Gold leaf

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A gold nugget of 5 mm in diameter (bottom) can be expanded through hammering into a gold foil of about 0.5 square meter. Toi museum, Japan.
Early 20th century leather book cover, with gold leaf ornamentation.

Gold leaf is gold that has been hammered into extremely thin sheets by goldbeating and is often used for gilding. Gold leaf is available in a wide variety of karats and shades. The most commonly used gold is 22-karat yellow gold.

Gold leaf is sometimes confused with metal leaf but they are different products. The term metal leaf is normally used for thin sheets of metal of any color that do not contain any real gold. Pure gold is 24 karats. Real yellow gold leaf is about 91% pure gold. Silver colored white gold is approximately 50% pure gold.

Layering gold leaf over a surface is called gold leafing or gilding. Traditional water gilding is the most difficult and highly regarded form of gold leafing. It has remained virtually unchanged for hundreds of years and is still done by hand.

Gold leaf in art[edit]

22k gold leaf applied with an ox hair brush during the process of gilding

Gold leaf is sometimes used in art in a "raw" state, without a gilding process. In cultures including the European Bronze Age it was used to wrap objects such as bullae simply by folding it tightly over, and the Classical group of gold lunulae are so thin, especially in the centre, that they might be classed as gold leaf. It has been used in jewellery in various periods, often as small pieces hanging freely.

Gold leaf has traditionally been most popular and most common in its use as gilding material for decoration of art (including statues and Eastern Christian icons) or the picture frames that are often used to hold or decorate paintings, mixed media, small objects (including jewelry) and paper art. Gold glass is gold leaf held between two pieces of glass, and was used for decorated Ancient Roman vessels, where some of the gold was scraped off to form an image, as well as tesserae gold mosaics. "Gold-ground" paintings, where the background of the figures was all in gold, was introduced in mosaics in later Early Christian art, and then used in icons and Western panel paintings until the late Middle Ages; all techniques use gold leaf. "Gold" frames made without leafing are also available for a considerably lower price, but traditionally some form of gold or metal leaf was preferred when possible and gold leafed (or silver leafed) moulding is still commonly available from many of the companies that produce commercially-available moulding for use as picture frames.

Culinary uses[edit]

Gold leaf (as well as other Metal leaf such as Vark) is sometimes used to decorate food or drink, typically to promote a perception of luxury and high value, though it is flavorless.[1] It is occasionally found in desserts and confectionery, including chocolates and mithai. In India it may be used effectively as a garnish, with thin sheets placed on a main dish, especially on festive occasions.

Austrian Liquor with gold leaves

In Continental Europe liquors with tiny floating pieces of gold leaf are known of since the late 16th century; originally the practice was regarded as medicinal. Well-known examples are Danziger Goldwasser, originally from Gdańsk, Poland, which has been produced since at least 1598, Goldstrike from Amsterdam, and the Swiss Goldschläger, which is perhaps the best known in the United States.

Smoking pure, 24K golden rolling papers has become popular in the US and now the trend is expanding to Europe too. The paper is created by the mixing of gold with fine paper, obtaining a perfectly consistent burning paper on the inside. The new gold version even stayed lit longer and burned better, leaving gold in the ashes.

The E-number for gold is E175.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Hopkins, Jerry (2004). Extreme Cuisine: The Weird & Wonderful Foods that People Eat. Tuttle Publishing. pp. 289–292. ISBN 978-0794602550. Retrieved 2013-08-15. 

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