LeRay Mansion

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LeRay Mansion
LeRay Mansion is located in New York
LeRay Mansion
Nearest city Black River, New York
Coordinates 44°3′0″N 75°45′48″W / 44.05000°N 75.76333°W / 44.05000; -75.76333Coordinates: 44°3′0″N 75°45′48″W / 44.05000°N 75.76333°W / 44.05000; -75.76333
Area 11.5 acres (4.7 ha)
Built 1808
Architect Beaudrey, Dr.
Architectural style Classical Revival
Governing body United States Army
NRHP Reference # 74001245[1]
Added to NRHP July 11, 1974

LeRay Mansion, also known as James LeRay Mansion Complex and Jules Payen Estate, is a historic home located northeast of the village of Black River in Jefferson County, New York. It is a Classical Revival style structure. It consists of a 47 foot by 54 foot main block flanked by two one story wings of 19 feet by 27 feet. The main block is believed to have been built in 1806-1808 and the wings added 1821-1823. It features an entrance portico supported by four Ionic columns.[2][3]

It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1974,[1] and has been described as "one of the most beautiful houses in America."[4]

The Mansion is located within the US Army's Fort Drum. According to the Fort Drum webpages, "The Mansion, servant's quarters, and farm manager's house are used for Visiting Officer's Quarters and are managed by the Directorate of Community Activities (DCA). The Mansion is also used by protocol for formal military events and celebrations. DCA has provided the Mansion with period appropriate furnishings. DCA and Cultural Resources work together for the preservation and appreciation of Fort Drum's most valued historic resource."[5]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places. National Park Service. 2009-03-13. 
  2. ^ CPT Charles R. Stroble (July 1973). "National Register of Historic Places Registration: LeRay Mansion". New York State Office of Parks, Recreation and Historic Preservation. Retrieved 2009-12-10.  See also: "Accompanying 19 photos". 
  3. ^ David Guldenzopf (undated). "National Register of Historic Places Registration: James LeRay Mansion Complex". New York State Office of Parks, Recreation and Historic Preservation. Retrieved 2009-12-10. 
  4. ^ Clarke, T. Wood (1941). "The Influence of the LeRay de Chaumont and of the Bonpartes in the Settlement of the North Country". Emigrés in the Wilderness. MacMillan. Retrieved 2010-05-16. 
  5. ^ "Cultural Resources". Fort Drum website. United States Army. Retrieved 2011-08-19.