Julia Flavia

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Roman imperial dynasties
Flavian dynasty
Büste der Julia Titi.jpg
Marble bust of Julia Titi Flavia
Chronology
Vespasian 69 AD79 AD
Titus 79 AD81 AD
Domitian 81 AD96 AD
Family
Gens Flavia
Flavian tree
Category:Flavian dynasty
Succession
Preceded by
Year of the Four Emperors
Followed by
Nerva–Antonine dynasty
Julia Flavia hairstyle, Terracotta made in Smyrna, c. 90 - Louvre

Flavia Julia Titi (13 September 64 – 91) was the daughter and only child to Emperor Titus from his second marriage to the well-connected Marcia Furnilla. Her parents divorced when Julia was an infant, due to her mother's family being connected to the opponents of Roman Emperor Nero. In 65, after the failure of the Pisonian conspiracy, the family of Marcia Furnilla was disfavored by Nero. Julia's father, Titus considered that he didn't want to be connected with any potential plotters and ended his marriage to Marcia Furnilla. Julia was raised by her father. Julia had been born in Rome and Titus conquered Jerusalem on Julia's sixth birthday.

When growing up, Titus offered her in marriage to his brother Domitian, but he refused because of his infatuation with Domitia Longina. Later she married her second paternal cousin T. Flavius Sabinus, brother to consul T. Flavius Clemens, who married her first cousin Flavia Domitilla. By then Domitian had seduced her.

When her father and husband died, in the words of Dio, Domitian:

"lived with [her] as husband with wife, making little effort at concealment. Then upon the demands of the people he became reconciled with Domitia, but continued his relations with Julia nonetheless."[1]

Juvenal condemns this liaison as follows:

"Such a man was that adulterer [i.e. Domitian] who, after lately defiling himself by a union of the tragic style, revived the stern laws that were to be a terror to all men – ay, even to Mars and Venus – just as Julia was relieving her fertile womb and giving birth to abortions that displayed the likeness of her uncle."[2]

Becoming pregnant, Julia died of what was rumored (though unlikely) to be a forced abortion. Julia was deified and her ashes were later mixed and smoked with Domitian's by an old nurse secretly in the Temple of the Flavians.[3]

Ancestry[edit]

Nerva–Antonine family tree[edit]

  • (1) = 1st spouse
  • (2) = 2nd spouse (not shown)
  • (3) = 3rd spouse
  • Darker purple indicates Emperor of the Nerva-Antonine dynasty; lighter purple indicates designated imperial heir of said dynasty who never reigned
  • dashed lines indicate adoption; dotted lines indicate love affairs/unmarried relationships
  • small caps = posthumously deified (Augusti, Augustae, or other)


Q. Marcius Barea Soranus Q. Marcius Barea Sura Antonia Furnilla M. Cocceius Nerva Sergia Plautilla P. Aelius Hadrianus
Titus
(r. 79-81)
Marcia Furnilla Marcia Trajanus Pater Nerva
(r. 96–98)
Ulpia Aelius Hadrianus Marullinus
Julia Flavia Marciana G. Salonius Matidius Trajan
(r. 98–117)
Plotina P. Acilius Attianus P. Aelius Afer Paulina Major L. Julius Ursus Servianus
Lucius Mindius
(2)
Libo Rupilius Frugi
(3)
Matidia L. Vibius Sabinus
(1)
Antinous Hadrian (r. 117–138) Paulina
Minor
Matidia Minor Suetonius Sabina
M.
Annius Verus
G. Fuscus Salinator I Julia Serviana Paulina
Rupilia Faustina Boionia Procilla G. Arrius Antoninus
L. Caesennius Paetus L. Ceionius Commodus Appia Severa G. Fuscus Salinator II
Arria Antonia Arria Fadilla T. Aurelius Fulvus
L. Caesennius Antoninus Lucius
Commodus
Fundania Plautia Ignota Plautia G. Avidius
Nigrinus
Antoninus Pius
(r. 138–161)
M. Annius Verus Domitia Lucilla Fundania M. Annius Libo FAUSTINA Lucius Aelius
Caesar
Avidia Plautia
Cornificia MARCUS AURELIUS
(r. 161–180)
FAUSTINA Minor G. Avidius Cassius Aurelia Fadilla LUCIUS VERUS
(r. 161–169)
(1)
Ceionia Fabia Plautius Quintillus Q. Servilius Pudens Ceionia Plautia
Cornificia Minor M. Petronius Sura COMMODUS
(r. 177–192)
Fadilla M. Annius Verus Caesar T. Claudius Pompeianus (2) Lucilla M. Plautius Quintillus Junius Licinius Balbus Servilia Ceionia
Petronius Antoninus L. Aurelius Agaclytus
(2)
Aurelia Sabina L. Antistius Burrus
(1)
Plautius Quintillus Plautia Servilla G. Furius Sabinus Timesitheus Antonia Gordiana Junius Licinius Balbus
Furia Sabina Tranquillina GORDIAN III
(r. 238-244)

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Cassius Dio, 67.3
  2. ^ Juvenal, Satires ii.32.
  3. ^ Suetonius, Domitian 17.3

Further reference[edit]

Media related to Julia Titi at Wikimedia Commons