hillside with his father near the site of the old Accokeek estate near Accokeek Creek in Stafford County, Virginia.[2]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w Gunston Hall. "George Mason II". Gunston Hall. Retrieved March 21, 2009. 
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h i j Lee Woolf (April 7, 2002). "George Mason gets memorial in D.C.". The Free Lance-Star Publishing Company. Retrieved March 21, 2008. 
  3. ^ a b c d e f g French Family Association (2008). "Children of Dennis French, A.2". French Family Association. Retrieved March 21, 2008. 
  4. ^ a b Evisum Inc. (2000). "Virtual American Biographies". Declaration of Independence. Retrieved March 21, 2008.