Martin Ransohoff

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Martin Ransohoff
Born (1926-11-30) November 30, 1926 (age 87)
New Orleans, Louisiana
Occupation Film producer

Martin Ransohoff (born November 30, 1926)[1] is a cinema and television producer,[2] and member of the Ransohoff family.

Ransohoff was born in New Orleans, Louisiana in 1926. He founded the film production company Filmways, Inc. in 1960 and remained with the company until 1972.[3] Filmways started making TV commercials, moved into documentaries then sitcoms; by 1963 Filmways were making $13 million a year.[4] In 1972 he became an independent producer.[5]

He attempted to "create" female movie stars during the 1960s; the actresses who achieved the greatest success under his tutelage were Ann-Margret, Tuesday Weld and Sharon Tate, who featured in several of his films from 1964 until her death in 1969. He is a cousin of neurosurgeon Joseph Ransohoff.

He graduated from Colgate University in 1949 and is on a list of Distinguished Alumni.

The Beverly Hillbillies brought Ransohoff his first success in 1962 and thereafter he turned his attention to films. Ransohoff went on to produce such films as American Pop.[6]

Ransohoff is vividly described and featured in a chapter of screenwriter Joe Eszterhas's memoir, Hollywood Animal, about the making of the film Jagged Edge.[citation needed]

Selected filmography[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Martin Ransohoff". Yahoo! TV. 
  2. ^ "Martin Ransohoff". The New York Times. 
  3. ^ Radio and Television Martin Ransohoff Knows His Market By Lawrence Laurent. The Washington Post, Times Herald (1959-1973) [Washington, D.C] 19 Jan 1966: C5.
  4. ^ Martin Ransohoff Expands Program: Success in TV Encourages $10 Million Movie Gamble Scheuer, Philip K. Los Angeles Times (1923-Current File) [Los Angeles, Calif] 18 Feb 1963: C11.
  5. ^ Filmways' Ransohoff Quits As President and Director Wall Street Journal (1923 - Current file) [New York, N.Y] 08 Sep 1972: 25.
  6. ^ Canby, Vincent (February 13, 1981). "'American Pop' Grown-Up Animation". The New York Times. 

External links[edit]