ibiblio

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Not to be confused with Ibibio people or Ibibio language.
This article is about the digital library and archive project. For other uses, see Metalab (disambiguation).
ibiblio
Web address ibiblio.org
Slogan The public's library and digital archive
Commercial? No
Type of site Digital library and archive
Registration Optional
Available in Multilingual, but predominately English
Owner University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Created by University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and Sun Microsystems
Launched ca. 1992
Alexa rank negative increase 23,291 (April 2014)[1]
Current status Online

ibiblio (formerly SunSITE.unc.edu and MetaLab.unc.edu[2]) is a "collection of collections," and hosts a diverse range of publicly available information and open source content, including software, music, literature, art, history, science, politics, and cultural studies. As an "Internet librarianship," ibiblio is a digital library and archive project. It is run by the School of Information and Library Science and the School of Journalism and Mass Communication at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, with partners including the Center for the Public Domain, IBM, and SourceForge.[3] It also offers streaming audio radio stations. In November 1994 it started the first internet radio stream by rebroadcasting WXYC, the UNC student-run radio station. It also takes credit for the first non-commercial IPv6 / Internet2 radio stream. Unless otherwise specified, all material on ibiblio is assumed to be[4] in the public domain.

ibiblio is a member of the Open Library and Open Content Alliance.

History[edit]

In 1992, the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill developed SunSITE.unc.edu, which was to be an archive and an information sharing project for the public. It was funded by grants from Sun Microsystems, and thus the name. The relationship with Sun came to an end (an amicable one, according to the ibiblio FAQ; the change in name was for a "vendor-neutral name that expressed what our project has evolved into over the years"[5]) and the name was changed to MetaLab. It collaborated with various sources, including academic institutions, corporate businesses, and information technology entrepreneurs. In September 2000, MetaLab began to collaborate with the Center for the Public Domain; the name was changed to ibiblio to reflect the goal of being "the public's library and digital archive."

2002[6] 2006[6] 2008[7]
Collections 800 1600+ 2500+
Visits (ftp+www/day) 3 million 15+ million 16+ million
Data (terabytes) 1 8 13
Web servers 1 large, 2 peripherals 22 www/vhosts 25 www/vhost servers
Database servers 2 5 7
Radio stations 4 7 6

See also[edit]

Currently supported projects[edit]

Lists[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Ibiblio.org Site Info". Alexa Internet. Retrieved 2014-04-01. 
  2. ^ Collaboration and Cooperation. Ibiblio.org (2007-06-14). Retrieved on 2010-09-29.
  3. ^ "Who are your major contributors/partners?". FAQ. ibiblio. Retrieved 2008-06-25. 
  4. ^ "Home to one of the largest "collections of collections" on the Internet, ibiblio.org is a conservancy of freely available information, including software, music, literature, art, history, science, politics, and cultural studies.". about. ibiblio. Retrieved 2009-02-18. 
  5. ^ ibiblio FAQ, "Why did you change names from SunSite to MetaLab? Why did you change the name from MetaLab to ibiblio?." Chapel Hill, North Carolina, U.S.A.
  6. ^ a b "2006 of ibiblio". ibiblio.org. 2006. Retrieved 2008-08-21. 
  7. ^ "2007-08 of ibiblio". ibiblio.org. 2008. Retrieved 2008-08-21. 
  8. ^ Cafe au Lait Java News and Resources. Cafeaulait.org. Retrieved on 2010-09-29.
  9. ^ People's Movement for an Independent Tibet. Friends of Tibet. Retrieved on 2010-09-29.
  10. ^ General-Purpose computation on Graphics Processing Units. GPGPU.org. Retrieved on 2010-09-29.
  11. ^ Osprey | Peer-to-peer enabled content distribution. Osprey.ibiblio.org (1999-02-22). Retrieved on 2010-09-29.
  12. ^ welcome to world tibet day website. Worldtibetday.org. Retrieved on 2010-09-29.

External links[edit]