Ralph Baines

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Ralph Baines or "Bayne"[1] (Knowsthorpe, Yorkshire, ca. 1504 – Islington, 18 November 1559) was the last Roman Catholic bishop of Lichfield and Coventry, in England.

Early life[edit]

Educated at St. John's College, Cambridge, Baines was ordained priest at Ely in 1519.[2] He came out against Hugh Latimer, and opposed Henry VIII's divorce from Catherine of Aragon, being incited to the latter by John Fisher.[3]

He was rector of Hardwick, Cambridgeshire, until 1544;[4] but he had left the country by 1538.[5]

Hebraist[edit]

Baines was a Hebraist, being a college lecturer in Hebrew at St John's. He went to Paris and became professor of Hebrew at the Collège de France, (professor of the Hebrew language, 1549 to 1554).[6]

He was the author of the work "Compendium Michlol" (also with the Hebrew title, "Ḳiẓẓur ha-Ḥeleḳ Rishon ha-Miklol"), containing a Latin abstract of the first part of David Ḳimḥi's Hebrew grammar, and dealing methodically with the letters, reading, nouns, regular and irregular verbs, prefixes and suffixes (Paris, 1554).

Bishop[edit]

In 1554, Baines returned to England and was consecrated bishop of Lichfield and Coventry, on 18 November 1554.

He vigorously opposed the Protestant Reformers, and features largely in Foxe's Book of Martyrs,[7] conducting many examinations with his Chancellor, Anthony Draycot.[8] His chancellor was involved, for instance, in the burning of a young blind woman, Joan Waste for heresy in Derby.[9] He was one of the eight defenders of Catholic doctrine at the Westminster Conference of 1558/9.

On the accession of Elizabeth I of England, he was deprived of his bishopric (21 June 1559)[10] and committed to the care of Edmund Grindal, the Protestant Bishop of London, becoming one of eleven imprisoned bishops (researches of G. Philips support a theory that, though nominally a guest, Baines was in fact a strict prisoner). His captivity lasted until 18 November 1559, when, in the words of fellow Roman Catholic John Pitts, Baines "died an illustrious Confessor of the Lord".

Works[edit]

  • Prima Rudimenta in linguam Hebraicam (Paris, 1550)
  • Compendium Michol, hoc est absolutissimæ grammatices Davidis Chimhi (Paris, 1554)
  • In Proverbia Salomonis (Paris, 1555).

References[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Bayne, Baynes, Banes; Rudolphus, Rudolph, Rodolph, Rodolphus Baynus.
  2. ^ "Baynes, Ralph (BNS517R)". A Cambridge Alumni Database. University of Cambridge. 
  3. ^ Richard Rex, The Theology of John Fisher (1991), p. 176.
  4. ^ History – Hardwick village
  5. ^ Peter Marshall, Religious Identities in Henry VIII's England (2006), p. 232.
  6. ^ The Circulation of Knowledge in Humanist Europe – CNRS Web site – CNRS
  7. ^ http://www.hrionline.ac.uk/johnfoxe/apparatus/person_glossaryB.html, under Ralph Bayne.
  8. ^ John Foxe's Book of Martyrs
  9. ^ Blind Joan (22) Is Executed, HeadlineHistory.co.uk, accessed February 2009
  10. ^ Bishops | British History Online

External links[edit]

Catholic Church titles
Preceded by
Richard Sampson
Bishop of Lichfield
1554–1559
Succeeded by
Thomas Bentham

 This article incorporates text from a publication now in the public domainJewish Encyclopedia. 1901–1906.  This article incorporates text from a publication now in the public domainHerbermann, Charles, ed. (1913). Catholic Encyclopedia. Robert Appleton Company.