Quiévrain

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Quiévrain
Municipality of Belgium
Quiévrain: St Martin's church (16th century)
Quiévrain: St Martin's church (16th century)
Flag of Quiévrain
Flag
Coat of arms of Quiévrain
Coat of arms
Quiévrain is located in Belgium
Quiévrain
Quiévrain
Location in Belgium
Coordinates: 50°24′N 03°41′E / 50.400°N 3.683°E / 50.400; 3.683Coordinates: 50°24′N 03°41′E / 50.400°N 3.683°E / 50.400; 3.683
Country Belgium
Community French Community
Region Wallonia
Province Hainaut
Arrondissement Mons
Government
 • Mayor Daniel Dorsimont (PS)
 • Governing party/ies PS, AC
Area
 • Total 21.22 km2 (8.19 sq mi)
Population (1 January 2012)[1]
 • Total 6,716
 • Density 320/km2 (820/sq mi)
Postal codes 7380, 7382
Area codes 065
Website www.quievrain.be

Quiévrain is a Walloon municipality located in the Belgian province of Hainaut. On 1 January 2006, the municipality had 6,559 inhabitants. The total area is 21.22 km², giving a population density of 309 inhabitants per km².

Revolutions of 1848[edit]

Shortly after the French Revolution of 1848, Belgian migrant workers living in Paris were encouraged to return to Belgium to overthrow the monarchy and establish a republic.[2] Around 6,000 émigrés, coming from Paris, formed the "Belgian Legion". The legion was armed by some of the administrative authorities of Lille, and intended to penetrate into Belgium to "raise the people" and overthrow the Belgian monarchy. It is likely that the revolutionaries had the support of the Minister of Foreign Affairs of the French Second Republic, which had only recently been installed and was still very militant. The first group, travelling by train, was stopped and quickly disarmed at Quiévrain on 26 March 1848.[3] The second group crossed into Belgium and was defeated in the Risquons-Tout incident.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Population per municipality on 1 January 2012 (XLS; 214 KB)
  2. ^ Chastain, James. "Belgium in 1848". Encyclopedia of 1848 Revolutions. Ohio University. Retrieved 16 December 2013. 
  3. ^ Ascherson, Neal (1999). The King Incorporated: Leopold the Second and the Congo (New ed.). London: Granta. pp. 20–1. ISBN 1862072906.