Men's high jump world record progression

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The first world record in the men's high jump was recognised by the International Association of Athletics Federations in 1912.

As of June, 2009, the IAAF has ratified 40 world records in the event.[1]

Note that almost all records up to and including 1960 were set in the US, and hence measured in feet and inches. In the table below, the feet and inches have been obtained by converting the metric value of the record, which may already have been rounded down in the process of converting feet and inches to metric. As a result, the record in feet and inches sometimes understates the original measurement. For example, George Horine's record was actually 6 feet 7 inches (approximately 2.0066 metres), Edward Beeson's record was actually 6 feet 7⅝ inches, and the record of Cornelius Johnson and Dave Albritton was actually 6 feet 9¾ inches.

Progression[edit]

Javier Sotomayor Patrik Sjöberg Igor Paklin Rudolf Povarnitsyn Zhu Jianhua Gert Wessig Dietmar Mögenburg Jacek Wszola Vladimir Yashchenko Dwight Stone Pat Matzdorf Valeriy Brumel John Thomas (Athlete) Charles Dumas Walt Davis Dave Albritton Cornelius Johnson (athlete) Walter Marty Harold Osborne Edward Beeson George Horine

Height Athlete Venue Date
2.00 m (6 ft 6 34 in)  George Horine (USA) Palo Alto, California 18 May 1912[1]
2.02 m (6 ft 7 12 in)  Edward Beeson (USA) Berkeley, California 2 May 1914[1]
2.03 m (6 ft 8 in)  Harold Osborn (USA) Urbana, Illinois 27 May 1924[1]
2.04 m (6 ft 8 14 in)  Walter Marty (USA) Fresno, California 13 May 1933[1]
2.06 m (6 ft 9 in)  Walter Marty (USA) Palo Alto, California 28 April 1934[1]
2.07 m (6 ft 9 12 in)  Cornelius Johnson (USA) New York 12 July 1936[1]
2.07 m (6 ft 9 12 in)  Dave Albritton (USA) New York 12 July 1936[1]
2.09 m (6 ft 10 14 in)  Melvin Walker (USA) Malmö, Sweden 12 August 1937[1]
2.11 m (6 ft 11 in)  Lester Steers (USA) Los Angeles 17 June 1941[1]
2.12 m (6 ft 11 12 in)  Walt Davis (USA) Dayton, Ohio 27 June 1953[1]
2.15 m (7 ft 34 in)  Charles Dumas (USA) Los Angeles 29 June 1956[1]
2.16 m (7 ft 1 in)  Yuriy Stepanov (URS) Leningrad, Soviet Union 13 July 1957[1]
2.17 m (7 ft 1 12 in)  John Thomas (USA) Philadelphia 30 April 1960[1]
2.17 m (7 ft 1 12 in)  John Thomas (USA) Cambridge, Massachusetts 21 May 1960[1]
2.18 m (7 ft 1 34 in)  John Thomas (USA) Bakersfield, California 24 June 1960[1]
2.22 m (7 ft 3 12 in)  John Thomas (USA) Palo Alto, California 1 July 1960[1]
2.23 m (7 ft 3 34 in)  Valeriy Brumel (URS) Moscow 18 June 1961[1]
2.24 m (7 ft 4 14 in)  Valeriy Brumel (URS) Moscow 16 July 1961[1]
2.25 m (7 ft 4 12 in)  Valeriy Brumel (URS) Sofia, Bulgaria 31 August 1961[1]
2.26 m (7 ft 5 in)  Valeriy Brumel (URS) Palo Alto, California 22 July 1962[1]
2.27 m (7 ft 5 14 in)  Valeriy Brumel (URS) Moscow 29 September 1962[1]
2.28 m (7 ft 5 34 in)  Valeriy Brumel (URS) Moscow 21 July 1963[1]
2.29 m (7 ft 6 14 in)  Pat Matzdorf (USA) Berkeley, California 3 July 1971[1]
2.30 m (7 ft 6 12 in)  Dwight Stones (USA) Munich 11 July 1973[1]
2.31 m (7 ft 7 in)  Dwight Stones (USA) Philadelphia 5 June 1976[1]
2.32 m (7 ft 7 14 in)  Dwight Stones (USA) Philadelphia 4 August 1976[1]
2.33 m (7 ft 7 34 in)  Vladimir Yashchenko (URS) Richmond, Virginia 2 June 1977[1]
2.34 m (7 ft 8 14 in)  Vladimir Yashchenko (URS) Tbilisi, Soviet Union 16 June 1978[1]
2.35 m (7 ft 8 12 in)  Jacek Wszoła (POL) Eberstadt, West Germany 25 May 1980[1]
2.35 m (7 ft 8 12 in)  Dietmar Mögenburg (FRG) Rehlingen, West Germany 26 May 1980[1]
2.36 m (7 ft 9 in)  Gerd Wessig (GDR) Moscow 1 August 1980[1]
2.37 m (7 ft 9 14 in)  Zhu Jianhua (CHN) Beijing 11 June 1983[1]
2.38 m (7 ft 9 34 in)  Zhu Jianhua (CHN) Shanghai 22 September 1983[1]
2.39 m (7 ft 10 in)  Zhu Jianhua (CHN) Eberstadt, West Germany 10 June 1984[1]
2.40 m (7 ft 10 12 in)  Rudolf Povarnitsyn (URS) Donetsk, Soviet Union 11 August 1985[1]
2.41 m (7 ft 11 in)  Igor Paklin (URS) Kobe, Japan 4 September 1985[1]
2.42 m (7 ft 11 14 in)  Patrik Sjöberg (SWE) Stockholm, Sweden 30 June 1987[1]
2.43 m (7 ft 11 34 in)  Javier Sotomayor (CUB) Salamanca, Spain 8 September 1988[1]
2.44 m (8 ft 0 in)  Javier Sotomayor (CUB) San Juan, Puerto Rico 29 July 1989[1]
2.45 m (8 ft 12 in)  Javier Sotomayor (CUB) Salamanca, Spain 27 July 1993[1]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac ad ae af ag ah ai aj ak al am an ao "12th IAAF World Championships In Athletics: IAAF Statistics Handbook. Berlin 2009." (pdf). Monte Carlo: IAAF Media & Public Relations Department. 2009. pp. 554–55. Archived from the original on November 23, 2012. Retrieved March 8, 2013.