Paolo Zamboni

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Paolo Zamboni (born 25 March 1957, Ferrara, Italy) is an Italian doctor who claims to have found in an unblinded preliminary study that in over 90% of the participants with multiple sclerosis there were problems in veins draining their brain, like stenosis or defective valves.[1] He also noticed high level of accumulation of iron deposits in the brain, supposedly due to restricted outflow of blood.[2]

Paolo Zamboni

According to Zamboni some symptoms of multiple sclerosis in his own wife as well as 73% of his patients abated after an endovascular procedure to open these veins.[3][4][5]

Zamboni named this condition chronic cerebrospinal venous insufficiency (CCSVI).[6]

The theory is controversial. The National Multiple Sclerosis Society has said that, while "there is not yet enough evidence to conclude that obstruction of veins causes MS," that "[Zamboni's] hypothesis on CCSVI and its corrective treatment is a path that must be more fully explored and one that we are supporting with research funding."[7] Since 2010, there has been more research that disputes the Zamboni theory.[8][9]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Sclerosi multipla: la speranza viene da Ferrara? | NN - Notizie dall'Italia e dal Mondo dal 2009". Newnotizie.it. 2010-01-24. Retrieved 2013-09-07. 
  2. ^ Singh AV, Zamboni P (December 2009). "Anomalous venous blood flow and iron deposition in multiple sclerosis". J. Cereb. Blood Flow Metab. 29 (12): 1867–78. doi:10.1038/jcbfm.2009.180. PMID 19724286. 
  3. ^ Picard, André; Favaro, Avis (2009-11-20). "Researcher's labour of love leads to MS breakthrough". The Globe and Mail (Toronto). 
  4. ^ "W5: A whole new approach to MS | CTV News". Ctv.ca. Retrieved 2013-09-07. 
  5. ^ [1][dead link]
  6. ^ "The Liberation Treatment: A whole new approach to MS" (FLV, Web page). CTV Television Network, W5. 2009. Retrieved 2009-12-10. 
  7. ^ "CCSVI and MS FAQ". National Multiple Sclerosis Society. Retrieved 8 February 2014. 
  8. ^ "Massive study disputes Zamboni theory of multiple sclerosis". The Globe and Mail. 2011-08-10. 
  9. ^ Traboulsee, Anthony L., et al. (2013, October 9). Prevalence of extracranial venous narrowing on catheter venography in people with multiple sclerosis, their siblings, and unrelated healthy controls: a blinded, case-control study. The Lancet. Retrieved from http://press.thelancet.com/CCSVIcathetervenography.pdf

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