Kwame R. Brown

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Kwame R. Brown
Kwamebrowndc.jpg
8th Chairman of the Council of the District of Columbia
In office
January 2, 2011 – June 6, 2012
Preceded by Vincent C. Gray
Succeeded by Phil Mendelson
At-Large Member of the
Council of the District of Columbia
In office
January 3, 2005 – January 2, 2011
Preceded by Harold Brazil
Succeeded by Sekou Biddle
Personal details
Born Kwame R. Brown
(1970-10-13) October 13, 1970 (age 44)
Washington, D. C., U.S.
Political party Democratic Party
Alma mater Morgan State University

Kwame R. Brown[1] (born October 13, 1970)[2] is an American politician in Washington, D.C., who was an at-large member of the council from 2005 to 2011 and chairman of the Council of the District of Columbia from 2011 until his resignation in June 2012.[3] He was the second councilman to resign in the face of federal charges in 2012.

Biography[edit]

Kwame R. Brown was born on October 13, 1970, at Columbia Hospital for Women in Washington, D.C. Brown graduated from Woodrow Wilson High School and participated in the Mayor's Youth Leadership Institute. Brown continued his education at Morgan State University in Baltimore, earning a Bachelor of Arts in Marketing. Brown is a graduate of both the Minority Business Executive Program, & Advanced Business Executive Program at the Amos Tuck School of Business, Dartmouth College and the Senior Executives in State & Local Government Program at the John F. Kennedy School of Government, Harvard University.[4]

Brown was first elected to the Council in 2004, winning 55.4% of votes citywide in the general election,[5] after defeating incumbent Councilmember Harold Brazil in the primary with 54.09% of the vote.[6]

Brown was up for reelection in 2008 and faced no opposition in the Democratic primary. When asked why no one was running against him, he stated, "People run because they're tired of elected officials not doing anything." Brown, who lives in Hillcrest, continued, 'No one's running, because I've done what I said I was going to do."[7]

Political career[edit]

Brown co-introduced the School Modernization and Financing Act of 2005, which was to construct, renovate, and modernize public schools in the District. The Act also authorized the mayor to borrow $1 billion, which would be repaid with $60 million annual payments from revenue from the future District lottery.[8]

Later, Brown authored the amendment that led to $48 million for vocational education to build the Phelps Architecture, Construction and Engineering Academy.[9] Students at the newly built school would be able to attend courses in vocational subjects and pursue aprenticeship and certification.[10]

Brown authored the Creative Learning Program Act to require that all elementary schools are taught music, visual arts, and physical education each week effective the 2008-2009 school year.[11] The Act requires the subjects to be taught weekly but does not specify the curriculum or guidelines of the educational programs.[11]

Brown authored the Compliance and Enforcement Agency Establishment Act of 2007, which establishes a Compliance and Enforcement Agency in the District government.[12] The Agency would be responsible to ensure that developers meet environmental standards, affordable-housing requirements, and laws involving hiring local employees.[12]

Brown cosponsored the Small Business Commercial Property Tax Relief Act of 2007.[13] The Act reduced the commercial and industrial property tax rate for properties assessed at less than $3 million.[14] The Act also increased the amount of tangible personal property exempt from the personal property tax to $225,000.[14]

In addition, Brown authored the Minority and Women-Owned Business Assessment Act of 2007 to determine how many minority- and women-owned businesses were receiving contracts from the District.[15] The Act also authorized an assessment of whether the District government should increase the number of contracts awarded to such businesses and, if so, how to do so.[15]

During his tenure as an at-large member of the City Council, Brown served as Chair of the Council's Committee on Economic Development.[16]

Council Chair[edit]

On March 31, 2010, Brown announced that he would pursue the DC Council Chairmanship, one day after the current seat holder Vincent C. Gray announced his candidacy for Mayor for that year's election, making him ineligible to regain his office, which expires in January 2011. This eliminated earlier speculation that Brown would pursue the Mayoral seat against incumbent Adrian Fenty.[1]

On September 14, 2010, Brown won the Democratic primary for Chairperson, receiving 55 percent of the vote to former Ward 5 Councilman Vincent Orange's 39 percent and school board member Dorothy Douglas' 6 percent. He faced no opposition in the November 2 general election, and Brown was sworn in as Chairman of the DC Council on January 2, 2011.[17]

In the midst of a significant revenue shortfall for the District, as Chairman-elect of the Council, Brown requested the District order a Lincoln Navigator L for his use.[18] The vehicle costs the city $1,963.28 a month to lease and it was shown that Brown rejected an earlier model that did not have a "black on black" interior.[19]

On June 6, 2012, Federal prosecutors charged D.C. Council Chairman Kwame Brown with one count of bank fraud in U.S. District Court.[3] He resigned from the Council later that day.[3] The following day, Brown was charged with misdemeanor unlawful cash campaign expenditures for violating the District's election law that prohibits cash campaign expenditures in excess of $50.[20]

Election history[edit]

2004 Council of the District of Columbia, At Large, Democratic Primary Election[21]

Kwame R. Brown (D) 54%
Harold Brazil (D) 32%
Sam Brooks (D) 13%
Write-in 0%

2004 Council of the District of Columbia, At Large, General Election[22]

Kwame R. Brown (D) 55%
Carol Schwartz (R) 31%
Laurent Ross (STG) 8%
A.D. "Tony" Dominguez (I) 5%
Write-in 1%

2008 Council of the District of Columbia, At Large, Democratic Primary Election[23]

Kwame R. Brown (D) 100%

2008 Council of the District of Columbia, At Large, General Election[24]

Kwame R. Brown (D) 48%
Michael A. Brown (I) 20%
Write-in 11%
Patrick Mara (R) 10%

2010 Council of the District of Columbia, Chairperson, Democratic Primary Election[17]

Kwame R. Brown (D) 55%
Vincent B. Orange, Sr. (D) 39%
Dorothy Douglas (D) 6%

2010 Council of the District of Columbia, Chairperson, General Election[25]

Kwame R. Brown (D) 88%
Ann C. Wilcox (STG) 10%
Write-in 2%

Committees[edit]

  • Committee on Economic Development – Chairperson[26]
  • Committee on Government Operations and the Environment[27]
  • Committee on Libraries, Parks and Recreation[28]
  • Committee on Finance and Revenue[29]
  • Committee on Public Works and Transportation[30]
  • Special Committee on Statehood and Self-Determination[31]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Marimow, Ann E. (July 26, 2010). "Brown makes his play to be D.C. Council's captain". The Washington Post. 
  2. ^ "Kwame R. Brown". The Washington Post. 2005-01-06. p. DZ10. 
  3. ^ a b c Wilber, Del Quentin; Craig, Tim (June 6, 2012). "D.C. Council Chairman Kwame Brown resigns after he is charged with bank fraud". The Washington Post. 
  4. ^ http://www.kwamebrownatlarge.com
  5. ^ District of Columbia: Board of Elections and Ethics: Election Results
  6. ^ District of Columbia: Board of Elections and Ethics: Election Results
  7. ^ Stewart, Nikita. Local Election Season Quietly Kicks Off. The Washington Post. 2008-05-11.
  8. ^ Joint public hearing on Bill 16-250 "School Modernization Financing Act of 2005": Testimony of Natwar M. Gandhi, Chief Financial Officer, Government of the District of Columbia. Committee on Finance and Revenue and Committee on Education, Libraries and Recreation, Council of the District of Columbia. 2005-07-07.
  9. ^ Turner Construction Company Contract No. GAFM-2007-C-0215A Emergency Approval Resolution of 2007 (pdf). Council of the District of Columbia. 2007-06-05.
  10. ^ Haynes, V. Dion. At D.C.'s Phelps High, A Return to the Future. The Washington Post. 2008-05-11.
  11. ^ a b District of Columbia Creative Learning Program Act of 2008. Council of the District of Columbia.
  12. ^ a b Compliance and Enforcement Agency Establishment Act of 2007 (pdf). Government of the District of Columbia.
  13. ^ Small Business Commercial Property Tax Relief Act of 2007 Bill Status Page. Council of the District of Columbia. Retrieved 2008-06-09.
  14. ^ a b Small Business Commercial Property Tax Relief Act of 2007. Council of District of Columbia.
  15. ^ a b Minority and Women-Owned Business Assessment Act of 2007. Council of the District of Columbia.
  16. ^ Council Period 17 Committees. Council of the District of Columbia. Retrieved 2008-06-09.
  17. ^ a b Marimow, Ann E., and Kumar, Anita. Kwame Brown handily defeats Orange in primary contest for council chairman's spot. The Washington Post. 2010-09-15.
  18. ^ DeBonis, Mike (February 20, 2011). "'Fully loaded' SUV puts D.C. Council Chairman Kwame Brown on the spot". The Washington Post. 
  19. ^ http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2011/02/19/AR2011021904613.html?hpid=moreheadlines Gray and Brown’s SUVs Cost More Than Your Rent (Updated)
  20. ^ Wilber, Del Quentin; Craig, Tim (June 7, 2012). "Kwame Brown charged with misdemeanor count in 2008 campaign". The Washington Post. 
  21. ^ "Certified Results". District of Columbia Board of Elections and Ethics. 2004-09-14. 
  22. ^ "Certified Summary Results" (PDF). District of Columbia Board of Elections and Ethics. 2004-11-18. 
  23. ^ "Primary Election". DCist. 2008-09-09. 
  24. ^ "D.C. Council Elections Yield Victories for Kwame R. Brown, Lavon Williams". WJLA. 2004-11-18. 
  25. ^ "Certified Results", D.C. Board of Elections and Ethics Certified Results. 2010-11-19.
  26. ^ "Committee on Economic Development". Council of the District of Columbia. Retrieved March 4, 2010. 
  27. ^ "Committee on Government Operations and the Environment". Council of the District of Columbia. Retrieved March 4, 2010. 
  28. ^ "Committee on Libraries, Parks and Recreation". Council of the District of Columbia. Retrieved March 4, 2010. 
  29. ^ "Committee on Finance and Revenue". Council of the District of Columbia. Retrieved March 4, 2010. 
  30. ^ "Committee on Public Works and Transportation". Council of the District of Columbia. Retrieved March 4, 2010. 
  31. ^ "Special Committee on Statehood and Self-Determination". Council of the District of Columbia. Retrieved March 4, 2010. 

External links[edit]

Council of the District of Columbia
Preceded by
Harold Brazil
At-Large Member, Council of the District of Columbia
2005–2011
Succeeded by
Sekou Biddle
Preceded by
Vincent C. Gray
Chairman of the Council of the District of Columbia
2011–2012
Succeeded by
Phil Mendelson