Logan Medal of the Arts

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See also the Logan Medal of the Geological Association of Canada.

The Logan Medal of the Arts was an arts prize initiated in 1907 and associated with the Art Institute of Chicago, the Frank G Logan family and the Society for Sanity in Art. From 1917 through 1940, 270 awards were given for contributions to American art.

The Medal was named for arts patron Frank Granger Logan, founder of the brokerage house of Logan & Bryan, who served over 50 years on the board of the Chicago Art Institute. He and his wife, Josephine Hancock Logan, administered the award consistent with their patronage of the Society for Sanity in Art, which they founded in 1936, and the theme of her 1937 book Sanity in Art. The Logans strongly opposed all forms of modern art, including cubism, surrealism, and abstract expressionism. It was not unknown for the Society of Sanity in Art to award a prize (e.g. in 1938 to Rudolph Ingerle) in competition with the official award by the exhibition prize committee of a prize the Logans had already sponsored.

The Logans sponsored several prizes in their name. The Mr and Mrs Frank G Logan prize was awarded to a jury selected exhibit at the American Paintings and Sculpture Exhibitions held in Chicago and a similarly named prize was awarded to a local artist at the annual Chicago and Vicinity Exhibition for a selected exhibit. Frank G Logan prizes were also awarded at exhibitions of prints by the Chicago Society of Etchers, the annual International Watercolor Exhibition and the annual International Lithography and Wood Engraving Exhibition, all held at the Chicago Art Institute. Recipients of these prizes are listed below.

Recipients[edit]

Logan Medal of the Arts[edit]

This is an incomplete list, please help us by updating it.

Mr and Mrs Frank G. Logan prize ($1000-$1500)[edit]

Formerly awarded at the annual American Paintings and Sculpture Exhibition, Chicago
Source:Art Institute of Chicago

Mr and Mrs Frank G. Logan Medal ($2500)[edit]

Formerly awarded at the annual American Paintings and Sculpture Exhibition, Chicago
Source:Art Institute of Chicago

Mr and Mrs Frank G. Logan Art Institute Medal ($500-$2000)[edit]

Awarded at the annual American Paintings and Sculpture Exhibition, Chicago
Source:Art Institute of Chicago

Mr and Mrs Frank G. Logan Art Institute Prize ($500-$2000)[edit]

Awarded at the Chicago and Vicinity annual exhibition
Source:Art Institute of Chicago

Frank G Logan Prize[edit]

Awarded at the Chicago Society of Etchers exhibition

References[edit]

  1. ^ Bulletin of the Art Institute of Chicago, Volumes 1-12, pg. 263, available online via Google Books
  2. ^ http://www.ifpda.org/content/node/2457
  3. ^ a b "FRANK WESTON BENSON (1862-1951)PAPERS, 1864-1976" (PDF). Peabody Essex Museum. Retrieved 3 February 2015. 
  4. ^ Charles S. Hopkinson Virtual Gallery
  5. ^ Castagno, John. Jewish Artists: Signatures and Monograms. p. 467. 
  6. ^ http://www.artic.edu/sites/default/files/libraries/pubs/1932/AIC1932IntWtrclr12thAn_comb.pdf
  7. ^ "Art: East, West, South". Time. March 28, 1938. 
  8. ^ "Rudolph Ingerle (1879–1950)". M Christine Schwartz Collection. Retrieved March 25, 1940.  Check date values in: |accessdate= (help)
  9. ^ "FRANK TOLLES CHAMBERLIN (1873-1961)". Sullivan Goss. Retrieved 5 February 2015. 
  10. ^ "Art: Academic Art". Time. Retrieved March 25, 1940.  Check date values in: |accessdate= (help)
  11. ^ "Anna Wilson, "Mrs. Webster" (1936) SOLD P924". Early Californian Antiques. Retrieved 5 February 2015. 
  12. ^ "Edward Bruce Douglas". State Historical Society of Iowa. Retrieved 5 February 2015. 
  13. ^ "Frank M. Moore (1877-1967)". George Stern Fine Arts. Retrieved 5 February 2015. 
  14. ^ a b c d e "38th Annual Exhibition" (PDF). Art Institute of Chicago. Retrieved 3 February 2015. 
  15. ^ "Art: In Chicago". Time. November 10, 1924. 
  16. ^ "Art: In Chicago". Time. November 9, 1925. 
  17. ^ "Heinz Warneke". Langs de Wal. Retrieved 2 February 2015. 
  18. ^ "Art: Chicago's Prizes". Time. November 9, 1931. 
  19. ^ "Art: Sinking Hearts". Time. November 18, 1935. 
  20. ^ "Art: Proletarian Gloom". Time. November 4, 1935. 
  21. ^ Hayes, Patrick J. The Making of Modern Immigration: An Encyclopedia of People and Ideas. p. 294. 
  22. ^ "Seated Figure". Wikiart. Retrieved 2 February 2015. 
  23. ^ "61st Annual Exhibition" (PDF). Art Institute of Chicago. Retrieved 3 February 2015. 
  24. ^ "Biographical Chronology". Retrieved 4 February 2015. 
  25. ^ "MARK DI SUVERO" (PDF). Retrieved 3 February 2015. 
  26. ^ "Stuart Davis". artnet. Retrieved 4 February 2015. 
  27. ^ Castagno, John. Jewish Artists: Signatures and Monograms. p. 201. 
  28. ^ "George Segal, American, 1924-2000". Chicago Art Institute. Retrieved 4 February 2015. 
  29. ^ "Modern and Contemporary Art". Art Institute of Chicago. Retrieved 4 February 2015. 
  30. ^ "AWARDS, ELECTIONS, AND HONORS". Rauschenberg Foundation. Retrieved 7 February 2015. 
  31. ^ a b c "25th Annual Exhibition" (PDF). Art Institute of Chicago. Retrieved 3 February 2015. 
  32. ^ Frank V. Dudley biography
  33. ^ "Chicago Tribune". 30 April 1964. p. 43. 
  34. ^ "75th Exhibition" (PDF). Art Institute of Chicago. Retrieved 4 February 2015. 
  35. ^ "Selected Chronology for Edward Hopper (1882–1967)". Art Institute of Chicago. Retrieved 22 February 2015. 

Sources[edit]

  • Rudolph Ingerle (1879-1950): Paintings of the Ozarks, the Great Smoky Mountains and the 1933 Century of progress Exposition (Chicago: Aaron Galleries, 2000)

External links[edit]