Immutability (theology)

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The Immutability of God is an attribute where “God is unchanging in his character, will, and covenant promises." [1]

The Westminster Shorter Catechism says, ’God is a spirit, whose being, wisdom power, holiness, justice, goodness, and truth are infinite, eternal, and unchangeable.” Those things do not change. A number of Scriptures attest to this idea (e.g. Num. 23:19; 1 Sam. 15:29; Ps. 102:26; Mal. 3:6; 2 Tim. 2:13; Heb. 6:17–18; Jam. 1:17) [2]

God's immutability defines all his other attributes: he is immutably wise, he cannot but be merciful, good, and gracious. The same may be said about his knowledge: God does not need to gain knowledge; he knows all things, eternally and immutably so. Infiniteness and immutability in God are mutually supportive and imply each other. An infinite and changing God is inconceivable; indeed it is a contradiction in definition. [3]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ The Immutability of God, Theopedia: http://www.theopedia.com/Immutability_of_God
  2. ^ http://reformedanswers.org/answer.asp/file/40331
  3. ^ The Immutability of God: http://www.tecmalta.org/tft133.htm/