Glires

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Glires
Temporal range: Early Paleocene - Recent
Kangaroo rat (Dipodomys)
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Animalia
Class: Mammalia
Infraclass: Eutheria
Magnorder: Boreoeutheria
Superorder: Euarchontoglires

Glires (Latin glīrēs, dormice) is a clade (sometimes ranked as a grandorder) consisting of rodents and lagomorphs (rabbits, hares, and pikas). The hypothesis that these form a monophyletic group has been long debated based on morphological evidence, although recent morphological studies strongly supports the monophyly of Glires (Meng and Wyss, 2001; Meng et al., 2003). In particular, the discovery of new fossil material of basal members of Glires, particularly the genera Mimotona, Gomphos, Heomys, Matutinia, Rhombomylus, and Sinomylus, has helped to bridge the gap between more typical rodents and lagomorphs (Meng et al., 2003; Asher et al., 2005). Data based on nuclear DNA support Glires as a sister of Euarchonta to form Euarchontoglires (Murphy et al. and Madsen et al. 2001), but some genetic data from both nuclear and mitochondrial DNA have been less supportive (Arnason et al. 2002). A study investigating retrotransposon presence/absence data unambiguously supports the Glires hypothesis (Kriegs et al. 2007).

Euarchontoglires
Glires

Rodentia (rodents)



Lagomorpha (rabbits, hares, pikas)



Euarchonta

Scandentia (treeshrews)


Primatomorpha

Dermoptera (flying lemurs)




Primates (†Plesiadapiformes, Strepsirrhini, Haplorrhini)






References[edit]

  • Madsen O, Scally M, Douady CJ, et al. (February 2001). "Parallel adaptive radiations in two major clades of placental mammals". Nature 409 (6820): 610–4. doi:10.1038/35054544. PMID 11214318. 
  • Meng J, Wyss AR (2001). "The morphology of Tribosphenomys (Rodentiaformes, Mammalia): phylogenetic implications for basal Glires". J. Mammal. Evol. 8 (1): 1–71. doi:10.1023/A:1011328616715. 
  • Murphy WJ, Eizirik E, Johnson WE, Zhang YP, Ryder OA, O'Brien SJ (February 2001). "Molecular phylogenetics and the origins of placental mammals". Nature 409 (6820): 614–8. doi:10.1038/35054550. PMID 11214319.