Mayor of Milan

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
  (Redirected from List of mayors of Milan)
Jump to: navigation, search
Mayor of Milan
Sindaco di Milano
CoA Città di Milano.svg
Pisapia, Giuliano - Manifestazione Piazza Scala a Milano - Foto Giovanni Dall'Orto, 27 giugno 2012 - 2.jpg
Incumbent
Giuliano Pisapia

since 1 June 2011
Style No courtesy, title or style
Appointer Electorate of Milan
Term length 5 years, renewable once
Inaugural holder Antonio Durini
Formation 8 November 1807
Deputy Ada Lucia De Cesaris
Salary €43,200
Website www.comune.milano.i

The Mayor of Milan (Italian: Sindaco di Milano) is an elected politician who, along with the Milan’s City Council of 48 members, is accountable for the strategic government of Milan in northern Italy. The title is the equivalent of Lord Mayor in the meaning of an actual executive leader.

Since 1 June 2011, Giuliano Pisapia is the Mayor of Milan. Previously, the position was held by Letizia Moratti from May 2006 until her succession by Pisapia.

Overview[edit]

Current seat of the Mayor, Palazzo Marino.

According to the Italian Constitution, the Mayor of Milan is member of the Milan's City Council. Although the title Mayor is not held by the heads of the nine boroughs of Milan, because they do not actually preside over self-governmental municipalities.

The Mayor is elected by the population of Milan. Citizens elect also the members of the City Council, which also controls Mayor's policy guidelines and is able to enforce his resignation by a motion of no confidence. The Mayor is entitled to appoint and release the members of his government.

Since 1993 the Mayor is elected directly by Milan's electorate: in all mayoral elections in Italy in cities with a population higher than 15,000 the voters express a direct choice for the mayor or an indirect choice voting for the party of the candidate's coalition. If no candidate receives at least 50% of votes, the top two candidates go to a second round after two weeks. The election of the City Council is based on a direct choice for the candidate with a preference vote: the candidate with the majority of the preferences is elected. The number of the seats for each party is determined proportionally.

The seat of the City Council is the city hall Palazzo Marino in Piazza della Scala.

List[edit]

Podestà[edit]

From 1807, Podestà di Milano were appointed by the kings who reigned over the city during the early- to mid-19th century: Napoleon, the Habsburgs and Victor Emmanuel II.

Mayors[edit]

In 1860 the Kingdom of Italy created the office of the Mayor of Milan (Sindaco di Milano), chosen by the City council.

Fascist Podestà[edit]

The Fascist dictatorship abolished mayors and City councils in 1926, replacing them with an authoritarian Podestà chosen by the National Fascist Party:

Democratic mayors[edit]

From 1945 to 1993, the Mayor of Milan was chosen by the City council.

# Name Start
year
End
year
Party Coalition Elections
13 Antonio Greppi April 27, 1945 June 25, 1951 Socialist Party PSI - DC - PCI 1946
14 Virgilio Ferrari June 25, 1951 January 21, 1961 Socialdemocratic Party DC - PSDI 1951, 1956
15 Gino Cassinis January 21, 1961 January 13, 1964 Socialdemocratic Party DC - PSDI - PSI 1960
16 Pietro Bucalossi February 17, 1964 November 16, 1967 Socialdemocratic Party DC - PSDI - PSI 1964
17 Aldo Aniasi November 16, 1967 May 12, 1976 Socialist Party DC - PSI - PSDI(1967–75)

PCI - PSI [1] (1975–76)

1970, 1975
18 Carlo Tognoli May 12, 1976 December 21, 1986 Socialist Party PCI - PSI 1980, 1985
19 Paolo Pillitteri December 21, 1986 January 18, 1992 Socialist Party DC - PSI (1986–87)
PSI - PCI - Greens (1987–92)
1990
20 Giampiero Borghini January 18, 1992 March 11, 1993 Socialist Party DC - PSI -

Elected mayors[edit]

Since 1993, under provisions of new local administration law, the Mayor of Milan is chosen by popular election, originally every four, and later every five years.


Mayor of Milan Took office Left office Party Coalition
21 CoA Città di Milano.svg Marco Formentini June 20, 1993 May 11, 1997 Lega Nord LN
June 20, 1993 – May 11, 1997
22 Gabriele Albertini.jpg Gabriele Albertini May 11, 1997 June 1, 2006 Forza Italia FI - AN - CCD
May 11, 1997 – June 1, 2001
FI - AN - UDC
June 1, 2001 – June 1, 2006
23 Moratti- Edward Hopper - Milano, Palazzo Reale.jpg Letizia Moratti June 1, 2006 June 1, 2011 Forza Italia then
People of Freedom
PDL - LN - UDC
June 1, 2006 - June 1, 2011
24 Giuliano Pisapia in Piazza Scala a Milano, 27 giugno 2012.jpg Giuliano Pisapia June 1, 2011 incumbent Left Ecology Freedom PD - SEL - PRC
since June 1, 2011

Timeline[edit]

Giuliano Pisapia Letizia Moratti Gabriele Albertini Marco Formentini Carlo Tognoli Aldo Aniasi

Elections[edit]

City Council election, 1946[edit]

The first democratic election after the fall of fascism took place on April 7, 1946.

After the defeat of the Nazis forces on April 25, 1945, Socialist politician Antonio Greppi had been appointed as Provisional Mayor by the National Liberation Committee under approval of the United Nations military government. When the authority of the Italian government was restored on January 1, 1946, local elections were called in Northern Italy.

Proportional representation and Westminster system were the principles chosen to restore municipal democracy in Italy. After the clear Socialist victory, Antonio Greppi was confirmed mayor by the new City Council, and an executive board of municipal unity was formed: the alliance between PSI, DC and PCI ruled Milan as it ruled Italy at time.

Parties Votes  % Seats
Italian Socialist Party 225,383 36.2 29
Christian Democracy 167,316 26.9 22
Italian Communist Party 155,140 24.9 20
National Democratic Union 45,864 7.3 6
Italian Republican Party-Action Party 19,168 3.1 2
Local Traders List 9,931 1.6 1
Total 622,702 100.0 80

Sunday, April 7, 1946. Sources: La Stampa , Unimi

City Council election, 1951[edit]

The second post-war election took place on May 27, 1951.

Political situation had deeply changed during the previous five years. A new social-democratic party had broken away from the Socialist Party, and the alliances of anti-fascist unity had ended both at national and at local level. The Communist Party had left the administration of Milan in 1949, as the remaining Socialist Party had moved to a position of abstention. Antonio Greppi had joined the Social-democratic group and formed a new alliance with the DC, the PLI and the PRI.

In 1951 Alcide De Gasperi's government changed the local electoral law to a block voting system, to ensure the leadership of its local administrations: two thirds of the seats would be ensured to the winning coalition, abolishing the proportional representation.

The national government coalition obtained an absolute majority with a 53% of suffrages, which was changed into a 66% of seats by the electoral law. However Greppi, who had unsuccessfully called for a coalition of Socialist unity between the PSDI and the PSI, was fired by the DC. Virgilio Ferrari, a Social-democratic activist, so became the new mayor.

Coalitions and parties Votes  % +/- Seats +/-
Government Coalition 412,246 53.2 N/A 53 Increase 9
Christian Democracy 238,693 30.8 Increase 3.9 30 Increase 8
Italian Democratic Socialist Party 111,185 14.3 N/A 15 Increase 1
Italian Liberal Party 49,299 6.4 Decrease 0.9 6 =
Italian Republican Party 13,069 1.7 Decrease 1.4 2 =
Popular Democratic Front 291,796 37.8 N/A 21 Decrease 15
Italian Communist Party 179,894 23.3 Decrease 1.6 13 Decrease 7
Italian Socialist Party 109,097 14.1 Decrease 22.1 8 Decrease 7
Others (civic list) 2,805 0.4 Decrease 1.2 = Decrease 1
Italian Social Movement 50,454 6.5 Increase 6.5 4 Increase 4
Monarchist National Party 23,956 3.0 Increase 3.0 2 Increase 2
Total 778,452 100.0 = 80 =

Sunday, May 27, 1951. Sources: La Stampa , Unimi

City Council election, 1956[edit]

The election took place on May 27, 1956.

For this election there was a different electoral law: after Alcide De Gasperi's government had retired in 1953 the 1951-electoral law based on a block voting system, the previous electoral law was restored.

Christian Democracy obtained the 30% of suffrages, while the Italian Socialist Party the 20% of the votes gaining 6% more than the 1951-election. Virgilio Ferrari was confirmed mayor by the majority of the City Council.

Parties Votes  % +/- Seats +/-
Christian Democracy 261,610 30.1 Decrease 0.7 25 Decrease 5
Italian Socialist Party 173,813 20.1 Increase 6.0 16 Increase 8
Italian Communist Party 158,818 18.3 Decrease 5.0 15 Increase 2
Italian Socialist Democratic Party 103,175 11.9 Decrease 2.4 10 Decrease 5
Italian Liberal Party 53,501 6.3 Decrease 0.1 5 Decrease 1
Italian Social Movement 50,827 5.9 Decrease 0.6 4 =
Monarchist National Party 35,171 4.1 Increase 1.1 3 Increase 1
Italian Republican Party 13,407 1.2 Decrease 0.5 = Decrease 2
Others (civc list) 15,721 2.0 Increase 1.6 2 Increase 2
Total 866,043 100.0 = 80 =

Sunday, May 27, 1956. Source: La Stampa

Mayoral and Council election, 1993[edit]

The election took place in two rounds: the first on June 6 and the second on June 20.

For the first time under the new electoral law citizens could vote directly the mayor; before this choice was made by the City Council. For the first time in the municipal political history there weren't parties like Christian Democracy, Italian Socialist Party or Italian Communist Party: the main parties were the newborn separatist Lega Nord and the Alliance of Progressives, composed by center-left parties.

The main candidates were Marco Formentini and Carlo Alberto Dalla Chiesa's son Nando. However there were a lot of others candidates from different parties.

On June 20, 1993, Formentini won the election and became the first elected mayor of Milan and the first mayor from a conservative party since 1946.

Milan Mayoral Election Results 1993
Name Party 1st Round
(June 6)
 % 2nd Round
(June 20)
 %
Marco Formentini Lega Nord 346,425 38.8 452,732 57.1
Nando Dalla Chiesa Alliance of Progressives 270,554 30.3 340,708 42.9

Mayoral and Council election, 1997[edit]

The election took place in two rounds: the first on April 27 and the second on May 11.

The main candidates were Gabriele Albertini, supported by Silvio Berlusconi's coalition Pole of Freedoms and by some Christian-democratic parties, and Aldo Fumagalli, supported by Romano Prodi's coalition The Olive Tree.

Milan Mayoral Election Results 1997
Name Party 1st Round
(April 27)
 % 2nd Round
(May 11)
 %
Gabriele Albertini Forza Italia 318,075 40.7 385,496 53.1
Aldo Fumagalli Democratic Party of the Left 214,733 27.5 339,942 46.9

Mayoral and Council election, 2001[edit]

The election took place on May 13, 2001.

The main candidates were the incumbent mayor Gabriele Albertini, supported by Silvio Berlusconi's center-right coalition, and Sandro Antoniazzi, supported by Francesco Rutelli's center-left coalition The Olive Tree.

Milan Mayoral Election Results 2001
Name Party 1st Round
(May 13)
 %
Gabriele Albertini Forza Italia 495,938 57.5
Sandro Antoniazzi Democrats of the Left 262,686 30.5

Mayoral and Council election, 2006[edit]

The election took place on May 29–30, 2006.

The main candidates were the incumbent Minister of Public Education Letizia Moratti and Bruno Ferrante, supported by Romano Prodi's center-left coalition The Olive Tree.

Letizia Moratti won the election on the first round with the 52% of the votes and became the first female mayor of Milan.

Milan Mayoral Election Results 2006
Name Party 1st Round
(May 29–30)
 %
Letizia Moratti Forza Italia 353,298 51.9
Bruno Ferrante Democrats of the Left 319,823 47.0
Giorgio Maria Carlo Ballabio Civic List "Your Milan" 1,329 0.2
Cesare Fracca Civic List "Living Milan" 1,169 0.2
Gabriele Pagliuzzi Liberal Right 1,187 0.1
Ambrogio Crespi Liberal Democrats 1,086 0.1
Valerio Colombo Humanist Party 752 0.1
Alberto Beniamino Saibene Civic List "This is a City" 676 0.1
Sante Gaiardoni Sante Gaiardoni List 523 0.1
Pietro Vangeli Communist List 392 0.1

Mayoral and Council election, 2011[edit]

The election took place in two rounds: the first on May 15–16 and the second on May 29–30.

The main candidates were the incumbent mayor Letizia Moratti, from Silvio Berlusconi's party People of Freedom, and the lawyer Giuliano Pisapia, from Left Ecology Freedom. Pisapia was chosen as the candidate for the center-left coalition on November 14, 2010 with the coalition primary elections.[2] On the contrary Letizia Moratti was confirmed by her party as the official candidate.

Letizia Moratti was supported by a big center-right coalition, composed by People of Freedom, Lega Nord and some 9 civic lists. Giuliano Pisapia was supported by Democratic Party, Left Ecology Freedom, Italy of Values, Communist Refoundation Party, Italian Radicals, Greens and some civic lists.

Pisapia won the second round and became the first elected mayor of Milan from a left-wing party. The candidate of Beppe Grillo's party Five Star Movement, Mattia Calise, who was only 20 years old, obtained near the 3.5% of the votes.


Milan Mayoral Election Results 2011 [3]
Name Party 1st Round
(May 15–16)
 % 2nd Round
(May 29–30)
 %
Giuliano Pisapia Left Ecology Freedom 315,862 48.0 365,657 55.1
Letizia Moratti People of Freedom 273,401 41.6 297,874 44.9
Manfredi Palmeri New Pole for Italy 36,471 5.54
Mattia Calise Five Star Movement 21,228 3.43
Giancarlo Pagliarini Lega Padana 4,229 0.64
Marco Mantovani Forza Nuova 2,366 0.35
Carla De Albertis Civic List "Your Milan" 1,804 0.27
Elisabetta Fatuzzo Pensioners' Party 1,613 0.24
Fabrizio Montuori Workers' Communist Party 405 0.06
Milan Council Election 2011 - Parties [4]
Coalition votes  % seats Party votes  % seats
Center-left (Pisapia) 281,494 47.6 29 Democratic Party
Left Ecology Freedom
Communist Refoundation Party
Italy of Values
Italian Radicals
Greens
Civic Lists (2)
170,551
28,016
18,467
15,145
10,215
8,165
30,935
28.6
4.7
3.1
2.5
1.7
1.4
5.1
20
3
2
1
1
-
2
Center-right (Moratti) 257,777 43.3 16 People of Freedom
Lega Nord
The Right
New Italian Socialist Party
Civic Lists (8)
171,222
57,403
1,721
1,029
26,402
28.7
9.6
0.3
0.2
4.4
11
4
-
-
1

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Landoni, Enrico. "1975 La nascita della prima giunta di sinistra a Milano". Arcipelago Milano. 
  2. ^ [1]
  3. ^ [2]
  4. ^ [3] Italian Ministry of the Interior - 2011.