List of Washington Redskins seasons

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For complete team history, see History of the Washington Redskins.
RFK Stadium was the home of the Redskins from 1961 to 1996.

This is a list of seasons completed by the Washington Redskins American football franchise of the National Football League (NFL). The list documents the season-by-season records of the Redskins' franchise from 1932 to present, including postseason records, and league awards for individual players or head coaches. The Redskins franchise was founded as the Boston Braves, named after the local baseball franchise.[1] The team changed their name to the Redskins in 1933 and moved to Washington, D.C. in 1937.[2]

The Redskins have played over one thousand games. In those games, the club won five professional American football championships including two NFL Championships and three Super Bowls. The franchise captured ten NFL divisional titles and six NFL conference championships.[3]

The Redskins won the 1937 and 1942 Championship games, as well as Super Bowl XVII, XXII, and XXVI. They also played in and lost the 1936, 1940, 1943, and 1945 Championship games, as well as Super Bowl VII and XVIII. They have made twenty-two postseason appearances, and have an overall postseason record of 23 wins and 17 losses. Only four teams have appeared in more Super Bowls than the Redskins: the Dallas Cowboys (eight), Pittsburgh Steelers (eight), Denver Broncos (six), and New England Patriots (seven); the Redskins' five appearances are tied with the San Francisco 49ers, Oakland Raiders, Miami Dolphins, New York Giants and Green Bay Packers.[4]

All of the Redskins' league titles were attained during two ten-year spans. From 1936 to 1945, the Redskins went to the NFL Championship six times, winning two of them.[5] The second period lasted between 1982 and 1991 where the Redskins appeared in the postseason seven times, captured four Conference titles, and won three Super Bowls out of four appearances.[5]

The Redskins have also experienced failure in their history. The most notable period of failure was from 1946 to 1970, during which the Redskins did not have a single postseason appearance.[6] During this period, the Redskins went without a single winning season between 1956 and 1968.[6] In 1961 season, the franchise posted their worst regular season record with a 1–12–1 showing.[6]

Seasons[edit]

  • Note: The Finish, Wins, Losses, and Ties columns list regular season results and exclude any postseason play. Italicized numbers mean that the records are subject to change each week due to regular season or postseason games being played.
NFL Champions (1920–1969) Super Bowl Champions (1970–present) Conference Champions Division Champions Wild Card Berth
Official NFL records as of the end of the 2012 NFL season.
Season Team League Conference Division Regular season Postseason Results Awards
Finish Wins Losses Ties
Boston Braves
1932 1932 NFL 4th 4 4 2
Boston Redskins
1933 1933 NFL East 3rd 5 5 2
1934 1934 NFL East 2nd 6 6 0
1935 1935 NFL East 4th 2 8 1
1936 1936 NFL East 1st 7 5 0 Lost NFL Championship (Packers) 21–6
Washington Redskins
1937 1937 NFL East 1st 8 3 0 Won NFL Championship (Bears) 28–21 (1)
1938 1938 NFL East 2nd 6 3 2
1939 1939 NFL East 2nd 8 2 1
1940 1940 NFL East 1st 9 2 0 Lost NFL Championship (Bears) 73–0
1941 1941 NFL East 3rd 6 5 0
1942 1942 NFL East 1st 10 1 0 Won NFL Championship (Bears) 14–6 (2)
1943 1943 NFL East 1st 6 3 1 Won Eastern Divisional Playoff (Giants) 28–0
Lost NFL Championship (Bears) 41–21
1944 1944 NFL East 3rd 6 3 1
1945 1945 NFL East 1st 8 2 0 Lost NFL Championship (Cleveland Rams) 15–14
1946 1946 NFL East T-3rd 5 5 1
1947 1947 NFL East 4th 4 8 0
1948 1948 NFL East 2nd 7 5 0
1949 1949 NFL East 4th 4 7 1
1950 1950 NFL American 6th 3 9 0
1951 1951 NFL American 3rd 5 7 0
1952 1952 NFL American T-5th 4 8 0
1953 1953 NFL Eastern 3rd 6 5 1
1954 1954 NFL Eastern 5th 3 9 0
1955 1955 NFL Eastern 2nd 8 4 0 Joe Kuharich (COY)
1956 1956 NFL Eastern 3rd 6 6 0
1957 1957 NFL Eastern 4th 5 6 1
1958 1958 NFL Eastern 4th 4 7 1
1959 1959 NFL Eastern 5th 3 9 0
1960 1960[7] NFL Eastern 6th 1 9 2
1961 1961[8] NFL Eastern 7th 1 12 1
1962 1962 NFL Eastern 4th 5 7 2
1963 1963 NFL Eastern 6th 3 11 0
1964 1964 NFL Eastern T-3rd 6 8 0 Charley Taylor (OROY)
1965 1965 NFL Eastern 4th 6 8 0
1966 1966 NFL Eastern 5th 7 7 0
1967[9] 1967 NFL Eastern Capitol 3rd 5 6 3
1968 1968 NFL Eastern Capitol 3rd 5 9 0
1969 1969 NFL Eastern Capitol 2nd 7 5 2
1970 1970 NFL NFC East 4th 6 8 0
1971 1971 NFL NFC East 2nd 9 4 1 Lost Divisional Playoffs (49ers) 24–20 George Allen (COY)
1972 1972 NFL NFC East 1st 11 3 0 Won Divisional Playoffs (Packers) 16–3
Won Conference Championship (Cowboys) 26–3
Lost Super Bowl VII (Dolphins) 14–7
Larry Brown (MVP, OPOY)
1973 1973 NFL NFC East 2nd[10] 10 4 0 Lost Divisional Playoffs (Vikings) 27–20
1974 1974 NFL NFC East 2nd 10 4 0 Lost Divisional Playoffs (Los Angeles Rams) 19–10
1975 1975 NFL NFC East 3rd 8 6 0 Mike Thomas (OROY)
1976 1976 NFL NFC East 2nd[11] 10 4 0 Lost Divisional Playoffs (Vikings) 35–20
1977 1977 NFL NFC East 2nd[12] 9 5 0
1978[13] 1978 NFL NFC East 3rd 8 8 0 John Riggins (CBPOY)
1979 1979 NFL NFC East 3rd[14] 10 6 0 Jack Pardee (COY)
1980 1980 NFL NFC East 3rd 6 10 0
1981 1981 NFL NFC East 4th 8 8 0
1982[15] 1982 NFL NFC 1st 8 1 0 Won First Round (Lions) 31–7
Won Second Round (Vikings) 21–7
Won Conference Championship (Cowboys) 31–17
Won Super Bowl XVII (Dolphins) 27–17 (3)
Joe Gibbs (COY)
Mark Moseley (MVP)
John Riggins (SB MVP)
Joe Theismann (WPMOY)
1983 1983 NFL NFC East 1st 14 2 0 Won Divisional Playoffs (Los Angeles Rams) 51–7
Won Conference Championship (49ers) 24–21
Lost Super Bowl XVIII (Raiders) 38–9
Joe Gibbs (COY)
Joe Theismann (MVP, OPOY)
1984 1984 NFL NFC East 1st 11 5 0 Lost Divisional Playoffs (Bears) 23–19
1985 1985 NFL NFC East 3rd[16] 10 6 0
1986 1986 NFL NFC East 2nd 12 4 0 Won Wild Card Playoffs (Los Angeles Rams) 19–7
Won Divisional Playoffs (Bears) 27–13
Lost Conference Championship (Giants) 17–0
1987[17] 1987 NFL NFC East 1st 11 4 0 Won Divisional Playoffs (Bears) 21–17
Won Conference Championship (Vikings) 17–10
Won Super Bowl XXII (Broncos) 42–10 (4)
Doug Williams (SB MVP)
1988 1988 NFL NFC East 3rd 7 9 0
1989 1989 NFL NFC East 3rd 10 6 0
1990 1990 NFL NFC East 3rd 10 6 0 Won Wild Card Playoffs (Eagles) 20–6
Lost Divisional Playoffs (49ers) 28–10
1991 1991 NFL NFC East 1st 14 2 0 Won Divisional Playoffs (Falcons) 24–7
Won Conference Championship (Lions) 41–10
Won Super Bowl XXVI (Bills) 37–24 (5)
Joe Gibbs (COY)
Mark Rypien (SB MVP)[18]
1992 1992 NFL NFC East 3rd[19] 9 7 0 Won Wild Card Playoffs (Vikings) 24–7
Lost Divisional Playoffs (49ers) 20–13
1993 1993 NFL NFC East 5th 4 12 0
1994 1994 NFL NFC East 5th 3 13 0
1995 1995 NFL NFC East 3rd 6 10 0
1996 1996[20] NFL NFC East 3rd[21] 9 7 0 Darrell Green (WPMOY)[22]
1997 1997[23] NFL NFC East 2nd 8 7 1
1998 1998 NFL NFC East 4th 6 10 0
1999 1999 NFL NFC East 1st 10 6 0 Won Wild Card Playoffs (Lions) 27–13
Lost Divisional Playoffs (Buccaneers) 14–13
2000 2000 NFL NFC East 3rd 8 8 0
2001 2001 NFL NFC East 2nd 8 8 0
2002 2002 NFL NFC East 3rd 7 9 0
2003 2003 NFL NFC East 3rd 5 11 0
2004 2004 NFL NFC East 4th 6 10 0
2005 2005 NFL NFC East 2nd 10 6 0 Won Wild Card Playoffs (Buccaneers) 17–10
Lost Divisional Playoffs (Seahawks) 20–10
2006 2006 NFL NFC East 4th 5 11 0
2007 2007 NFL NFC East 3rd 9 7 0 Lost Wild Card Playoffs (Seahawks) 35–14
2008 2008 NFL NFC East 4th 8 8 0
2009 2009 NFL NFC East 4th 4 12 0
2010 2010 NFL NFC East 4th 6 10 0
2011 2011 NFL NFC East 4th 5 11 0
2012 2012 NFL NFC East 1st 10 6 0 Lost Wild Card Playoffs (Seahawks) 24–14 Robert Griffin III (OROY)
2013 2013 NFL NFC East 4th 3 13 0
Total 565 546 27 (1932–2013, regular
season)
23 18 (including 2013 postseason)
588 564 27 (1932–2013 Totals;
5 NFL Championships)

Footnotes[edit]

  1. ^ "History: History by Decades". Washington Redskins. Retrieved 2007-12-11. 
  2. ^ "Washington Redskins (1937–present)". Sportsecyclopedia. Retrieved 2007-12-11. 
  3. ^ "Washington Redskins History". CBS Sports. Retrieved 2007-12-11. 
  4. ^ "NFL History". NFL History Network. Retrieved 2007-12-11. 
  5. ^ a b "Washington Redskins Championship History". NFLTeamHistory.com. Retrieved 2008-01-06. 
  6. ^ a b c "Washington Redskins History". CBS Sports. Retrieved 2008-01-06. 
  7. ^ The last year the Redskins played at Griffith Stadium.
  8. ^ The first year the Redskins played at D.C. Stadium (RFK).
  9. ^ The 1967 NFL season marks the first season in the league's history where the league was divided into two conferences which were subdivided into two divisions. Up to 1967, the league was either divided into two divisions, two conferences, or neither.
  10. ^ At the end of the 1973 season, the Redskins and the Cowboys finished the season with identical 10–4 records. Using the NFL's tie-breaking procedures, Dallas finished ahead of Washington in the NFC East based on better point differential in head-to-head games.
  11. ^ At the end of the 1976 season, the Redskins and the St. Louis Cardinals ended the season with identical 10–4 records. Using the NFL's tie-breaking procedures, Washington finished ahead of St. Louis based on head-to-head sweep.
  12. ^ At the end of the 1977 season, the Redskins and the Bears finished the season with identical 9–5 records. Using the NFL's tie-breaking procedures, Chicago finished ahead of Washington based on better net points in conference games.
  13. ^ For the 1978 season, the NFL expanded from a 14-game season to a 16-game season.
  14. ^ At the end of the 1979 season, the Redskins and the Bears finished the season with identical 10–6 records. Using the NFL's tie-breaking procedures, Chicago finished ahead of Washington based on better net points in all games.
  15. ^ The 1982 NFL season was shortened from 16 games per team to 9 games because of a players' strike. The NFL adopted a special 16-team playoff tournament; eight teams from each conference were seeded 1–8, and division standings were ignored.
  16. ^ At the end of the 1985 season, the Redskins, Cowboys, and the Giants finished the season with identical 10–6 records. Using the NFL's tie-breaking procedures, Dallas finished ahead of New York and Washington based on a better head-to-head record. New York then finished ahead of Washington and San Francisco in the Wild-Card race based on a better conference record.
  17. ^ The 1987 NFL season was shortened from 16 games per team to 15 games because of a players' strike. Games to be played during the third week of the season were canceled, and replacement players were used to play games from weeks 4 through 6.
  18. ^ "Super Bowl XXVI MVP". NFL.com. Retrieved 2008-01-18. 
  19. ^ At the end of the 1992 season, the Redskins and the Packers finished the season with identical 9–7 records. Using the NFL's tie-breaking procedures, Washington finished ahead of Green Bay based on a better conference record.
  20. ^ The last year the Redskins played at RFK Stadium.
  21. ^ At the end of the 1996 season, the Redskins and the Vikings finished the season with identical 9–7 records. Using the NFL's tie-breaking procedures, MInnesota finished ahead of Washington based on a better conference record.
  22. ^ George, Thomas (1997-05-18). "Once Too Small. Now Too Old? Never.". New York Times. Retrieved 2008-01-18. 
  23. ^ The first year the Redskins played at FedExField.

References[edit]