Maung Aye

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Maung Aye
မောင်အေး
MaungAye.jpg
Vice Chairman of the State Peace and Development Council
In office
July 1993 – 30 March 2011
Chairman Than Shwe
Preceded by Than Shwe
Succeeded by Tin Aung Myint Oo and Sai Mauk Kham (Vice President)
Deputy Commander-in-Chief of the Armed Forces of Myanmar
In office
July 1993 – 30 March 2011
Preceded by General Than Shwe
Succeeded by Vice-Senior General Soe Win
Personal details
Born (1937-12-25) 25 December 1937 (age 76)
Syriam, British Burma[1]
Nationality Burmese
Political party SPDC (military Dictatorship)
Spouse(s) Mya Mya San[2]
Children Nandar Aye[3]
Alma mater Defence Services Academy
Religion Theravada Buddhism
Military service
Service/branch Myanmar Army
Years of service 1959-2011
Rank Vice-Senior General

Vice-Senior General Maung Aye (Burmese: မောင်အေး [màʊɴ ʔé]; born 25 December 1937) is a Burmese military figure who was Vice Chairman of the State Peace and Development Council (SPDC), the ruling military junta of Burma, from 1993 to 2011. Maung Aye was the second highest-ranking member of the SPDC.

Career[edit]

Maung Aye graduated from the Defence Services Academy in Pyin U Lwin with a Bachelor of Science degree in 1959. In 1968, he became commander of the Northeast Region. In 1988, he became commander of the Eastern Region. Two years later he was promoted to major-general. In 1992 he was made Army Chief. In 1993 he was named Lieutenant General and the Deputy Commander in Chief of Defense Services. In 1994 he was appointed Deputy Chairman of SLORC, and subsequently held the same position in the SPDC.

Maung Aye and Senior General Than Shwe, along with six other top military officers, were reported to have resigned their military posts on 27 August 2010. He reportedly transferred the deputy commander-in-chief post to Lt-Gen Ko Ko, head of Chief of Bureau of Special Operation-3, but remains the country's deputy head of state.[4] The rumours were later proven false.[5]

Personal[edit]

He is married to Mya Mya San and has one daughter, Nandar Aye.[6]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "General Maung Aye". Mizzima Election 2010. Mizzima News. 1 April 2010. Retrieved 20 August 2011. 
  2. ^ "Maung Aye". Alternative Asean Network on Burma. Retrieved 2008-07-02. 
  3. ^ http://www.irrawaddymedia.com/article.php?art_id=18597
  4. ^ "Junta Chiefs Resign in Military Reshuffle". The Irrawaddy News. 2010-08-27. 
  5. ^ Moe, Wai (2010-10-18). "Generals Unhappy About Retirement". The Irrawaddy. Retrieved 2010-10-25. 
  6. ^ http://www.hm-treasury.gov.uk/d/burma.htm