Pennsylvania Department of Conservation and Natural Resources

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Pennsylvania Department of Conservation and Natural Resources
Pennsylvania Department of Conservation and Natural Resources Logo.svg
Logo of the DCNR
Agency overview
Formed July 1, 1995
Jurisdiction Government of Pennsylvania
Headquarters Rachel Carson State Office Building
400 Market Street
Harrisburg, Pennsylvania
40°15′45″N 76°52′47″W / 40.26250°N 76.87972°W / 40.26250; -76.87972
Annual budget $310.5 million (FY 2010)[1]
Agency executive Richard J. Allan[2], Secretary of Conservation and Natural Resources
Child agency Bureau of State Parks
Website www.dcnr.state.pa.us

The Pennsylvania Department of Conservation and Natural Resources (DCNR), established on July 1, 1995, is the agency in the U.S. State of Pennsylvania responsible for maintaining and preserving the state's 117 state parks and 20 state forests; providing information on the state's natural resources; and working with communities to benefit local recreation and natural areas.[3] The agency has its headquarters in the Rachel Carson State Office Building in Harrisburg.[4]

The department was formed when then-governor Tom Ridge split the Department of Environmental Resources (DER) into the DCNR and Department of Environmental Protection (DEP).

History[edit]

Current Secretary of Conservation and Natural Resources[edit]

  • Ellen Ferretti

Past Secretaries of Conservation and Natural Resources[edit]

  • John Quigley (Appointed April 2009)
  • Michael D. DiBerardinis (Appointed January 2003)
  • John C. Oliver (Appointed November 1995)

Education[edit]

The DCNR is host to many different Environmental Education programs throughout the summer months. These range from topics such as "Leave No Trace" hiking/camping policy to the different wildlife and plant species of many of the state parks.

Law enforcement[edit]

DCNR Rangers act much like a National Park Ranger does. They routinely check on cabins and campsites, offer insightful answers to visitors questions, and help to maintain calmness throughout the parks. They have full arrest powers while in park lands and do carry sidearms. However, they do not have jurisdiction over Pennsylvania State Game Lands, which are patrolled by Wildlife Conservation Officers employed by the Pennsylvania Game Commission. DCNR rangers do enforce game laws as well as fishing and boating laws in state parks, however, although the Pennsylvania Fish and Boat Commission is completely independent of the Pennsylvania Game Commission. Both agencies are independent of DCNR, but do work in cooperation with each other.

Organizational structure[edit]

The DCNR comprises the following subunits:[5][6][7]

  • Deputy Secretary for Parks and Forestry
  • Deputy Secretary for Conservation and Technical Services
  • Deputy Secretary for Administration
    • Bureau of Human Resources
    • Bureau of Administrative Services
    • Bureau of Information Technology
  • Office of Policy and Planning
  • Office of Education, Communications and Partnerships
  • Office of Conservation Science
  • Chief Counsel

See also[edit]


References[edit]

  1. ^ "2010–11 Governor's Executive Budget" (PDF). Harrisburg: Pennsylvania Office of the Budget. February 2, 2010. p. E12.6. Retrieved July 14, 2010. 
  2. ^ Trostle, Sharon, ed. (2009). The Pennsylvania Manual 119. Harrisburg: Pennsylvania Department of General Services. pp. 4–43. ISBN 0-8182-0334-X. 
  3. ^ Pa. Dept. of Conservation and Natural Resources
  4. ^ "Contact DCNR." Pennsylvania Department of Conservation and Natural Resources. Retrieved on October 18, 2010. "Department of Conservation and Natural Resources Rachel Carson State Office Building PO Box 8767 400 Market Street Harrisburg, PA 17105-8767."
  5. ^ DCNR Bureaus. Pennsylvania Department of Conservation and Recreation. Retrieved on 2009-05-31.
  6. ^ DCNR Organization Chart. Pennsylvania Department of Conservation and Recreation. Retrieved on 2009-05-31.
  7. ^ DCNR Executive Staff. Pennsylvania Department of Conservation and Recreation. Retrieved on 2009-05-31.

External links[edit]