Modal share

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A modal share (also called mode split, mode-share, or modal split) is the percentage of travelers using a particular type of transportation or number of trips using said type.[1] In freight transportation, this may be measured in mass.

Modal share is an important component in developing sustainable transport within a city or region. In recent years, many cities have set modal share targets for balanced and sustainable transport modes, particularly 30% of non-motorized (cycling and walking) and 30% of public transport. These goals reflect a desire for a modal shift, or a change between modes, and usually encompasses an increase in the proportion of trips made using sustainable modes.[2]

Comparability of data[edit]

Modal share data is usually obtained by travel surveys, which are often conducted by local governments, using different methodologies. Sampling and interviewing techniques, definitions, the extent of geographical areas and other methodological differences can influence comparability. Most typical surveys refer to the main mode of transport used during trips to work.[3]

Modal split of journeys to work[edit]

The following tables present the modal split of journeys to work.

Cities with over 1,000,000 inhabitants[edit]

City walking cycling public transport private motor vehicle year
Australia Adelaide 3% 1% 10% 86% 2006
New Zealand Auckland 3% 1% 6% 89% 2009-2012 [4]
Spain Barcelona 35% 12% 33% 20% 2012[5]
China Beijing 21% 32% 26% 21% 2005/2011[5]
Germany Berlin 30% 13% 26% 31% 2008
Australia Brisbane 4% 1% 14% 81% 2006
Belgium Brussels 25% 2.5% 28% 43% 2010[6]
Colombia Bogota 15% 2% 64% 19% 2008[5]
United States Boston 14% 2% 35% 45% 2009
Hungary Budapest 22% 2% 30% 46% 2004
United States Chicago 6% 1% 27% 61% 2009
United States Dallas 2% 0% 4% 89% 2009
South Korea Daejeon 26% 2% 28% 44% 2012[7]
India Delhi 21% 12% 48% 19% 2008/2011[5]
Germany Hamburg 28% 12% 18% 42% 2008[8]
United States Houston 2% 0% 4% 88% 2009
United States Indianapolis 2% 1% 2% 92% 2009
United States Las Vegas 3% 0% 3% 89% 2009
United Kingdom London 21% 2% 44% 34% 2011[9]
United States Los Angeles 3% 1% 11% 78% 2009
Spain Madrid 36% 0% 34% 30% 2006[5]
Australia Melbourne 4% 2% 14% 80% 2012
India Mumbai 27% 6% 52% 15% 2008/2011[5]
Germany Munich 28% 17% 21% 37% 2011
United States New York City 10% 1% 55% 29% 2009
Japan Osaka 27% 0% 34% 39% 2000[5]
France Paris 61% 3% 27% 9% 2010[10]
Australia Perth 3% 1% 10% 86% 2006
United States Philadelphia 9% 2% 25% 60% 2009
United States Phoenix 2% 1% 3% 88% 2009
United States Portland 6% 6% 12% 70% 2009
Czech Republic Prague 23% 1% 43% 33% 2009[11]
Italy Rome 7% 0% 24% 68% 2001
United States San Antonio 2% 0% 3% 90% 2009
United States San Diego 3% 1% 4% 85% 2009
United States San Francisco 10% 3% 32% 46% 2009
United States San Jose 2% 1% 3% 89% 2009
United States Seattle 8% 3% 20% 63% 2009
China Shanghai 27% 20% 33% 20% 2009/2011[5]
Singapore Singapore 22% 1% 44% 33% 2011[5]
Australia Sydney 5% 1% 21% 74% 2006
Taiwan Taipei 15% 4% 33% 48% 2009/2010[5]
Japan Tokyo 23% 14% 51% 12% 2008/2009[5]
Canada Toronto 7% 2% 34% 56% 2006[12]
Austria Vienna 28% 6% 39% 27% 2012[13]
Poland Warsaw 5% 1% 60% 34% 2009[14]
United States Washington, D.C. 11% 2% 37% 43% 2009

Cities with over 250,000 inhabitants[edit]

City walking cycling public transport private motor vehicle year
Denmark Aarhus 7% 27% 19% 43% 2004
Spain Alicante 18% 0% 13% 69% 2004
Netherlands Amsterdam 4% 38% 30% 28% 2010
Italy Bari 13% 1% 14% 72% 2001
Switzerland Bern 11% 11% 54% 24% 2001
Spain Bilbao 23% 0% 34% 43% 2004
United Kingdom Birmingham 1% 1% 25% 66% 2001
Italy Bologna 8% 4% 21% 67% 2001
Germany Bonn 9% 13% 21% 57% 2004
Slovakia Bratislava 4% 0% 70% 26% 2004
Germany Bremen 7% 19% 24% 50% 2004
United Kingdom Bristol 19% 8% 12% 55% 2011 [15]
Australia Canberra 5% 2% 8% 85% 2006
New Zealand Christchurch 6% 8% 9% 78% 2009-2012 [4]
Germany Cologne 8% 9% 27% 56% 2004
Denmark Copenhagen 10% 26% 36% 28% 2012
Spain Córdoba 18% 1% 10% 71% 2004
Germany Dortmund 7% 3% 23% 67% 2004
Germany Dresden 24% 17% 21% 38% 2008
Germany Düsseldorf 11% 5% 31% 53% 2004
Netherlands Eindhoven 3% 24% 8% 65% 2004
Germany Essen 9% 2% 20% 69% 2004
Italy Florence 8% 4% 21% 69% 2001
Germany Frankfurt 11% 7% 39% 43% 2004
Germany Freiburg im Breisgau 11% 13% 12% 63% 2004
Spain Gijón 24% 0% 17% 59% 2004
Sweden Göteborg 12% 14% 21% 52% 2004
Germany Hanover 9% 13% 29% 49% 2004
Finland Helsinki 12% 6% 40% 41% 2004
Spain Las Palmas 12% 0% 24% 64% 2004
Portugal Lisbon 10% 0% 46% 40% 2001
Spain Málaga 12% 0% 11% 77% 2004
Sweden Malmö 6% 25% 18% 51% 2011
Spain Murcia 18% 1% 7% 74% 2004
Italy Naples 13% 0% 26% 60% 2001
Germany Nuremberg 11% 7% 30% 52% 2004
Canada Ottawa 10% 2% 14% 72% 2011
Italy Palermo 12% 1% 9% 78% 2001
Netherlands Rotterdam 5% 14% 25% 56% 2004
Sweden Stockholm 15% 7% 43% 33% 2004
Netherlands The Hague 5% 22% 30% 43% 2004
Spain Seville 13% 6% 15% 64% 2012
Germany Stuttgart 13% 4% 32% 51% 2004
Estonia Tallinn 16% 0% 50% 34% 2004
Italy Turin 12% 3% 5% 79% 2004
Netherlands Utrecht 3% 21% 25% 51% 2004
Spain Valencia 16% 1% 21% 62% 2004
Spain Valladolid 22% 1% 20% 57% 2004
Spain Vigo 19% 0% 13% 68% 2004
Lithuania Vilnius 36% 0% 26% 38% 2011[16]
New Zealand Wellington 11% 3% 19% 65% 2009-2012[4]
Canada Winnipeg 5.5% 2.1% 14.6% 76.4% 2011[17]
Spain Zaragoza 17% 0% 29% 54% 2004
Switzerland Zürich 26% 4% 34% 36% 2005[18]

Notes: European data is based on the Urban Audit,[19] US data is based on the Census’ American Community Survey from 2009,[20] Australian data is based on main method of transport to work as recorded by the ABS Census.[21]

Modal share targets[edit]

The Charter of Brussels, signed by 36 cities including Brussels, Ghent, Milan, Munich, Seville, Edinburgh, Toulouse, Bordeaux, Gdansk, and Timisoara, commits the signatories to achieve at least 15% of bicycling modal share by 2020, and calls upon European institutions to do likewise.[22]

See also[edit]

External links[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Glossary (Engineering Services - Transportation, City of Vancouver website. Accessed 2009-06-04.)[dead link]
  2. ^ http://www.ramblers.org.uk/Walking/policy/transport/transportleisure
  3. ^ Singapore Land and Transport Authority: Journeys, issue 7, November 2011
  4. ^ a b c [1]
  5. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k Passenger Transport Mode Shares in World Cities
  6. ^ Camille Thiry (ed.). "Cahiers de l’Observatoire de la mobilité de la Région de Bruxelles-Capitale: Les pratiques de déplacement à Bruxelles" (in French). Bruxelles mobilité. p. 49. Retrieved 25 November 2013. 
  7. ^ [KOTI, "2013 National Transportation DB Report" 2013], retrieved 2013-12-31
  8. ^ Page 7 in Infas: Mobilität im Großraum Hamburg
  9. ^ Transport for London: "Travel in London" Report 5, 2012
  10. ^ Enquête Globale Transport 2010, retrieved 2012-09-19
  11. ^ The yearbook of transportation Prague 2009, page 5, retrieved 2011-03-23
  12. ^ City of Toronto, retrieved 29 April 2012
  13. ^ [2], (German) retrieved 2013-01-22
  14. ^ [3], (English) retrieved 2012-04-06
  15. ^ [4]
  16. ^ Naujų transporto rūšių diegimo Vilniaus mieste specialusis planas, retrieved 2013-07-03
  17. ^ http://www.winnipeg.ca/publicworks/MajorProjects/ActiveTransportation/WalkBikeWinnipeg/PDF/2014-04-14-WalkBikeWpg-OHBoards-Final.pdf
  18. ^ http://www.stadt-zuerich.ch/content/dam/stzh/ted/Deutsch/taz/Mobilitaet/Publikationen_und_Broschueren/Verkehrszahlen_und_Befragungen/Mobilitaet_in_Zahlen_2010.pdf
  19. ^ Urban Audit, retrieved 2009-10-03
  20. ^ The Transport Politic: "Transit Mode Share Trends Looking Steady; Rail Appears to Encourage Non-Automobile Commutes", October 13th, 2010
  21. ^ Mees, Paul et al. : Travel to work in Australian capital cities 1976-2006, 2007
  22. ^ Charter of Brussels, retrieved 2009-10-03