Richard X. Slattery

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Richard X. Slattery
Born Richard Xavier Slattery
(1925-06-26)June 26, 1925
The Bronx, New York, U.S.
Died January 27, 1997(1997-01-27) (aged 71)
Los Angeles, California, U.S.
Occupation Actor
Years active 1960–1990

Richard X. Slattery (June 26, 1925 – January 27, 1997) was a character actor in film, theater and television.[1] Slattery starred in such films as Walking Tall, The No Mercy Man and Herbie Rides Again.

Richard Xavier Slattery was distinguished by a square-jawed look and a rough, gravelly voice that made him ideal as a "tough guy" character, usually as a cowboy or a cop or a drill sergeant type. He had been an NYPD police officer for twelve years (1948–1960) and started his acting career in police academy training films, and in community theater in the Bronx.

Slattery appeared in the first season of The Odd Couple, episode #2 "The Fight of the Felix". After Oscar gets into a fight with a hockey player played by Slattery, Felix tries to stand up for his roommate, but ends up in the boxing ring instead (original air date: October 8, 1970).

Slattery starred in a revival of the play The Time of Your Life, starting March 17, 1972, at the Huntington Hartford Theater in Los Angeles.[2][3]

During the 1970s he was featured in many TV commercials for Union 76 gasoline, playing a grandfatherly service station owner named Murph (filmed at the 76 station adjacent to Dodger Stadium). He had featured roles in three series: The Gallant Men (as 1st Sgt. John McKenna), Mister Roberts (as Captain John Morton), and C.P.O. Sharkey (as Captain "Buck" Buckner). He appeared on the Cannon episode, "The Cure That Kills," as a carnival owner, an episode which aired as a rerun on MeTV on February 2, 2014.

His son, Kevin, is a television producer (Just Shoot Me).[4]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "The New York Times". The New York Times. Retrieved 2012-01-15. 
  2. ^ "WorldCat". Worldcat.org. Retrieved 2012-01-22. 
  3. ^ "Hollywood Beat". The Afro American. 1972-04-08. Retrieved 2012-01-22. 
  4. ^ "The New York Times". The New York Times. Retrieved 2012-01-15. 

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