Kasatka-class submarine

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Russian submarine Kasatka.png
Russian submarine Kasatka
Class overview
Name: Kasatka
Builders: Baltic works
Operators: Imperial Russian Navy
In commission: 1904–1922
Completed: 6
Lost: 2
Retired: 4
General characteristics
Type: Submarine
Displacement: 140 tons surfaced
177 tons submerged
Length: 33.5 m
Beam: 3.5 m
Draught: 3.4 m
Propulsion: 1 shaft petrol/ electric (later diesel electric)
200 hp/100 hp
Speed: 8.5 knots surfaced / 5.5 knots submerged
Complement: 24
Armament: 4 external torpedoes in drop collars, 1 machine gun (later 1 x 47mm gun)

The Kasatka class were a group of submarines built for the Imperial Russian Navy. The six boats were built between 1904 and 1905. They were designed by I.G. Bubnov and were based on the Delfin. The first boat Kasatka experienced significant problems with stability on trials and had to have extra flotation added. The boats were re-built around 1910 with diesel engines added (120 hp) and new conning towers replacing the older structure.

Ships[edit]

All six boats were built by Baltic works St. Petersburg and launched in 1904

Ship namesake Service
Keta (ex Feldmarshal Graf Sheremetev) A type of Salmon, (Boris Sheremetev) The boat was paid for by public subscription with the Sheremetev family as major donors. Arrived Valdivostok in 1905, transferred to the Baltic in 1915, Broken up 1922
Kasatka (Касатка) Orca Transferred to Vladivostok 1905, To Baltic 1915, to Caspian Sea 1918, Broken up 1922
Makrel (Макрель) Mackrel Transferred to Vladivostok 1905, To Baltic 1915, to Caspian Sea 1918, Broken up 1922
Nalim (Налим) Burbot Transferred to Vladivostok 1905, To Black Sea Fleet 1915, captured by Germans 1918, Taken by white Russians 1919, Scuttled at Sevastopol April 1919
Okun (Окунь) Perch Transferred to Vladivostok 1905, To Baltic 1915, to Caspian Sea 1918, Broken up 1922
Skat (Скат) Skate Transferred to Vladivostok 1905, To Black Sea Fleet 1915, captured by Germans 1918, Taken by white Russians 1919, Scuttled at Sevastopol April 1919

References[edit]

  • Conway's All the World's Fighting Ships 1906-1922