Saulo Ribeiro

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Saulo Ribeiro
Born Manaus, Brazil[1]
Residence San Diego, California
Nationality United States Brazil American Brazilian
Height 5 ft 9 in (1.75 m)
Weight 180 lb (82 kg; 12 st 12 lb)
Style Submission Wrestling, Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu and Judo
Team Gracie Humaita/ Ribeiro Jiu Jitsu
Rank

     4th degree black belt in Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu

     Black belt in Judo
Mixed martial arts record from Sherdog
Saulo Ribeiro
Medal record
Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu/Grappling
World Jiu-Jitsu Championship
Silver 2007 Light-Heavyweight (black)[2]
Bronze 2005 Absolute (black)[3]
Gold 2002 Light-Heavyweight (black)[4]
Silver 2002 Absolute (black)[4]
Silver 2001 Light-Heavyweight (black)[5]
Silver 2001 Absolute (black)[5]
Gold 2000 Super-Heavyweight (black)[6]
Gold 1999 Light-Heavyweight (black)[7]
Gold 1998 Heavyweight (black)[8]
Gold 1997 Middleweight (black)[9]
ADCC Submission Wrestling World Championship
Bronze 2005 -88kg
Gold 2003 -88kg
Silver 2001 -88kg
Gold 2000 -88kg
Silver 1999 -99kg
Pan American Championships
Gold 1998 Heavyweight (black)
Gold 1998 Absolute (black)
World No-Gi Championship
Gold 2008 Medium-Heavyweight (black)
International Masters and Seniors Championship
Gold 2010 Heavyweight (black)[10]
Silver 2010 Absolute (black)[10]
World Masters and Seniors Championship
Gold 2012 Super-Heavy (black)[11]
Gold 2012 Absolute (black)[11]
Gold 2013 Super-Heavy (black)[12]
Gold 2013 Absolute (black)[12]
Brazilian National Jiu-Jitsu Championship
Gold 1998 Medium-Heavy (black)[13]
Gold 1998 Absolute (black)[14]
Gold 1996 Super-Heavy (black)[15]

Saulo Ribeiro, brother of the equally famed Xande Ribeiro, is a 4th degree black belt in Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu. After earning a black belt in Judo, he began his training of Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu in Rio De Janeiro under Royler Gracie, the son of Hélio Gracie, at the famous Gracie Humaitá.[1]

Saulo received his black belt in BJJ on November 27, 1995. Less than 2 years later, he won his first MMA fight. He also won the World Jiu-Jitsu Championship five times, in an equal amount of varying weight classes.[1]

Biography[edit]

Saulo Ribeiro was born in Manaus, Brazil in July 1974.[16] At the age of 15 and already a Judo practitioner, Saulo started training Jiu Jitsu as a way to improve his Judo game by learning submissions.[16] He moved away from home in December 1991 and headed to school in Rio de Janeiro.[16] Rio de Janeiro is where Saulo began his training under Royler Gracie, at the legendary Gracie Humaitá.[16] Shortly after receiving his black belt from Royler Gracie on November 27, 1995, Saulo won the Brazilian Nationals Lightweight Title.[16]

Jiu Jitsu University[edit]

Alongside brother Xande, Saulo runs the University of Jiu Jitsu in San Diego, California, a school that focuses as much on the traditional and character aspects of students as technical and practical ability.[17]

Saulo is also the author of the book Jiu Jitsu University, a detailed training manual that presents techniques for each belt level from white to black belt.[18] In addition, he teaches in various instructional DVD releases, like the "Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu Revolution" series which was first released in 2004.

Instructorship[edit]

Saulo, through the Ribeiro Jiu-Jitsu Association, is said to have over 2000 students,[citation needed] and has graduated over 30 black belts.[citation needed] Saulo has also been coach to many high-level grappling competitors such as World Jiu-Jitsu Champion Rafael Lavato Jr., and MMA Fighter Diego Sanchez, who trained out of The Arena (MMA) gym in San Diego until Sanchez returned to his home state of New Mexico.[1][19]

Retirement and return[edit]

The 2009 ADCC in Barcelona would be Saulo's last, and saw him, to the surprise of many, competing in the +99 kg weight category. He defeated Kouji Kanechika and World Jiu-Jitsu Champion Romulo Barral before losing to the much larger Fabricio Werdum in the semifinal on judges' decision. After losing on another judges' decision in the third-place dispute to Jeff Monson, Saulo announced his retirement from professional jiu-jitsu and grappling competition.[20]

Less than a year later, Ribeiro announced he would be competing for the first time in the International Masters and Seniors tournament. He succeeded in winning his weight division, along with the team trophy for Gracie Humaita, who had lost it to Gracie Barra the previous year.[21]

Mixed martial arts record[edit]

Res. Record Opponent Method Event Date Round Time Location Notes
Win 2–1 Jason Ireland Submission (Rear Naked Choke) TFC 5 - Fightzone 5 September 21, 2002 - -

Toledo, Ohio

[22]
Loss 1–1 Yuki Kondo TKO (Punches) C2K - Colosseum 2000 May 26, 2000 1 0:22 Japan [22]
Win 1–0 Carlos Lopes Submission (Rear Naked Choke) CDL - Carioca de Freestyle February 10, 1996 - -

Brazil

[22]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d "Saulo Ribeiro (Gracie Humaita)". BJJ Heroes. May 26, 2010. Retrieved September 14, 2011. 
  2. ^ "Mundial 2007". Official IFBJJ results. Retrieved February 29, 2012. 
  3. ^ "Mundial 2005". Official IFBJJ results. Retrieved March 1, 2012. 
  4. ^ a b "Mundial 2002". Official IFBJJ results. Retrieved September 13, 2011. 
  5. ^ a b "VI CAMPEONATO MUNDIAL 2001". Official IFBJJ results. Retrieved September 13, 2011. 
  6. ^ "Mundial 2000". Official IFBJJ results. Retrieved September 13, 2011. 
  7. ^ "CAMPEONATO MUNDIAL 1999". Official IFBJJ results. Retrieved September 13, 2011. 
  8. ^ "CAMPEONATO MUNDIAL 1998". Official IFBJJ results. Retrieved September 13, 2011. 
  9. ^ "CAMPEONATO MUNDIAL 1997". Official IFBJJ results. Retrieved September 13, 2011. 
  10. ^ a b "Resultados". Official IFBJJ results. Retrieved September 13, 2011. 
  11. ^ a b "Resultados". Official IFBJJ results. Retrieved December 18, 2013. 
  12. ^ a b "Results". Official IFBJJ results. Retrieved December 18, 2013. 
  13. ^ "Brazilian Nationals Jiu-Jitsu Championship 1998 – Results". Official IFBJJ results. Retrieved March 20, 2014. 
  14. ^ "Brazilian Nationals Jiu-Jitsu Championship 1998 – Results". Official IFBJJ results. Retrieved March 20, 2014. 
  15. ^ "Brazilian Nationals Jiu-Jitsu Championship 1996 – Results". Official IFBJJ results. Retrieved March 20, 2014. 
  16. ^ a b c d e "About The University of Jiu Jitsu". UNIJJ. Retrieved February 12, 2012. 
  17. ^ "The "World Famous" University of Jiu Jitsu". UNIJJ. Retrieved September 14, 2011. 
  18. ^ "Jiu-Jitsu University [Paperback]". Amazon. Retrieved September 14, 2011. 
  19. ^ "I AM RAFAEL LOVATO JR.". Retrieved September 14, 2011. 
  20. ^ "Saulo Ribeiro says goodbye to ADCC". Tatame. Oct 3, 2009. Retrieved September 13, 2011. 
  21. ^ "Saulo announces he’s coming out of retirement… Again!". Grappling Weekly. July 8, 2010. Retrieved September 13, 2011. 
  22. ^ a b c "Fight Finder - Saulo Ribeiro Mixed Martial Arts Statistics". Sherdog.com. Retrieved September 13, 2011. 
  1. International Federation of Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu. World Championship, Results. ibjjf.com.

External links[edit]