Jim Peplinski

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Jim Peplinski
Jim Peplinski 2014.jpg
Born (1960-10-24) October 24, 1960 (age 53)
Renfrew, ON, CAN
Height 6 ft 3 in (191 cm)
Weight 210 lb (95 kg; 15 st 0 lb)
Position Forward
Played for Calgary Flames
NHL Draft 75th overall, 1979
Atlanta Flames
Playing career 1980–1990
1994–1995

James Desmond Peplinski (born October 24, 1960 in Renfrew, Ontario) is a Canadian former National Hockey League (NHL) player and captain for the Calgary Flames. He played ten seasons in the NHL and won the Stanley Cup in 1989. He represented Canada at the 1988 Winter Olympics as a member of the national hockey team.

Playing career[edit]

Peplinski played junior hockey for the Toronto Marlboros of the Ontario Major Junior Hockey League (OMJHL) between 1977 and 1980. He scored 101 points in 67 games in his final season of junior.[1] The Atlanta Flames selected him with their fourth round selection, 75th overall, at the 1979 NHL Entry Draft.[2] Following the franchise's relocation to Canada, he made his NHL debut in 1980 and was an original member of the Calgary Flames, scoring 38 points in his rookie season.[1] Playing his 100th career game on November 17, 1981, Peplinski scored four goals against the Winnipeg Jets as part of a career high 30-goal, 67-point season in 1980–81 season.[2]

One of Peplinski's strengths was his durability. He missed only 24 games during his career, appearing in all 80 of the Flames' games in 1980–81, 1982–83, 1984–85 and 1986–87.[1] He was named a co-captain of the team, shared with Lanny McDonald, in the 1984–85 season.[2] For the 1988 Winter Olympics, the International Ice Hockey Federation opened the hockey tournament to all professionals. While the NHL refused to allow most of its players to participate, the Flames released Peplinski to the Canadian Olympic team.[3] He appeared in seven games, scoring one assist for the fourth place Canadians.[4]

In the Flames' Stanley Cup championship season of 1988–89, Peplinski scored 38 points in 79 games, and appeared in 20 more games in the 1989 Stanley Cup Playoffs.[1] Prior to the sixth game of the final against the Montreal Canadiens, head coach Terry Crisp wanted to insert McDonald, who was expected to retire following the season, into the lineup for the possible clinching game. As a result, Peplinski was scratched from the line-up and watched as the team won the championship. He came onto the ice to accept the trophy with McDonald and alternate captain Tim Hunter.[5][6]

Six games into the 1989–90 NHL season, Peplinski chose to retire.[5] He left the game as the Flames' all-time leader in games played at 705.[2] He moved to the broadcast booth, joining Hockey Night in Canada as an analyst before attempting an NHL comeback in 1994–95. His comeback lasted six games before he left the game for good.[5] Peplinski settled in Calgary after his retirement and remains active with the team's alumni association. He organized the alumni game between the Flames and Canadiens at the 2011 Heritage Classic.[7]

Personal life[edit]

Following his playing career, Peplinski forged a successful business career in Calgary. He has served as the Executive Chairman of the Humberview Group of Companies which owns Jim Peplinski’s Leasemaster and nine automotive dealerships in Toronto along with various real estate investments. He is also the Vice President of Business Development of the Calgary Flames Hockey Club as well as an investor and director of Wrangler West Energy Corp., a public oil and gas company.

Peplinski has been recognized on multiple occasions for his charitable contributions, particularly those supporting children. He was named the final recipient of the Charlie Conacher Humanitarian Award in 1984 for his work in support of the Special Olympics and Big Brothers of Calgary.[8] The Flames named him their recipient of the Ralph T. Scurfield Humanitarian Award in 1988.[2]

Peplinski is married to his high school sweetheart Catherine Peplinski, and together they have 4 children, Erin, Matthew, Anny, and Quinn.

Career statistics[edit]

Regular season and playoffs[edit]

Peplinski prior to the alumni game at the 2011 Heritage Classic.
    Regular season   Playoffs
Season Team League GP G A Pts PIM GP G A Pts PIM
1977–78 Toronto Marlboros OMJHL 66 13 28 41 44 5 2 2 4 26
1978–79 Toronto Marlboros OMJHL 66 23 32 55 88 3 0 1 1 0
1979–80 Toronto Marlboros OMJHL 67 35 66 101 89 4 1 2 3 15
1980–81 Calgary Flames NHL 80 13 25 38 108 16 2 3 5 41
1981–82 Calgary Flames NHL 74 30 37 67 115 3 1 0 1 13
1982–83 Calgary Flames NHL 80 15 26 41 134 8 1 1 2 45
1983–84 Calgary Flames NHL 74 11 22 33 114 11 3 4 7 21
1984–85 Calgary Flames NHL 80 16 29 45 111 4 1 3 4 11
1985–86 Calgary Flames NHL 77 24 35 59 214 22 5 9 14 107
1986–87 Calgary Flames NHL 80 18 32 50 181 6 1 0 1 24
1987–88 Calgary Flames NHL 75 20 31 51 234 9 0 5 5 45
1988–89 Calgary Flames NHL 79 13 25 38 241 20 1 6 7 75
1989–90 Calgary Flames NHL 6 1 0 1 4
1994–95 Calgary Flames NHL 6 0 1 1 11
NHL totals 711 161 263 424 1467 99 15 31 46 382

International[edit]

Year Team Comp   GP G A Pts PIM
1988 Canada Oly 7 0 1 1 6

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d "Jim Peplinski profile". Hockey Hall of Fame. Retrieved 2012-03-17. 
  2. ^ a b c d e Ornest, Leo, ed. (1989). 1989–90 Calgary Flames Media Guide. Calgary Flames Hockey Club. p. 50. 
  3. ^ Podnieks, Andrew. Canada's Olympic Hockey History 1920–2010. Toronto: Fenn Publishing. pp. 149–151. ISBN 1-55168-323-7. 
  4. ^ Podnieks, Andrew. Canada's Olympic Hockey History 1920–2010. Toronto: Fenn Publishing. p. 240. ISBN 1-55168-323-7. 
  5. ^ a b c Podnieks, Andrew (2003). Players: The ultimate A–Z guide of everyone who has ever played in the NHL. Toronto: Doubleday Canada. p. 668. ISBN 0-385-25999-9. 
  6. ^ Duhatschek, Eric (1989-05-26). "Stanley Cup: Ours at last". Calgary Herald. p. A1. 
  7. ^ Gilbertson, Wes (2011-02-19). "Total recall". Calgary Sun. pp. S4–5. 
  8. ^ "Peplinski voted Conacher Award". Ottawa Citizen. 1984-05-30. p. 40. Retrieved 2012-03-18. 

External links[edit]

Preceded by
Lanny McDonald
Doug Risebrough
Calgary Flames captain
198489
with Doug Risebrough (1984-87)
and Lanny McDonald (1984-89)
Succeeded by
Brad McCrimmon

Note: During Jim Peplinski's tenure as captain of the Flames he shared the role of captain with Doug Risebrough (198487) and Lanny McDonald (198489), and then served as sole captain for the first six games of 1989–90, before retiring.