Religion in Antigua and Barbuda

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St. John's Cathedral, St. John's, Antigua and Barbuda

According to the 2001 census, which has the most reliable figures available, 74 percent of the population of Antigua and Barbuda is Christian.[1] The Anglican Church is the largest religious denomination, accounting for an estimated 26 percent of the population.[1] The Methodist, Moravian, and Roman Catholic churches account for less than 10 percent each.[1] The United Evangelical Association, an organization that includes most independent evangelical churches, claims an estimated 25 percent of the population, and Jehovah's Witnesses number more than 1,000 members.[1] The total number of non-Christians is small; they include an estimated 1,000 to 1,500 Rastafarians, more than 200 Muslims, nearly 200 Hindus, about 30 Jews, and approximately 50 members of the Baha'i Faith.[1] There are more than 4,000 atheists or persons who do not follow a particular religion.[1] The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints claims 161 members as of year-end 2007.[2]

The Constitution provides for freedom of religion, and the Government generally respects this right in practice.[1] The US government documented no reports of societal abuses or discrimination based on religious belief or practice in their 2007 religious freedom report, and prominent societal leaders took positive steps to promote religious freedom.[1]

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References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h International Religious Freedom Report 2007: Antigua and Barbuda. United States Bureau of Democracy, Human Rights and Labor (September 14, 2007). This article incorporates text from this source, which is in the public domain.
  2. ^ Antigua and Barbuda. LDS Newsroom. Retrieved 2008-12-13.