List of kings of Munster

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Munster about the year 900

The name Munster is derived from the Gaelic God, Muman. The province of Munster was once divided into six regions: Tuadh Mhuman (north Munster), Des Mhuman (south Munster), Aur/Ur Mumhan (east Munster), Iar mumhan or Iarmuman (west Munster), Ernaibh Muman (the Ernai tribe's portion of Munster), and Deisi Muman (the Deisi tribe's portion of Munster). Ultimately, these were all subsumed into the kingdoms of Thomond (north), Desmond (south), and Ormond (east), all of which were eventually subsumed by surrender and regrant as Earldoms in the Peerage of Ireland. The names exist only indirectly today, particularly in the case of Thomond. The three crowns represent these three kingdoms.

Ancient and Mythological Kings of Munster[edit]

Historical Kings of Cashel, Iarmuman, and Munster[edit]

These were not true kings of Munster until the late 7th century, when the Corcu Loígde fell entirely from power, some time after losing their grip on the Kingdom of Osraige. Thus approximately the first twenty five kings below are best described as Kings of Cashel, Kings of Iarmuman, or Kings of the Eóganachta. Faílbe Flann mac Áedo Duib, the only exception, was the first Eóganacht to significantly project outside Munster, but Iarmuman was still a great rival of Cashel in his time, and little is known of his successors before Cathal mac Finguine.

At and before this time also flourished the independent Uí Fidgenti and Uí Liatháin, a pair of shadowy sister kingdoms whose official origins appear to have been tampered with in the 8th century in a semi-successful attempt to integrate them into the Eóganachta political structure and genealogical scheme. Diplomatic relations and an alliance were achieved with the Uí Fidgenti, much to the credit of the Eóganachta, but for unknown reasons the Uí Liatháin remained effective outsiders.

Of the Eóganachta, unless noted.

Kings of Munster from 970[edit]

Of the Dál gCais, or, if marked (E), the Eóganacht.

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

References[edit]

  • Bryne, Francis J. Irish Kings and High Kings. New York: St. Martin's Press, 1973.
  • Charles-Edwards, T.M. Early Christian Ireland. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2000. ISBN 0-521-36395-0
  • Moody, T.W.; F.J. Byrne and F.X. Martin, ed. A New History of Ireland. Vol. IX. New York: Oxford University Press, 1982. ISBN 0-19-821744-7
  • Áed Ua Crimthainn, Book of Leinster, c. 1160.
  • The Laud Synchronisms. K. Meyer, 1913.

External links[edit]