Louis Miriani

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Louis Miriani
Louis Miriani Mayor of Detroit.jpg
63rd Mayor of Detroit, Michigan
In office
September 12, 1957 – January 2, 1962
Preceded by Albert E. Cobo
Succeeded by Jerome Cavanagh
Personal details
Born January 1, 1897
Died October 18, 1987(1987-10-18) (aged 90)
Pontiac, Michigan
Political party Republican

Louis C. Miriani (January 1, 1897 – October 18, 1987) was an American politician who served as mayor of Detroit, Michigan (1957–62). He was the last Republican mayor of Detroit.

Biography[edit]

Miriani, graduated from the University of Detroit Law School.[1] He was chief counsel and later director of the Detroit Legal Aid Bureau.[1] He was elected to the Detroit City Council in 1947, and was council president from 1949–1957.[2] He became Mayor in 1957 after the death of Albert Cobo,[3] and was elected in his own right shortly afterward by a 6:1 margin over his opponent.[4] He served until 1961, when he was defeated for reelection by Jerome Cavanagh in an upset fueled largely by African-American support for Cavanagh.[5] Under his administration, Detroit's Cobo Hall and other parts of the Civic Center were completed, and the city's infrastructure was expanded.[1] Miriani was again elected to the City Council in 1965.[1]

In 1969, Miriani was convicted of federal tax evasion and served approximately 10 months in prison.[1] He retired from politics after his conviction.[1]

He died after a long illness on October 18, 1987 in Pontiac, Michigan.[1]

Political offices
Preceded by
Albert E. Cobo
Mayor of Detroit
September 12, 1957 – January 2, 1962
Succeeded by
Jerome Cavanagh

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g "Louis C. Miriani, 90, Former Detroit Mayor". New York Times. October 21, 1987. 
  2. ^ "Detroit City Council, 1919 to present". Detroit Public Library. Retrieved November 6, 2010. 
  3. ^ "Detroit's Mayor Cobo, 63, Dies of Heart Attack". Ludington Daily News. Sep 13, 1957. 
  4. ^ "Detroit Elects First Negro". Ludington Daily News. Nov 5, 1957. 
  5. ^ Joseph Turrini (Nov–Dec 1999). "Phooie on Louie: African American Detroit and the Election of Jerry Cavanagh". Michigan History.