Peel Street, Montreal

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Peel Street
Rue Peel
Peel Street Golden Square Mile 1.jpg
Peel Street in the Golden Square Mile.
Former name(s) Windsor Street, Colborne Street, Rue Saint-François-de-Sales[1]
Length 2.4 km (1.5 mi)
Location Between Pine Avenue and Smith Street
Coordinates 45°30′01″N 73°34′25″W / 45.500414°N 73.57371°W / 45.500414; -73.57371
Construction
Inauguration August 23, 1854[1]

Peel Street is a major north-south street located in downtown Montreal, Quebec, Canada. The Street links Pine Avenue, near Mount Royal, in the north and Smith Street, in the Southwest borough, in the south. The street's southern end is at the Peel Basin of the Lachine Canal. The street runs through Montreal's shopping district. The Peel Metro station is named for the street.

History[edit]

Inaugurated on August 23, 1854, Peel Street was named after Sir Robert Peel (1788-1850), the former Prime Minister of the United Kingdom.[1] Peel Street was originally a quiet residential street in the Golden Square Mile.[2] Until 1959, Peel was known as Colborne Street south of Notre-Dame Street. Until 1968, the street was known as Windsor Street south of Dorchester Boulevard (today René Lévesque Boulevard).[3]

Route description[edit]

Peel Street during Montreal Grand Prix weekend.

Between Pine Avenue and Doctor Penfield Avenue in the Golden Square Mile, Peel Street is lined by former mansions converted into McGill University buildings. South of Doctor Penfield Avenue and north of Sherbrooke Street West, Peel is lined by residential towers on the western side of the street, including Le Cartier Apartments and Victorian row houses on the eastern side. The Consulate General of Pakistan is located in one of the row houses.

Between Sherbrooke Street West and De Maisonneuve Boulevard West, Peel is home to a few hotels and office buildings. The Montreal Amateur Athletic Association, Canada's oldest athletics association is located on this segment.

South of De Maisonneuve but north of Saint Catherine Street West, Peel is bordered by Les Cours Mont-Royal (formerly the Mount Royal Hotel) on the eastern side, and various small shops and restaurants on the western side. McGill University's Martlet House is located on this portion of the street, and was once home to the headquarters for Seagram.

Between Saint Catherine and René Lévesque Boulevard West, Peel is home to several pubs and restaurants on the western side. Also on the western side of this segment is the Windsor Hotel and the Tour CIBC. On the eastern side is the Dominion Square Building and Dorchester Square.

South of Réné Lévesque Blvd. and north of De la Gauchetière Street/Canadiens de Montréal Avenue, is the Édifice La Laurentienne and St. George's Anglican Church on the western side of the street, and Place du Canada on the eastern side.

Between De la Gauchètière and Saint Antoine Street West, Peel borders Windsor Station on the western side and the Chateau Champlain and the Place du Canada office building on the eastern side.

South of Saint Antoine and north of Saint Jacques Street, Peel is bordered by a former Canada Post building on the eastern side, and parking lots on the western side.

Between Saint Jacques and Notre Dame Street West, Peel is bordered by the former Dow Planetarium on the eastern side and École de technologie supérieure's Pavillon B on the western side.

South of Notre Dame to William Street, in the Griffintown neighbourhood, Peel is bordered by École de technologie supérieure's A Pavilion on the western side, and a few former brick industrial buildings on the eastern side.

Below William Street to the Lachine Canal, Peel is lined by a mix of condominium towers, as well as a few businesses.

Transport[edit]

The Peel station on the Montreal Metro's Green Line is located on the corner of Peel and De Maisonneuve Blvd. West, and opened on October 14, 1966.

Peel Street is served by the Societé de transport de Montréal's 107 Verdun bus rotue, which runs the entire length of the street from Pine Avenue to Wellington Street.

A proposed Montreal Tramway line would use Peel Street for a portion of its route.[4]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "Fiche descriptive: Rue Peel". Commission de toponymie du Québec. Retrieved 6 May 2013. 
  2. ^ "Peel Street". Pictures. IMTL.org. Retrieved 6 May 2013. 
  3. ^ "Station de métro Peel". Société de transport de Montréal. Retrieved 6 May 2013. 
  4. ^ "Tramway Le tramway de Montréal". Retrieved 13 May 2013. 

Coordinates: 45°30′01″N 73°34′25″W / 45.500414°N 73.57371°W / 45.500414; -73.57371