Johnny Hotbody

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Johnny Hotbody
Birth name Johnny Weiss
Born (1963-06-12) June 12, 1963 (age 51)
Resides Philadelphia, Pennsylvania[1]
Professional wrestling career
Ring name(s) Johnny Hotbody[2]
Billed height 5 ft 10 in (1.78 m)[1]
Billed weight 220 lb (100 kg)[1]
Trained by Larry Sharpe
Debut 1988[1]
Retired 2001

Johnny Weiss (born February 19, 1963) is an American retired professional wrestler, better known by his ring name Johnny Hotbody.[2] He is best known for his work in the Tri-State Wrestling Alliance and Extreme Championship Wrestling where he became the first ECW Triple Crown Champion.

Professional wrestling career[edit]

Early career[edit]

Johnny Hotbody broke into professional wrestling in the late 1980s after completing his training at The Monster Factory, operated by Larry Sharpe. He made a name for himself in several Pennsylvania and New Jersey- based independent promotions before signing with Philadelphia's Tri-State Wrestling Alliance (TWA) in 1990. Hotbody had a long-running feud with Tony Stetson. The TWA closed its doors suddenly in 1991, but was soon replaced by Eastern Championship Wrestling (later Extreme Championship Wrestling), run by Tod Gordon.

Eastern Championship Wrestling (1992-1993)[edit]

On April 26, 1992, Hotbody won the ECW Heavyweight Championship by defeating Jimmy Snuka.[2] He held the title for nearly three months, before losing it back to Snuka on July 14.[2] Later that year, on August 12, he became the first ever ECW Television Champion by defeating Larry Winters.[2][3] He was later forced to relinquish the title on September 12, 1992, after sustaining a legitimate broken ankle.[4]

Upon his return, he formed The Suicide Blondes with Chris Candido, and, for most of 1993, he competed in tag team competition. He won his first ECW Tag Team Championship with Candido on April 3, 1993, when they defeated Tony Stetson and Larry Winters.[2][5][6] Chris Michaels was later introduced as the third member of The Suicide Blondes, which resulted in The Suicide Blondes defending the Tag Team Championships under the Freebird Rule, which meant that any combination of the three were allowed to defend the championship.[7] He also began a feud with Tommy Cairo, attacking him after matches.[8][9] The Suicide Blondes defeated Cairo and J.T. Smith in a tag team match, and for the next few weeks Hotbody competed against Cairo in matches, losing a standard singles match to him, but winning a Lumberjack match.[10][11][12] They lost the Tag Team Championship to The Super Destroyers (A.J. Petrucci and Doug Stahl) on May 15, but the combination of Hotobdy and Michaels regained it that same day.[2][5][13] Later that year, on October 1, Hotbody, along with his former adversary Stetson, was awarded the Tag Team Championship, after the previous champions, The Dark Patriot and Eddie Gilbert, left the promotion, resulting in the titles being vacated.[2][5] They had successful title defenses against Badd Company (Paul Diamond and Pat Tanaka), The Sandman and J.T. Smith, and Ian and Axl Rotten over the next month.[14][15][16] They dropped the championship to Tommy Dreamer and Johnny Gunn, however, in a nine-second match, on November 13.[5][17]

Retirement[edit]

Hotbody later competed for the NWA New Jersey, where he was awarded the New Jersey version of the NWA World Light Heavyweight Championship on September 25, 1998.[2] He lost it to Rik Ratchett that same day. After successful tours in several Philadelphia-area independent promotions, Hotbody retired from active competition in 2001.

In wrestling[edit]

Championships and accomplishments[edit]

  • Other titles
    • NAWA United States Heavyweight Championship (1 time)

1Johnny Hotbody's reign occurred while the promotion was an NWA affiliate named Eastern Championship Wrestling, and was prior to the promotion becoming Extreme Championship Wrestling and the title being declared a world title by ECW.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h "Johnny Hotbody". BodySlamming.com. Retrieved 2009-04-12. 
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m "Johnny Hotbody profile". Online World of Wrestling. Retrieved 2009-04-12. 
  3. ^ a b "History of the ECW TV Championship". World Wrestling Entertainment. Retrieved 2009-04-12. 
  4. ^ Duncan, Royal; Will, Gary. "ECW Television Title / ECW World Television Title History". Wrestling Title Histories. Solie's Title Histories. Retrieved 2008-12-07. 
  5. ^ a b c d e "History of the ECW Tag Team Championship". World Wrestling Entertainment. Retrieved 2009-04-12. 
  6. ^ "Eastern Championship Wrestling Results - May 25, 1993 -- ECW Television in Philadelphia, PA". Online World of Wrestling. 1993-05-25. Retrieved 2009-04-12. 
  7. ^ "Eastern Championship Wrestling Results - June 8, 1993 -- ECW Television in Philadelphia, PA at ECW Arena". Online World of Wrestling. 1993-06-08. Retrieved 2009-04-12. 
  8. ^ "Eastern Championship Wrestling Results - April 6, 1993 -- ECW Television in Philadelphia, PA". Online World of Wrestling. 1993-04-06. Retrieved 2009-04-12. 
  9. ^ "Eastern Championship Wrestling Results - April 14, 1993 -- ECW Television in Philadelphia, PA". Online World of Wrestling. 1993-04-14. Retrieved 2009-04-12. 
  10. ^ "Eastern Championship Wrestling Results - April 28, 1993--ECW Television in Philadelphia,PA". Online World of Wrestling. 1993-04-28. Retrieved 2009-04-12. 
  11. ^ "Eastern Championship Wrestling Results - May 4, 1993 -- ECW Television in Philadelphia, PA". Online World of Wrestling. 1993-05-04. Retrieved 2009-04-12. 
  12. ^ "Eastern Championship Wrestling Results - May 11, 1993 -- ECW Television in Philadelphia, PA". Online World of Wrestling. 1993-05-11. Retrieved 2009-04-12. 
  13. ^ "Eastern Championship Wrestling Results - July 20, 1993 -- ECW Television in Philadelphia, PA at ECW Arena". Online World of Wrestling. 1993-07-20. Retrieved 2009-04-12. 
  14. ^ "Eastern Championship Wrestling Results - October 2, 1993 -- NWA Bloodfest: Part 2 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania at ECW Arena". Online World of Wrestling. 1993-10-02. Retrieved 2009-04-12. 
  15. ^ "Eastern Championship Wrestling Results - October 1, 1993 -- NWA Bloodfest: Part 1 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania at ECW Arena". Online World of Wrestling. 1993-10-01. Retrieved 2009-04-12. 
  16. ^ "Eastern Championship Wrestling Results - November 13, 1993 -- November to Remember in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania at ECW Arena:". Online World of Wrestling. 1993-11-13. Retrieved 2009-04-12. 
  17. ^ Milner, John M.; Kapur, Bob. "Tommy Dreamer". Slam! Sports. Canadian Online Explorer. Retrieved 2009-04-12. 
  18. ^ Royal Duncan & Gary Will (2000). Wrestling Title Histories (4th ed.). Archeus Communications. ISBN 0-9698161-5-4. 

External links[edit]