Jack Laviolette

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Jack Laviolette
Hockey Hall of Fame, 1963
Jack Laviolette.jpg
Born (1879-07-17)July 17, 1879
Belleville, ON, CAN
Died January 9, 1960(1960-01-09) (aged 80)
Montreal, QC, CAN
Height 5 ft 11 in (180 cm)
Weight 170 lb (77 kg; 12 st 2 lb)
Position Defence/Winger
Shot Right
Played for Montreal Le National
Michigan Soo Indians
Montreal Shamrocks
Montreal Canadiens
Playing career 1903–1918

John "Jack" Laviolette (July 17, 1879 – January 9, 1960) was a Canadian professional ice hockey player. Laviolette played nine seasons for the Montreal Canadiens hockey club and was their first captain, coach, and general manager.

Laviolette was one of the first francophone stars of ice hockey. He was born in Belleville, Ontario, but grew up in Valleyfield, Quebec. He was an outstanding scorer from the defenceman position. But Laviolette's true place in hockey history has less to do with his scoring prowess and more to do with his role as the true founding organizer of the Canadiens hockey club. He was their first player, coach and general manager in their inaugural 1910 season.

With the formation of the National Hockey Association (NHA) in December 1909, (replaced 7 years later by the NHL), team/league owner Ambrose O'Brien asked Laviolette to put together a team made up of French Canadian players to play as the "Les Canadiens" franchise in Montreal. Laviolette completed the task in time for the NHA's inaugural season. Among those that would sign on to that first team would be future hall of famers Newsy Lalonde, Didier Pitre and the "Chicoutimi Cucumber," Georges Vezina. The team he built would go on to be the most successful franchise in professional hockey.

Playing career[edit]

Laviolette would first play elite-level senior men's amateur hockey in 1904 for the Montreal Le National, famous for being one of the first men's teams composed of francophones. From 1905 onward, he would play as a professional, first with the Soo Indians of the International Professional Hockey League for three seasons, and then return to Montreal to play for Montreal Shamrocks in the 1908 and 1909 seasons.

He would then star for the new Canadiens franchise from 1910 until 1918 scoring 45 goals in 147 games, winning the Stanley Cup in 1916.

Laviolette lost his right foot in an automobile accident in 1918, ending his playing career. A benefit game for Laviolette was arranged at the Mount Royal Arena in 1921. He was the guest of honour, and also refereed.

Career statistics[edit]

    Regular season   Playoffs
Season Team League GP G A Pts PIM GP G A Pts PIM
1903–04 Montreal Nationals FAHL 6 8 0 8
1904–05 Michigan Soo Indians IHL 24 15 0 15 24
1905–06 Michigan Soo Indians IHL 17 15 0 15 28
1906–07 Michigan Soo Indians IHL 19 10 7 17 34
1907–08 Montreal Shamrocks ECAHA 6 1 0 1 36
1908–09 Montreal Shamrocks ECHA 9 1 0 1 36
1909–10 Montreal Canadiens NHA 12 4 0 4 41
1910–11 Montreal Canadiens NHA 16 0 0 0 24
1911–12 Montreal Canadiens NHA 17 7 0 7 10
1912–13 Montreal Canadiens NHA 20 8 0 8 77
1913–14 Montreal Canadiens NHA 20 7 9 16 30 2 0 1 1 0
1914–15 Montreal Canadiens NHA 18 6 3 9 35
1915–16 Montreal Canadiens NHA 18 8 3 11 62
1915–16 Montreal Canadiens St-Cup 4 0 0 0 6
1916–17 Montreal Canadiens NHA 17 7 3 10 24
1916–17 Montreal Canadiens St-Cup 4 1 2 3 9
1917–18 Montreal Canadiens NHL 18 2 1 3 6 2 0 0 0 0
IHL totals 60 40 7 47 86
NHA totals 138 47 18 65 303 4 0 1 1 0
St-Cup totals 8 1 2 3 15

Awards and achievements[edit]

References[edit]

  • Hockey Hall of Fame (2003). Honoured Members: Hockey Hall of Fame. Bolton, Ontario: Fenn Publishing. ISBN 1-55168-239-7. 

External links[edit]

Preceded by
Position created
Head coach of the Montreal Canadiens
1910–11
Succeeded by
Adolphe Lecours
Preceded by
Position created
Montreal Canadiens captain
1910
Succeeded by
Newsy Lalonde
Preceded by
Newsy Lalonde
Montreal Canadiens captain
1911–12
Succeeded by
Newsy Lalonde
Preceded by
Position created
General Manager of the Montreal Canadiens
1909–10
with Joseph Cattarinich
Succeeded by
George Kennedy