Phillip Street, Sydney

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Sydney Law School
The Supreme Court Building
Ben Chifley statue in Chifley Place

Phillip Street is a street in the central business district of Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. While the street runs from King Street in the south to Circular Quay in the north, the present street is effectively in two sections, separated by Chifley Square. Other cross streets include Martin Place, Bridge Street, and Bent Street.

History[edit]

Phillip Street was the residence of Henry Lawson when he first moved to Sydney in 1883. He joined his mother and sister at number 138, and was still living here when his first poem, A Song of the Republic, was published by The Bulletin on 1 October 1887.

Location[edit]

The southern section of Phillip Street runs from Queens Square, at the end of King Street, to Chifley Square, at the confluence of Hunter, Phillip, and Elizabeth Streets. At Chifley Square, Elizabeth Street takes a turn to the right and becomes the northern section of Phillip Street, which is aligned in a north-south direction with the southern section. The street is two-ways in both sections.

Located along Phillip Street are a number of office buildings, including the premises of a large portion of Sydney's legal profession, as well as the Supreme Court of New South Wales and St. James campus of the Sydney Law School. Other prominent buildings along the street include Aurora Place, Chifley Tower, and Deutsche Bank Place, Commonwealth Parliament Offices, Sydney and the headquarters of the Reserve Bank of Australia, as well as St James' Church. The headquarters of the Australian Rugby League and New South Wales Rugby League organisations are also located here, with Australia's traditional rugby league administration sometimes referred to as "Phillip Street".[1]

A variety of cafés and restaurants located along the street service these institutions. Railway stations located on or near Phillip Street include St James, Martin Place, and Circular Quay.

See also[edit]

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References[edit]

  1. ^ Curran, Brian (3 June 1981). "The bumbling white elephant at Phillip Street". The Sydney Morning Herald. Retrieved 18 April 2012.