Me and the Big Guy

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Me and the Big Guy
Directed by Matt Nix
Produced by Matt Nix
Max Stubblefield
Written by Matt Nix
Starring Michael Naughton
Dan Kern
James Jacobus
Music by John Ballinger
John Dickson (song "A Friend Like Me")
Cinematography Russ Lyster
Edited by Julian Gomez
Distributed by Flying Glass of Milk Productions
Release dates
1999
Running time
10 mins
Country USA
Language English

Me and the Big Guy is a 1999 short film that parodies Nineteen Eighty-Four by way of lampooning the fact that Big Brother is watching everyone, even those he'd rather not.

Plot[edit]

Directed and written by Matt Nix, this short film follows the life of unnervingly happy-go-lucky Citizen 43275-B (played by Michael Naughton), who despite the oppressive totalitarian regime and Thought Police looks ever forward to returning home and telling 'The Big Guy' (played by Dan Kern) on the telescreen about his work-day.

In much the same manner as an imaginary friend acts, 'The Big Guy' never responds until he finally becomes fed up with Citizen 43275-B and declares that he does not like being called 'The Big Guy' - but this intervention serves only to worsen Big Brother's predicament, as 43275-B enthusiastically hugs the telescreen and goes on to "amuse" him through a variety of ways: sock puppets, Boggle, hide and seek, one-sided pillow fights, and knock-knock jokes.

As this further frustrates him, Big Brother finally announces the true nature of himself and society by telling 43275-B:

Big Brother eventually shuts off the telescreen in disgust and frustration. After several minutes, Citizen 43275-B realizes that the telescreen is not coming back on. He then retrieves a hidden cache of a notebook, pen and reading glasses, and begins to write his own guide to revolution. The appearance in the opening scenes of a volume entitled "RE-EDUCATION MANUAL" on 43275-B's bookshelf, references to a "re-education lectures," and the fact that he has a diary already set aside, all imply that this is not his first attempt, and suggests his behavior was deliberate.

Similarities with other stories[edit]

Nineteen Eighty-Four[edit]

Besides the obvious telescreen and Big Brother of Nineteen Eighty-Four, there are some other references. 43275-B gets chocolate rations, the intercom says the flour ration was lowered by 9% (as the book says the ration was lowered), two members of the thought police arrest 43275-B's neighbour, a loudspeaker announces the executions of 30 political prisoners and 43275-B keeps a journal like Winston Smith does.

We[edit]

We, the satirical novel by Yevgeny Zamyatin that provided much of the inspiration for Nineteen Eighty-Four, features a narrator, "D-503", who through much of the story truly believes in the virtue of his utterly regimented, totalitarian state. Much of the comic tension derives from D-503's horror at his own emerging desire to shatter the order of the "perfect" society which is the only world he has ever known.

Cast[edit]

  • Citizen 43275-B - Mike Naughton
  • Big Brother - Dan Keon
  • Stormtrooper #1 - James Jacobus
  • Stormtrooper #2 - Sterling Wolfe
  • Neighbor - Tom Wheatley
  • Voice - Esmé Nix

External links[edit]