Meard Street

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Coordinates: 51°30′48″N 0°07′59″W / 51.5133°N 0.133°W / 51.5133; -0.133

Houses in Meard Street

Meard Street is a street in Soho, London. It runs roughly East-West (properly, East-Northeast to West-Southwest, as elsewhere in Soho), between Wardour Street to the west and Dean Street to the east. It is in two sections, with a slight bend in the middle: the west half is pedestrianised, while the east half is a narrow single lane road.

The street is named for John Meard, the younger, a carpenter, later esquire, who developed it in the 1720s and 1730s.[1]

It is prominently featured in photographs and postcards for the tourist trade, due to the pun with French: merde and Italian: merda ("shit").

History[edit]

The two halves occupy what were originally two separate, non-communicating 17th century courts. They were developed in two halves: the western half, Meard's Court, in 1722, and the eastern half, Dean's Court (opening off Dean Street, and renamed Meard Street) in 1731/32. As part of the redevelopment of Dean's Court, the two halves were joined in 1732/33.[1]

Notable occupants[edit]

Sign at the entrance to the home of Sebastian Horsley

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b (Sheppard 1966)
  2. ^ Debriefer: The Crucifixated Sebastian Horsley, November 23, 2007 
  3. ^ Sebastian Horsley (March 23, 2007), (blog post of March 23, 2007)